FK Mladá Boleslav

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FK Mladá Boleslav
Mlada boleslav.png
Full nameFotbalový klub Mladá Boleslav a.s.
Nickname(s)Bolka
Founded1902; 117 years ago (1902)
GroundLokotrans Aréna,
Mladá Boleslav
Capacity5,000
ChairmanJosef Dufek
ManagerJozef Weber
LeagueCzech First League
2018–197th
WebsiteClub website

FK Mladá Boleslav is a Czech football club based in the city of Mladá Boleslav [ˈmladaː ˈbolɛslaf]. The club currently plays in the Czech First League.

Mladá Boleslav were runners up in the 2005–06 Czech First League and went on to play in the 2006–07 UEFA Champions League, winning their opening tie against Vålerenga although they were eliminated in the third qualifying round by Galatasaray. The club won the Czech Cup in 2011 and qualified for the 2011–12 UEFA Europa League, although they were defeated over two legs by AEK Larnaca.

History[edit]

Recent times[edit]

The team was promoted to Czech First League for the first time in its history in 2004 and in their first top-flight season fought against relegation, eventually finishing in 14th place.[1] The club's greatest success was achieved in the 2005–06 season, as they finished runners-up in the Czech First League, earning a place in the qualifying rounds of the UEFA Champions League. They came through their first tie, defeating Vålerenga (3–1 and 2–2), then lost against Galatasaray (2–5 away, 1–1 home), dropping into the UEFA Cup first round. The club went on to achieve a surprising 4–3 aggregate victory over Marseille (1st leg: 0–1, 2nd leg 4–2). However, the team was eliminated after reaching the group stage, taking just 3 points from 4 matches (Panathinaikos 0–1, Hapoel Tel Aviv 1–1, Paris Saint-Germain 0–0, Rapid București 1–1).[citation needed]

The following season, the club qualified directly for the first round of the UEFA Cup after finishing 3rd in the league. (Luboš Pecka was the top goalscorer in the league that year.) Qualification for the group stage was only narrowly secured by beating Palermo 4–2 on penalties after a nail biting 1–1 aggregate scoreline. On the verge of being eliminated with the score reading 1–0 Palermo, (with their goal in the first leg still standing) in the 2nd leg, Tomáš Sedláček scored the winner in the 2nd leg with only seconds to spare. In their group Mladá Boleslav defeated IF Elfsborg 3–1, but again failed to reach the knockout stages of the competition after losing matches against Villarreal 1–2, AEK Athens 0–1 and Fiorentina 1–2. The club subsequently achieved a 7th place league finish in the 2007–08 season, missing out on European qualification.[citation needed]

The major sponsor of the club is Škoda Auto.[2]

Historical names[edit]

[3]

  • 1902 – SSK Mladá Boleslav (Studentský sportovní klub Mladá Boleslav)
  • 1910 – Mladoboleslavský SK (Mladoboleslavský Sportovní klub)
  • 1919 – Aston Villa Mladá Boleslav
  • 1948 – Sokol Aston Villa Mladá Boleslav
  • 1949 – ZSJ AZNP Mladá Boleslav (Základní sportovní jednota Automobilové závody národní podnik Mladá Boleslav) – merged with Sokol Slavoj Mladá Boleslav and Sokol Meteor Čejetičky
  • 1950 – merged with Sokol Mladoboleslavský
  • 1959 – TJ Spartak Mladá Boleslav AZNP (Tělovýchovná jednota Spartak Mladá Boleslav Automobilové závody národní podnik)
  • 1965 – TJ Škoda Mladá Boleslav (Tělovýchovná jednota Škoda Mladá Boleslav)
  • 1971 – TJ AŠ Mladá Boleslav (Tělovýchovná jednota Auto Škoda Mladá Boleslav)
  • 1990 – FK Mladá Boleslav (Fotbalový klub Mladá Boleslav)
  • 1992 – FK Slavia Mladá Boleslav (Fotbalový klub Slavia Mladá Boleslav)
  • 1994 – FK Bohemians Mladá Boleslav (Fotbalový klub Bohemians Mladá Boleslav)
  • 1995 – FK Mladá Boleslav (Fotbalový klub Mladá Boleslav)

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

As of 18 July 2019[4]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
5 Russia DF Aleksei Tatayev (on loan from Krasnodar)
7 Czech Republic MF Tomáš Wiesner (on loan from Sparta Prague)
8 Czech Republic MF Marek Matějovský
9 Czech Republic MF Tomáš Ladra
10 Bosnia and Herzegovina FW Muris Mešanović
11 Russia FW Nikolay Komlichenko
12 Czech Republic MF Michal Hubínek
13 Czech Republic GK Jan Stejskal
15 Czech Republic FW Tomáš Wágner
16 Czech Republic DF Dominik Hašek
18 Czech Republic MF Jakub Fulnek
19 Czech Republic FW Adam Provazník
20 Austria MF Jonas Auer
22 Czech Republic DF Ladislav Takács
No. Position Player
23 Czech Republic MF Lukáš Budínský
24 Czech Republic MF Pavel Bucha (on loan from Viktoria Plzeň)
25 Brazil DF Marco Túlio
26 Czech Republic MF David Pech
27 Czech Republic FW Jiří Klíma
28 Brazil MF Ewerton
29 Czech Republic DF Jakub Klíma
31 Czech Republic DF Philipp Tvaroh
32 Czech Republic DF Jan Král
33 Czech Republic GK Jan Šeda
34 Czech Republic DF Antonín Křapka
36 Czech Republic DF Daniel Pudil
99 Czech Republic GK Petr Mikulec

Out on loan[edit]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
Czech Republic MF David Novák (at Vysočina Jihlava)
Czech Republic MF Dominik Mašek (at Fastav Zlín)
Czech Republic MF Petr Mareš (at Teplice)

Notable former players[edit]

For all players with a Wikipedia article, see Category:FK Mladá Boleslav players

Player records[edit]

As of 15 July 2019.[5]

Highlighted players are in the current squad.

