FIDE Grand Prix 2019

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The FIDE Grand Prix 2019 is a series of four chess tournaments that forms part of the qualification cycle for the World Chess Championship 2020. The top two finishers will qualify to the 2020 Candidates Tournament.

Format[edit]

There are four tournaments in the cycle; each consisting of 16 players. There are 21 contestants, who each play in 3 of the 4 tournaments.

The tournaments are knock-out tournaments, in the same style as the Chess World Cup. At each round of the tournament, players play a best-of-2 game knock-out match. The regular games are:

  • best-of-2 games at a time limit of 90 minutes, + 30 minutes added after move 40, + 30 second per move increment from move 1.

If the match is tied 1-1, up to four tie breaks are played, at progressively faster time limits, with the match ending when a player wins any tie break. The tie breaks are, in order:[1]

  • best-of-2 games at a time limit of 25 minutes, + 10 second per move increment from move 1.
  • best-of-2 games at a time limit of 10 minutes, + 10 second per move increment from move 1.
  • best-of-2 games at a time limit of 5 minutes, + 3 second per move increment from move 1.
  • a single armageddon chess game: white receives 5 minutes + 2 second per move increment from move 61; black receives 4 minutes + 2 second per move increment from move 61; black wins the match in the case of a draw.

Players receive Grand Prix points as follows:

Round Grand Prix points
Winner 8
Runner-Up 5
Semi-final loser 3
Round 2 loser 1
Round 1 loser 0
Each match won without a tie-break +1

The two players with most Grand Prix points qualify for the 2020 Candidates tournament. In the event of a tie on Grand Prix points, the following tie breaks are applied, in order:[1]

  • most tournament wins;
  • most tournament second places;
  • most points won in standard time control games;
  • head-to-head score, in terms of matches, between players tied;
  • drawing of lots.

The tournament dates and locations are as follows:[2]

Prize money[edit]

The prize money is €130,000 per single Grand Prix with an additional €280,000 for the overall Grand Prix standings for a total prize fund of €800,000.

For each individual tournament, the prize money is: €24,000 for the winner, €14,000 for the runner-up, €10,000 for the semi-final losers, €8,000 for the Round 2 losers, and €5,000 for the Round 1 losers.

For the final standings, the prize money is €50,000 for 1st, €45,000 for 2nd, and so on down in steps of €5,000 to €10,000 for 9th, and also €10,000 for 10th. Prize money for players on equal Grand Prix points is shared.

Players[edit]

The Grand Prix consists of 21 players. 20 qualify by rating, and 1 player was nominated by World Chess. The rating used was the average of the 12 monthly lists from February 2018 to January 2019.[1]

Since that leaves one place in the final tournament, one player is nominated by Tel Aviv organizer to play in the Tel Aviv tournament only, and their result will be not counted to the Grand Prix.

The list of rating qualifiers was released on 25 January 2019.[3] Five players qualified but declined their invitations: Magnus Carlsen, Fabiano Caruana, Ding Liren, Vladimir Kramnik and Viswanathan Anand. Carlsen and Caruana had no need to play in the tournament (Carlsen as World Champion, and Caruana had already qualified for the Candidates Tournament); while Kramnik had recently announced his retirement. This resulted in the first five reserves being invited.

The final list of Grand Prix players, including Daniil Dubov as the organizer's nominee, and their schedule, was released on 19 February.[4]

Invitee Country Qualifying method Plays in tournaments
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov  Azerbaijan rating (3) 1,2,4
Maxime Vachier-Lagrave  France rating (6) 2,3,4
Anish Giri  Netherlands rating (7) 1,2,4
Wesley So  United States rating (8) 1,2,4
Levon Aronian  Armenia rating (9) 1,2,4
Alexander Grischuk  Russia rating (11) 1,2,3
Hikaru Nakamura  United States rating (12) 1,2,3
Sergey Karjakin  Russia rating (13) 1,2,4
Yu Yangyi  China rating (14) 2,3,4
Ian Nepomniachtchi  Russia rating (15) 1,3,4
Peter Svidler  Russia rating (16) 1,2,3
Teimour Radjabov  Azerbaijan rating (17) 1,3,4
Veselin Topalov  Bulgaria rating (18) 2,3,4
Dmitry Jakovenko  Russia rating (19) 1,3,4
David Navara  Czech Republic rating (20) 2,3,4
Radoslaw Wojtaszek  Poland rating (1st reserve) 1,3,4
Wei Yi  China rating (2nd reserve) 1,3,4
Jan-Krzysztof Duda  Poland rating (3rd reserve) 1,2,3
Pentala Harikrishna  India rating (4th reserve) 2,3,4
Nikita Vitiugov  Russia rating (5th reserve) 1,2,3
Daniil Dubov  Russia Organizer nominee 1,2,3

Events Results[edit]

Moscow 2019[edit]

The first tournament is being held in, Moscow, Russia.

