FMW Brass Knuckles Heavyweight Championship

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FMW World Brass Knuckles Heavyweight Championship
Details
PromotionFrontier Martial-Arts Wrestling
Date establishedJanuary 7, 1990[1]
Date retiredAugust 25, 1999[2]
Other name(s)
WWA Brass Knuckles Heavyweight Championship[1]
WWA World Martial Arts Heavyweight Championship[3]

The FMW World Brass Knuckles Heavyweight Championship was a premiere championship in the wrestling promotion Frontier Martial-Arts Wrestling (FMW).

Title history[edit]

Names[edit]

Name Years
WWA Brass Knuckles Heavyweight Championship January 7, 1990–February 27, 1991
WWA World Martial Arts Heavyweight Championship February 27, 1991–August 28, 1993
FMW Brass Knuckles Heavyweight Championship August 28, 1993–December 12, 1996
FMW Double Championship December 12, 1996–May 18, 1999
FMW Brass Knuckles Heavyweight Championship May 18, 1999–August 25, 1999

Reigns[edit]

Key
No. Overall reign number
Reign Reign number for the specific champion
Days Number of days held
No. Champion Championship change Reign statistics Notes Ref.
Date Event Location Reign Days
1 Beast the Barbarian January 7, 1990 Battle Resistance - 1st Open Tournament Tokyo 1 10 Recognized as first champion. [1]
2 Atsushi Onita January 17, 1990 House show Tokyo 1 406 The title was renamed WWA World Martial Arts Heavyweight Championship on February 27, 1991. [1]
3 Grigory Verichev February 27, 1991 House show Tokyo 1 91 [3]
4 Atsushi Onita May 29, 1991 House show Tokyo 1 231 [3]
5 Big Titan January 15, 1992 House show Kobe, Hyogo 1 15 [3]
6 Tarzan Goto January 30, 1992 House show Tokyo 1 55 [3]
7 Leon Spinks March 25, 1992 House show Tokyo 1 60 [3]
8 Atsushi Onita May 24, 1992 House show Tokyo 3 32 [3]
9 The Sheik June 25, 1992 House show Sapporo, Hokkaido 1 [Note 1] [3]
10 Tiger Jeet Singh August 1992 House show Sapporo, Hokkaido 1 [Note 2] The Sheik rewarded the title to Tiger Jeet Singh for helping him in beating Atsushi Onita for the title. [3]
11 Atsushi Onita N/A 3rd Anniversary Show Yokohama, Kanagawa 4 337 Title replaced by the FMW World Brass Knuckles Heavyweight Championship. [3]
12 Atsushi Onita August 22, 1993 Summer Spectacular Osaka 5 137 Onita defeated Mr. Pogo to become the first FMW World Brass Knuckles Heavyweight Champion. [2]
13 Mr. Pogo January 6, 1994 House show Tokyo 1 244 [2]
14 Atsushi Onita September 7, 1994 House show Sapporo, Hokkaido 6 136 [2]
15 Mr. Pogo January 21, 1995 House show Sendai, Miyagi 2 103 [2]
16 Atsushi Onita May 4, 1995 House show Sendai, Miyagi 7 1 [2]
Vacated May 5, 1995 6th Anniversary Show Kawasaki, Kanagawa Atsushi Onita vacated the title due to his retirement. [2]
17 Hayabusa June 27, 1995 House show Tokyo 1 <1 Hayabusa defeated Hisakatsu Oya for the vacant title. [2]
Vacated June 27, 1995 House show Tokyo Hayabusa vacated the title due to injury. [2]
18 The Gladiator September 26, 1995 Grand Slam tour Tokyo 1 101 Gladiator defeated Hayabusa in the finals of a Grand Slam Tournament. [2]
Vacated January 5, 1996 House show Tokyo The Gladiator vacated the title due to injury. [2]
19 Super Leather February 23, 1996 House show Tokyo 1 94 Leather defeated Hisakatsu Oya for the vacant title. [2]
20 The Gladiator May 27, 1996 House show Fukuoka, Fukuoka 2 489 Gladiator unified the title with the FMW Independent Heavyweight Championship by defeating W*ING Kanemura on December 11, 1996 and the title was renamed to Double Championship. This was the longest reign of the Brass Knuckles Heavyweight Championship. [2]
21 Masato Tanaka September 28, 1997 Fall Spectacular Kawasaki, Kanagawa 1 100 [2]
22 Mr. Gannosuke January 6, 1998 New Year Generation tour Tokyo 1 114 [2]
23 Hayabusa April 30, 1998 9th Anniversary Show Yokohama, Kanagawa 2 204 [2]
24 Kodo Fuyuki November 20, 1998 Scramble Survivor tour Yokohama, Kanagawa 1 179 [2]
25 Yukihiro Kanemura May 18, 1999 House show Tokyo 1 97 Kodo Fuyuki relinquished the title due to injury and awarded it to Kanemura. As a result, the title was split from the Independent Heavyweight Championship, reverted to being Brass Knuckles Heavyweight Championship. [2]
26 Hayabusa August 23, 1999 Goodbye Hayabusa II: Hayabusa Graduation Ceremony Tokyo 2 2 [2]
Deactivated August 25, 1999 Goodbye Hayabusa II: Last Match Sapporo, Hokkaido The title was retired and replaced with WEW Heavyweight Championship. [2]

Combined reigns[edit]

Rank Wrestler No. of
reigns
Combined days
1 Atsushi Onita 7 1,280
2 The Gladiator 2 590
3 Mr. Pogo 2 347
4 Hayabusa 3 206
5 Kodo Fuyuki 1 179
6 Mr. Gannosuke 1 114
7 Masato Tanaka 1 100
8 Yukihiro Kanemura 1 97
9 Super Leather 1 94
10 Grigory Verichev 1 90
11 Leon Spinks 1 60
12 Tarzan Goto 1 55
13 Tiger Jeet Singh 1 49
14 The Sheik 1 37
15 Big Titan 1 15
16 Beast the Barbarian 1 10

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ The exact date when The Sheik rewarded the title to Tiger Jeet Singh is uncertain, which means that the championship reign lasted between 37 and 67 days.
  2. ^ The exact date when The Sheik rewarded the title to Tiger Jeet Singh is uncertain, which means that Singh's championship reign lasted between 19 and 49 days.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2000). "Japan: WWA Brass Knuckles Heavyweight Title". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2000). "Japan: FMW Brass Knuckles Title". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2000). "Japan: WWA Martial Arts Heavyweight Title". Wrestling Title Histories. Archeus Communications. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4.

External links[edit]