FREMO

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FREMO H0
Fremo-19417.jpg
Individual FREMO module with standardised end profiles + fixing holes
Scale 3.5 mm to 1 foot
Scale ratio 1:87
Standard(s)
  • H0-Europe (single track)
  • H0-Mainline (double track)
  • FREMO-E (overhead electric)
  • H0-Hafen (industrial)
  • H0fine (finescale)
  • FREMO:87 (finescale)
  • 00fremo (UK 1:76 scenery)
Model gauge
  • 16.5 mm (0.65 in)
  • 9 mm (0.354 in)
Lots of FREMO modules joined together to make a large layout
Meeting during 2010 in the Netherlands with over 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) of track

The Friendship of European railway modellers (Freundeskreis Europäischer MOdellbahner, FREMO) is a modular rail transport modelling standard. Individual track and scenery modules are built to a common standard and are joined together to make larger model railway layouts. The FREMO standards were created following a meeting in Europe in 1981.[1]

Modules are 500 millimetres (20 in) wide, with variable length and viewable from both sides. Each module comes with adjustable legs, to create a uniform top-of-rail height of 1,300 millimetres (51 in) above floor level. Modules are physically joined together using three 12-millimetre-diameter (0.5 in) holes and hand-tightened M8 bolts with washers and wingnuts. The electrical inter-connection uses two Banana connectors per track bus, over which Digital Command Control (DCC) signalling running at 14 volts is used for train control. Track uses Code 83 rails (2.1 mm or 0.083 inches high), with a minimum curve radius of 2,000 millimetres (6 ft 7 in; representing 175 metres or 575 feet @ 1:87) and fixed track centre-line spacing of 46 millimetres (1.8 in; representing 4 metres or 13 feet separation @ 1:87 scale).[2]

Some general aspects, such as rigid construction of modules, are derived from the Normen Europäischer Modellbahnen NEM 900 standards published by MOROP.[3] In 1995, the North American Free-mo standards were based on those of FREMO, with a number of changes made.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Slaughter, Robert (8 February 2004). "Overview" (PDF). A Gentle Guide to the Free-mo Standards. p. 2. Retrieved 1 September 2018.
  2. ^ FREMO H0 – Modular Standard: Standard Gauge 1435 mm in 1:87 (standard) (Report). version 2. 1 December 2013. Retrieved 1 September 2018.
  3. ^ Barkhoff, Reinhold (21 October 2014). "Motive für Module" [Motives for Modules] (PDF). MIBA Spezial. No. 102. Archived from the original on 22 October 2014. Retrieved 3 September 2014.

External links[edit]