List of FIFA World Cup records

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This is a list of records of the FIFA World Cup and its qualification matches.

General statistics by tournament[edit]

Year Host Champion Winning coach Top scorer(s) Best player award[1][2]
1930  Uruguay  Uruguay Uruguay Alberto Suppici Argentina Guillermo Stábile (8) N/A
1934  Italy  Italy Italy Vittorio Pozzo Czechoslovakia Oldřich Nejedlý (5)
1938  France  Italy Italy Vittorio Pozzo Brazil Leônidas (7)
1950  Brazil  Uruguay Uruguay Juan López Brazil Ademir (8)
1954   Switzerland  West Germany West Germany Sepp Herberger Hungary Sándor Kocsis (11)
1958  Sweden  Brazil Brazil Vicente Feola France Just Fontaine (13)
1962  Chile  Brazil Brazil Aymoré Moreira Brazil Garrincha (4)
Brazil Vavá (4)
Chile Leonel Sánchez (4)
Hungary Flórián Albert (4)
Soviet Union Valentin Ivanov (4)
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Dražan Jerković (4)
1966  England  England England Alf Ramsey Portugal Eusébio (9)
1970  Mexico  Brazil Brazil Mário Zagallo West Germany Gerd Müller (10)
1974  West Germany  West Germany West Germany Helmut Schön Poland Grzegorz Lato (7)
1978  Argentina  Argentina Argentina César Luis Menotti Argentina Mario Kempes (6)
1982  Spain  Italy Italy Enzo Bearzot Italy Paolo Rossi (6) Italy Paolo Rossi
1986  Mexico  Argentina Argentina Carlos Bilardo England Gary Lineker (6) Argentina Diego Maradona
1990  Italy  West Germany West Germany Franz Beckenbauer Italy Salvatore Schillaci (6) Italy Salvatore Schillaci
1994  United States  Brazil Brazil Carlos Alberto Parreira Bulgaria Hristo Stoichkov (6)
Russia Oleg Salenko (6)
Brazil Romário
1998  France  France France Aimé Jacquet Croatia Davor Šuker (6) Brazil Ronaldo
2002  South Korea
 Japan
 Brazil Brazil Luiz Felipe Scolari Brazil Ronaldo (8) Germany Oliver Kahn
2006  Germany  Italy Italy Marcello Lippi Germany Miroslav Klose (5) France Zinedine Zidane
2010  South Africa  Spain Spain Vicente del Bosque Germany Thomas Müller (5)
Netherlands Wesley Sneijder (5)
Spain David Villa (5)
Uruguay Diego Forlán (5)
Uruguay Diego Forlán
2014  Brazil  Germany Germany Joachim Löw Colombia James Rodríguez (6) Argentina Lionel Messi

Teams: tournament position[edit]

All-time table[edit]

Players[edit]

Most championships
3, Pelé ( Brazil, 1958, 1962 (only played in first two matches; medal awarded retroactively by FIFA in 2007[3]) and 1970).
See here for a list of players who have won multiple FIFA World Cups.
Most medals
4, Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014).
Most appearances in All-Star Team
3, Djalma Santos ( Brazil, 1954–1962), Franz Beckenbauer ( West Germany, 1966–1974), Philipp Lahm ( Germany, 2006–2014).
Most matches played, finals
25, Lothar Matthäus ( Germany, 1982–1998).
Most knockout games played, finals
14, Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014).
Most minutes played, finals
2,217 minutes, Paolo Maldini ( Italy, 1990–2002).
Most matches played, qualifying
68, Iván Hurtado ( Ecuador, 1994–2010).
Most matches won
17, Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014).
Most appearances in a World Cup final
3, Cafu ( Brazil, 1994, 1998, 2002).[4]
Most finals played with different teams
2, Luis Monti ( Argentina, 1930 and  Italy, 1934).
Most appearances as captain
16, Diego Maradona ( Argentina, 1986–1994).
Most tournaments as captain
4, Rafael Márquez ( Mexico, 2002–2014).[5]
Most appearances as substitute
11, Denílson ( Brazil, 1998–2002).
Youngest player
17 years, 41 days, Norman Whiteside ( Northern Ireland), vs Yugoslavia, 17 June 1982.
Youngest player, final
17 years, 249 days, Pelé ( Brazil), vs Sweden, 29 June 1958.
Youngest player, qualifying match
13 years, 310 days, Souleymane Mamam ( Togo), vs Zambia, 6 May 2001, 2002 CAF Group 1.[6]
Youngest captain
21 years, 109 days, Tony Meola ( United States), vs Czechoslovakia, 10 June 1990.[7]
Oldest player
43 years, 3 days, Faryd Mondragón ( Colombia), vs Japan, 24 June 2014.
Oldest player, final
40 years, 133 days, Dino Zoff ( Italy), vs West Germany, 11 July 1982.
Oldest player, qualifying match
46 years, 175 days, MacDonald Taylor, Sr. ( U.S. Virgin Islands), vs Saint Kitts and Nevis, 18 February 2004, 2006 CONCACAF First Round.[8]
Oldest captain
40 years, 292 days, Peter Shilton ( England), vs Italy, 7 July 1990.
Oldest player to debut in a World Cup finals tournament
39 years, 321 days, David James ( England), vs Algeria, 18 June 2010.