Round 1 is on May 17-19, Round 2 on May 20-22, Semi-finals on May 23-25, and the Final on May 27-29. Each round has a day each for the two regular games, and a third day for tie-breaks. Games begin at 3.00pm Moscow time (12.00pm UTC).[5]

Players are seeded according to their rating at the start of the tournament, the May 2019 ratings list.[6] The top 4 seeds (Giri, Mamedyarov, Nepomniachtchi, Grischuk) were placed into different quarters of the draw, and the remaining starting positions were decided by the drawing of lots at the opening ceremony on May 16.[1] [7]

First round Quarter-finals Semi-final Final
            
1  Anish Giri (NED) ½
16  Daniil Dubov (RUS)
16  Daniil Dubov (RUS)
6  Hikaru Nakamura (USA)
7  Teimour Radjabov (AZE)
6  Hikaru Nakamura (USA)
6  Hikaru Nakamura (USA) ½
4  Alexander Grischuk (RUS) ½
13  Jan-Krzysztof Duda (POL)
8  Wesley So (USA)
8  Wesley So (USA)
4  Alexander Grischuk (RUS)
9  Sergey Karjakin (RUS) ½
4  Alexander Grischuk (RUS)
   
 
3  Ian Nepomniachtchi (RUS)
5  Levon Aronian (ARM) ½
3  Ian Nepomniachtchi (RUS)
11  Wei Yi (CHN)
11  Wei Yi (CHN)
15  Dmitry Jakovenko (RUS) ½
3  Ian Nepomniachtchi (RUS) ½
14  Radoslaw Wojtaszek (POL) ½
12  Nikita Vitiugov (RUS) ½
10  Peter Svidler (RUS)
10  Peter Svidler (RUS) ½
14  Radoslaw Wojtaszek (POL)
14  Radoslaw Wojtaszek (POL)
2  Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (AZE) ½

Riga 2019[edit]

2nd stage, Riga, Latvia 11–25 July 2019

First round Second round Third round Fourth round
            
1  
16  
 
 
8  
9  
 
 
4  
13  
 
 
5  
12  
 
 
2  
15  
 
 
7  
10  
 
 
3  
14  
 
 
6  
11  

Hamburg 2019[edit]

3rd stage, Hamburg, Germany 4–18 November 2019

First round Second round Third round Fourth round
            
1  
16  
 
 
8  
9  
 
 
4  
13  
 
 
5  
12  
 
 
2  
15  
 
 
7  
10  
 
 
3  
14  
 
 
6  
11  

Tel Aviv 2019[edit]

4th stage, Tel Aviv, Israel 10–24 December 2019

First round Second round Third round Fourth round
            
1  
16  
 
 
8  
9  
 
 
4  
13  
 
 
5  
12  
 
 
2  
15  
 
 
7  
10  
 
 
3  
14  
 
 
6  
11  


Grand Prix standings[edit]

Grand Prix points in bold indicate a tournament win. Green indicates qualifiers for the 2020 Candidates Tournament.

Player FIDE rating
May 2019
Moscow Riga Hamburg Tel Aviv Total
1  Radoslaw Wojtaszek (POL) 2724 5 5
2  Ian Nepomniachtchi (RUS) 2773 4 4
3  Alexander Grischuk (RUS) 2772 4 4
4  Hikaru Nakamura (USA) 2761 3 3
5  Peter Svidler (RUS) 2739 2 2
6  Wei Yi (CHN) 2736 2 2
7  Daniil Dubov (RUS) 2690 2 2
8  Wesley So (USA) 2754 1 1
9  Anish Giri (NED) 2787 0 0
10  Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (AZE) 2781 0 0
11  Levon Aronian (ARM) 2762 0 0
12  Teimour Radjabov (AZE) 2759 0 0
13  Sergey Karjakin (RUS) 2752 0 0
14  Nikita Vitiugov (RUS) 2752 0 0
15  Jan-Krzysztof Duda (POL) 2728 0 0
16  Dmitry Jakovenko (RUS) 2708 0 0
17  Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (FRA) 2780
18  Veselin Topalov (BUL) 2740
19  Yu Yangyi (CHN) 2739
20  Pentala Harikrishna (IND) 2730
21  David Navara (CZE) 2728

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Regulations for the FIDE Grand Prix Series 2019" (PDF). FIDE. 7 February 2019. Retrieved 8 February 2019.
  2. ^ "2019 Grand Prix: Where Chess Meets Start-up Nations". FIDE. 7 February 2019. Retrieved 8 February 2019.
  3. ^ 2019 Grand Prix Series: Dates and Qualifiers, FIDE, 25 January 2019
  4. ^ FIDE announces the line-up for the FIDE World Chess Grand Prix Series 2019, FIDE, 19 February 2019
  5. ^ 2019 FIDE Grand Prix Series starts in Moscow on May 17, FIDE, 13 May 2019
  6. ^ Top 100 Players May 2019, FIDE
  7. ^ FIDE Grand Prix to kick off in Moscow, Chess24, 16 May 2019

External links[edit]