FSS Code

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The FSS Code or International Code for Fire Safety Systems is a set of international treaties organised by the International Maritime Organization under the SOLAS Convention that are designed to reduce the risk of fire, and aid in emergency response aboard ships.[1] Some of the components of the code were constructed after some high-profile passenger ship disasters over the last century.

MS Scandinavian Star (after the fire that killed 159 passengers). The disaster led to revisions of the FSS Code

Components[edit]

The FSS Code covers:[2]

  • International shore connection - specifics on how to connect to shores and ports (to refill, and to fight fires while docked).
  • Personal protection - Fire fighting apparel and breathing apparatus.
  • Extinguishing:
    • Fire Extinguishers - Specification of portables extinguishers
    • Fixed gas fire extinguishing systems
    • Fixed foam fire extinguishing systems
    • Fixed pressure water and water spraying systems
    • Auto sprinkler, fire detection and fire alarm systems
    • Fixed Emergency fire pumps
    • Fixed deck foam system
    • Inert gas system
  • Fire detection and alarm systems
  • Sample extraction smoke detection system
  • Low Location Lighting system - for the lower parts of the ship
  • Means of Escape

History[edit]

The FSS Code has been through some evolution:[3]

  • 1914 and 1929 SOLAS Conventions after the RMS Titanic sinking
  • 1948 and 1960 SOLAS Conventions after the Morro Castle sinking in 1934
  • International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea of 1 November 1974, that introduced Chapter II-2 (on construction - fire protection, fire detection and fire extinction)
  • 1981 revision - a rewrite of Chapter II-2
  • 1990 MS Scandinavian Star disaster that led to a revision - Amendments to Chapter II-2 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea of 1 November 1974 (Fire Safety Measures for Existing Passenger Ships) signed in London 10 April 1992[4]
  • International Code for Application of Fire Test Procedures London, 5 December 1996 on laboratory testing of systems.
  • IMO Resolution MSC.327(90): 2012 Amendments to the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code) London, 25 May 2012[5]
  • IMO Resolution MSC.339(91): 2012 Amendments to the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code) London, 30 November 2012[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Brief History". www.imo.org. Retrieved 2 July 2017.
  2. ^ "What is Fire Safety System (FSS) Code on Ships?". Marine Insight. 24 February 2011. Retrieved 2 July 2017.
  3. ^ "History of fire protection requirements". www.imo.org. Retrieved 2 July 2017.
  4. ^ "Amendments to Chapter II-2 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea of 1 November 1974 (Fire Safety Measures for Existing Passenger Ships) (London, 10 April 1992) [1994] ATS 45". www3.austlii.edu.au. Retrieved 2 July 2017.
  5. ^ "2012 Amendments to the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code) IMO Resolution MSC.327(90) (London, 25 May 2012) - [2014] ATS 27". www.austlii.edu.au. Retrieved 2 July 2017.
  6. ^ "2012 Amendments to the International Code for Fire Safety Systems (FSS Code) IMO Resolution MSC.339(91) (London, 30 November 2012) - [2014] ATS 24". www.austlii.edu.au. Retrieved 2 July 2017.