Goalscoring[edit]

Individual[edit]

Most goals scored, overall finals
16, Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014).
Most goals scored, overall qualifying
39, Carlos Ruiz ( Guatemala, 2002–2018).[9]
Most goals scored in a tournament
13, Just Fontaine ( France, 1958).
For a detailed list of top goalscorers in each tournament (Golden Boot winner), see Golden Boot.
Most goals scored in a match
5, Oleg Salenko ( Russia), vs Cameroon, 1994.
Most goals scored in a lost match
4, Ernest Wilimowski ( Poland), vs Brazil, 1938.
Most goals scored in a qualifying match
13, Archie Thompson ( Australia), vs American Samoa, 2002 OFC Group 1.
Most goals scored in a final match
3, Geoff Hurst ( England), vs West Germany, 1966.
Most goals scored in all final matches
3, Vavá ( Brazil), 2 vs Sweden in 1958 & 1 vs Czechoslovakia in 1962; Pelé ( Brazil), 2 vs Sweden in 1958 & 1 vs Italy in 1970; Geoff Hurst ( England), 3 vs West Germany in 1966 and Zinedine Zidane ( France), 2 vs Brazil in 1998 & 1 vs Italy in 2006.
Scored goal(s) in multiple final matches
Vavá ( Brazil, 1958 & 1962), Pelé ( Brazil, 1958 & 1970), Paul Breitner ( West Germany, 1974 & 1982) and Zinedine Zidane ( France, 1998 & 2006).
Most matches with at least one goal
11, Ronaldo ( Brazil, 1998–2006), Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014).
Most consecutive matches with at least one goal
6, Just Fontaine ( France, 1958) and Jairzinho ( Brazil, 1970).
Most matches with at least two goals
4, Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary, 1954), Just Fontaine ( France, 1958), Ronaldo ( Brazil, 1998–2006) and Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2010).
Most consecutive matches with at least two goals
4, Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary, 1954).
Most hat-tricks
2, Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary, 1954), Just Fontaine ( France, 1958), Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 1970) and Gabriel Batistuta ( Argentina, 1994 & 1998).
Most consecutive hat-tricks
2, Sándor Kocsis ( Hungary, 1954) and Gerd Müller ( West Germany, 1970).
Fastest hat-trick
8 minutes, László Kiss ( Hungary), scored at 69', 72' and 76', vs El Salvador, 1982.
Most goals scored by a substitute in a match
3, László Kiss ( Hungary), vs El Salvador, 1982.
Olympic Goals (Goals From a Corner) scored in a World Cup
1, Marcos Coll ( Colombia), vs Soviet Union, 1962.
Hat-tricks from the penalty spot
Never occurred in the final tournament. Four times in qualification: Kubilay Türkyilmaz (  Switzerland), vs Faroe Islands, 7 October 2000, 2002 UEFA Group 1; Henrik Larsson ( Sweden), vs Moldova, 6 June 2001, 2002 UEFA Group 4; Ronaldo ( Brazil), vs Argentina, 2 June 2004, 2006 CONMEBOL; Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang ( Gabon), vs Niger, 15 June 2013, 2014 CAF Second Round Group E.
Scoring in every match of a team in a World Cup (at least three matches)
György Sárosi ( Hungary), 5 goals in 4 matches (1938),[10] Arne Nyberg ( Sweden), 3 goals in 3 matches (1938),[11] Alcides Ghiggia ( Uruguay), 4 goals in 4 matches (1950),[12] Just Fontaine ( France), 13 goals in 6 matches (1958),[13] Omar Oreste Corbatta ( Argentina), 3 goals in 3 matches (1958),[14] Ferenc Bene ( Hungary), 4 goals in 4 matches (1966),[15] Jairzinho ( Brazil), 7 goals in 6 matches (1970),[16] Teofilo Cubillas ( Peru), 5 goals in 4 matches (1970),[17] James Rodríguez ( Colombia), 6 goals in 5 matches (2014).[18]
Most tournaments with at least one goal
4, Pelé ( Brazil, 1958–1970), Uwe Seeler ( West Germany, 1958–1970) and Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014).
