Fabrizio Bernardi

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Minor planets discovered: 7 [1]
65001 Teodorescu 9 January 2002 MPC [A]
78123 Dimare 10 July 2002 MPC [A]
78309 Alessielisa 5 August 2002 MPC
78453 Bullock 3 September 2002 MPC
99942 Apophis 19 June 2004 MPC [B]
(250370) 2003 TK4 12 October 2003 MPC
(413666) 2005 VJ119 7 November 2005 MPC
A co-discovery with Andrea Boattini
B co-discovery with Roy Tucker and David Tholen

Fabrizio Bernardi (b. 1972) is an Italian astronomer and discoverer of minor planets and comets, best known for the co-discovery of the near-Earth and potentially hazardous asteroid 99942 Apophis.[2]

He is a member of the IAU,[3] and credited by the Minor Planet Center with the discovery of 7 numbered minor planets during 2002–2005,[1] including (280244) 2002 WP11, another near-Earth object a member of the Amor group of asteroids, and (413666) 2005 VJ119, a trans-Neptunian object.[4] In 2002, he discovered the outer main-belt asteroid 65001 Teodorescu at Campo Imperatore station, Gran Sasso, Italy, and named it after his wife, the Romanian astronomer Ana Teodorescu.[5]

He was involved together with colleagues Marco Micheli and David Tholen, with observations of the Mars-crosser asteroid 2007 WD5 during his stay at the University of Hawaii observatory.[6] While at the Mauna Kea Observatories in Hawaii, he discovered 268P/Bernardi, a Jupiter family comet.[7][8]

The main-belt asteroid 27983 Bernardi, discovered by astronomers Andrea Boattini and Maura Tombelli at Cima Ekar, was named in his honor on 9 November 2003 (M.P.C. 50252).[2][9]

Publications[edit]

ACM2002 Proceedings – Berlin: The Campo Imperatore Near Earth Objects Survey (CINEOS): Andrea Boattini, Germano D’Abramo, Giovanni B. Valsecchi, Andrea Carusi, Andrea Di Paola, Fabrizio Bernardi, Robert Jedicke, Alan W. Harris, Elisabetta Dotto and Fiore De Luise, et al.[10] In press. Discovery of the heavily obscured Supernova SN2002CV. Astronomy and Astrophysics, v.393, p.L21-L24[11][12]

Proceedings of the Planetologia Italiana Workshop – Bormio, Italy, 20–26 January 2001: CINEOS – Campo Imperatore Near Earth Objects Survey Expected background of asteroids and stars for the Wide Angle Camera of the Rosetta Mission[13]

Asteroid background for the Wide Angle Camera of the Rosetta Mission, Poster, Division for Planetary Sciences 2001, New Orleans, USA[14]

ESTEC Internal report, September 2000: Image simulation of the inner coma environment for the Wide Angle Camera of the OSIRIS experiment[15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number)". Minor Planet Center. 20 June 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2006). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (27983) Bernardi, Addendum to Fifth Edition: 2003–2005. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 193. ISBN 978-3-540-34361-5. Retrieved 6 August 2016. 
  3. ^ "Individual Members – Fabrizio Bernardi". IAU – International Astronomical Union. 30 April 2015. Retrieved 6 August 2016. 
  4. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 413666 (2005 VJ119)" (2014-08-27 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 6 August 2016. 
  5. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2006). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (65001) Teodorescu, Addendum to Fifth Edition: 2003–2005. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 224. ISBN 978-3-540-34360-8. Retrieved 27 February 2016. 
  6. ^ NASA retrieved 12:31 11.10.11
  7. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 268P/Bernardi". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 6 August 2016. 
  8. ^ "New Comet Discovered from Mauna Kea". University of Hawaii - Institute of Astronomy. 1 December 2005. Retrieved 6 August 2016. 
  9. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 6 August 2016. 
  10. ^ Springer, Part of Springer Science+Business Media retrieved 14:32 11.10.11
  11. ^ ESO 2002 retrieved 13:18 11.10.11
  12. ^ homepage retrieved 13:03 11.10.11
  13. ^ homepage retrieved 13:03 11.10.11
  14. ^ homepage retrieved 13:03 11.10.11
  15. ^ homepage retrieved 13:03 11.10.11