Most clean sheets in Czech First League[edit]

# Name Clean sheets
1 Czech Republic Miroslav Miller 64
2 Czech Republic Jan Šeda 28
3 Czech Republic Jakub Diviš 13

Current technical staff[edit]

Managers[edit]

History in domestic competitions[edit]

  • Seasons spent at Level 1 of the football league system: 14
  • Seasons spent at Level 2 of the football league system: 6
  • Seasons spent at Level 3 of the football league system: 3
  • Seasons spent at Level 4 of the football league system: 2

Czech Republic[edit]

Season League Placed Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Cup
1993–94 3. liga 9th 34 7 17 10 38 46 –8 31 Round of 32
1994–95 3. liga 15th 34 7 12 15 34 53 –19 33 Round of 64
1995–96 4. liga 9th 30 11 7 12 41 38 +3 40 First Round
1996–97 4. liga 1st 30 23 6 1 67 16 +51 75 First Round
1997–98 3. liga 1st 34 19 7 8 41 26 +15 64 Round of 32
1998–99 2. liga 10th 30 9 7 14 23 30 –7 34 Round of 16
1999–00 2. liga 13th 30 7 12 11 31 40 –9 33 Round of 64
2000–01 2. liga 11th 30 9 9 12 34 42 –8 36 First Round
2001–02 2. liga 3rd 30 15 7 8 40 29 +11 52 Quarter-finals
2002–03 2. liga 3rd 30 13 11 6 37 22 +15 50 First Round
2003–04 2. liga 1st 30 16 7 7 50 24 +26 55 Round of 64
2004–05 1. liga 14th 30 6 13 11 26 35 –9 31 Round of 16
2005–06 1. liga 2nd 30 16 6 8 50 36 +14 54 Round of 64
2006–07 1. liga 3rd 30 17 7 6 48 27 +21 58 Quarter-finals
2007–08 1. liga 7th 30 11 9 10 37 36 +1 42 Round of 16
2008–09 1. liga 6th 30 12 10 8 39 38 +1 46 Round of 64
2009–10 1. liga 8th 30 11 6 13 47 41 +6 39 Round of 64
2010–11 1. liga 5th 30 13 7 10 49 40 +9 46 Winners
2011–12 1. liga 4th 30 15 5 10 49 34 +15 50 Quarter-finals
2012–13 1. liga 8th 30 10 8 12 34 43 –9 38 Runners-up
2013–14 1. liga 3rd 30 14 8 8 54 38 +16 50 Quarter-finals
2014–15 1. liga 4th 30 13 7 10 43 34 +9 46 Semi-finals
2015–16 1. liga 4th 30 16 9 5 63 37 +26 57 Winners
2016–17 1. liga 4th 30 13 10 7 47 37 +10 49 Semi-finals
2017–18 1. liga 9th 30 9 7 14 31 43 -12 34 Semi-finals
2018–19 1. liga 7th 30 11 9 10 52 44 +8 42 Round of 32

History in European competitions[edit]

Season Competition Round Opponent Home Away Aggregate
2006–07 UEFA Champions League 2Q Norway Vålerenga 3–1 2–2 5–3
3Q Turkey Galatasaray 1–1 2–5 3–6
2006–07 UEFA Cup 1R France Marseille 4–2 0–1 4–3
Group G Greece Panathinaikos 0–1 5th
Romania Rapid București 1–1
France Paris Saint-Germain 0–0
Israel Hapoel Tel Aviv 1–1
2007–08 UEFA Cup 1R Italy Palermo 0–1 1–0 (a.e.t.) 1–1 (4–2 p)
Group C Spain Villarreal 1–2 4th
Sweden Elfsborg 3–1
Greece AEK Athens 0–1
Italy Fiorentina 1–2
2011–12 UEFA Europa League 3Q Cyprus AEK Larnaca 2–2 0–3 2–5
2012–13 UEFA Europa League 2Q Iceland Þór Akureyri 3–0 1–0 4–0
3Q Netherlands Twente Enschede 0–2 0–2 0–4
2014–15 UEFA Europa League 2Q Bosnia and Herzegovina Široki Brijeg 2–1 4–0 6–1
3Q France Lyon 1–4 1–2 2–6
2015–16 UEFA Europa League 2Q Norway Strømsgodset 1–2 1–0 2–2 (a.g.)
2016–17 UEFA Europa League 3Q North Macedonia Shkëndija 1–0 0–2 1–2
2017–18 UEFA Europa League 2Q Republic of Ireland Shamrock Rovers 2–0 3–2 5–2
3Q Albania Skënderbeu 2–1 1–2 (a.e.t.) 3–3 (2–4 p)
2019–20 UEFA Europa League 2Q
Notes
  • 2Q: Second qualifying round
  • 3Q: Third qualifying round
  • PO: Play-off round

Honours[edit]

Winners (2): 2010–11, 2015–16
Winners: 2003–04
Winners: 1997–98

Club records[edit]

Czech First League records[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jeřábek, Luboš (2006). Český a československý fotbal – lexikon osobností a klubů (in Czech). Prague, Czech Republic: Grada Publishing. p. 126. ISBN 978-80-247-1656-5.
  2. ^ http://www.fkmb.cz/klub.php
  3. ^ "Club history". FK Mladá Boleslav. Retrieved 12 May 2019.
  4. ^ "Soupiska týmu". FK Mladá Boleslav. Retrieved 1 May 2019.
  5. ^ "Detailed stats". Fortuna liga.

External links[edit]