Most tournaments with at least two goals
4, Uwe Seeler ( West Germany, 1958–1970) and Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2014).
Most tournaments with at least three goals
3, Jürgen Klinsmann ( Germany, 1990–1998), Ronaldo ( Brazil, 1998–2006) and Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2010).
Most tournaments with at least four goals
3, Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 2002–2010).
Most tournaments with at least five goals
2, Teófilo Cubillas ( Peru, 1970, 1978), Miroslav Klose ( Germany, (2002–2006) and Thomas Müller ( Germany, 2010–2014).
Most qualification tournaments with at least one goal
5, Carlos Ruiz ( Guatemala, 2002–2018).
Longest period between a player's first and last goals
12 years, 1 month and 7 days; Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 1 June 2002 – 8 July 2014)
Longest period between a player's first and last goals overall
12 years, Uwe Seeler ( West Germany, 8 June 1958 – 14 June 1970), Pelé ( Brazil, 19 June 1958 – 21 June 1970), Diego Maradona ( Argentina, 18 June 1982 – 21 June 1994), Michael Laudrup ( Denmark, 8 June 1986 – 24 June 1998), Henrik Larsson ( Sweden, 16 July 1994 – 20 June 2006), Sami Al-Jaber ( Saudi Arabia, 25 June 1994 – 14 June 2006), Cuauhtémoc Blanco ( Mexico, 20 June 1998 – 17 June 2010), Miroslav Klose ( Germany, 1 June 2002 – 8 July 2014) and Ivica Olić ( Croatia, 8 June 2002 – 18 June 2014).
Longest period between one goal and another
12 years, Michael Laudrup ( Denmark, 1986–1998) and Ivica Olić ( Croatia, 2002–2014).
First goalscorer
Lucien Laurent ( France), vs Mexico, 13 July 1930.
Youngest goalscorer
17 years, 7 months and 27 days, Pelé ( Brazil), vs Wales, 19 June 1958.
Youngest hat-trick scorer
17 years, 8 months and 1 day, Pelé ( Brazil), vs France, 24 June 1958.
Youngest goalscorer, final
17 years, 8 months and 6 days, Pelé ( Brazil), vs Sweden, 29 June 1958.
Oldest goalscorer
42 years, 1 month and 8 days, Roger Milla ( Cameroon), vs Russia, 28 June 1994.
Oldest hat-trick scorer
33 years, 5 months and 8 days, Tore Keller ( Sweden), vs Cuba, 12 June 1938.[19]
Oldest goalscorer, final
35 years, 8 months and 21 days, Nils Liedholm ( Sweden), vs Brazil, 29 June 1958.
Most penalties scored (excluding during shootouts)
4, Eusébio ( Portugal, 4 in 1966), Rob Rensenbrink ( Netherlands, 4 in 1978) – both records for one tournament – and Gabriel Batistuta ( Argentina, 2 each in 1994 & 1998).
Most penalties missed (excluding during shootouts)
2, Asamoah Gyan ( Ghana), vs Czech Republic, 2006 and vs Uruguay, 2010.
First substitute winning goalscorer, final
came on 86th minute, Mario Götze ( Germany), vs Argentina, 2014.
Fastest goal from kickoff
11 seconds, Hakan Şükür ( Turkey), vs South Korea, 2002.
Fastest goal by a substitute
16 seconds, Ebbe Sand ( Denmark), vs Nigeria, 1998.
Fastest goal in a final
90 seconds, Johan Neeskens ( Netherlands), vs West Germany, 1974.
Fastest goal in a qualifying match
8.1 seconds, Christian Benteke ( Belgium), vs Gibraltar, 2018 UEFA Group H.[20]
Fastest brace scored
69 seconds, Toni Kroos ( Germany), vs Brazil, 2014.
Latest goal from kickoff
121st minute, Alessandro Del Piero ( Italy), vs Germany, 2006 and Abdelmoumene Djabou ( Algeria), vs Germany, 2014.
Latest goal from kickoff in a final
120th minute, Geoff Hurst ( England), vs Germany, 1966 (see "they think it's all over").
Latest goal from kickoff, with no goals scored between
119th minute, David Platt ( England), vs Belgium, 1990 and Fabio Grosso ( Italy), vs Germany, 2006.
Latest goal from kickoff in a final, with no goals scored between
116th minute, Andrés Iniesta ( Spain), vs Netherlands, 2010.

Own goals[edit]

Penalty shootouts[edit]

Notes[edit]

References and footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Final matches overview" (PDF). FIFA.com. Retrieved 1 July 2016. 
  2. ^ "FIFA World Cup Golden Ball Awards". RSSSF. Retrieved 1 July 2016. 
  3. ^ "Pele and Greaves to get World Cup winners medals". The Guardian. London. 25 November 2007. 
  4. ^ Pelé, Lothar Matthäus, Pierre Littbarski and Ronaldo each appeared 3 times in the squads of the teams that reached the finals, but none of them played in all three games.
  5. ^ "2018 FIFA World Cup Russia™ - FIFA.com". FIFA.com.  line feed character in |title= at position 28 (help)
  6. ^ FIFA official records claimed he was born in 1987, but some sources claimed he was born in 1985, which would mean he was 15 years and 320 days old when he played the match.
  7. ^ According to RSSSF's 1994 World Cup page, Fuad Amin of Saudi Arabia would have been the youngest captain, at 21 years & 250 days in the 1994, but the source does not specify the match in which he was captain. It is listed that the starting captain was substituted in both the match against the Netherlands and the one against Sweden, in which Amin may have been given the armband on the captains' substitutions, but this information has not been verified. In any case, Meola still is the youngest starting captain, and players who received the captain's armband during the course of the match are generally not regarded as official captains.
  8. ^ According to "FIFA World Cup Superlatives: Players". A FIFA report, however, indicates that Taylor participated in another match after that date, again versus St. Kitts and Nevis, on 31 March 2004, breaking his own record. If the age listed in the "Superlatives" (PDF) file corresponds to the February match, then in accordance with the match report from March the actual record would be 46 years and 222 days.
  9. ^ "Ruiz nets five goals in historic performance, but Guatemala ousted". CONCACAF. 7 September 2016. Retrieved 17 October 2016. 
  10. ^ György Sárosi
  11. ^ 1938 FIFA World Cup
  12. ^ Alcides Ghiggia
  13. ^ Just Fontaine
  14. ^ Orestes Omar Corbatta
  15. ^ Ferenc Bene
  16. ^ Jairzinho
  17. ^ Teófilo Cubillas
  18. ^ James Rodríguez
  19. ^ Some sources such as RSSSF indicated that it was Harry Andersson but not Tore Keller who scored a hat-trick in that match. (link)
  20. ^ http://www.fifa.com/worldcup/news/y=2016/m=10/news=a-historic-goal-on-a-day-of-battles-2842444.html

External links[edit]