Facebook F8

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Facebook F8 (pronounced "eff eight") is a mostly-annual conference held by Facebook, intended for developers and entrepreneurs who build products and services around the website. It takes place in San Francisco, California.[1] Previous events have started with a keynote speech by Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, followed by various breakout sessions concentrating on specific topics. Facebook has often introduced new features, and made new announcements, at the conference.

The scheduling of F8 has been somewhat erratic. No conferences were held in 2009, 2012 or 2013, and the date for the 2011 conference was announced late.[2][3][4]

2007[edit]

This was the first F8 event, held May 24, 2007, at the San Francisco Design Center in San Francisco. The notion of the social graph was introduced.

2008[edit]

The 2008 F8 event was held July 23, 2008, at the San Francisco Design Center once again. News and announcements from this event included:

  • Introducing the New Facebook Profile & More
  • Integrating Facebook Connect into your Website

2010[edit]

The 2010 F8 event was held April 21, 2010 at the San Francisco Design Center. The main announcement was the feature to add a “Like” button to any piece of content on a website by the owner. This feature is now integrated within around 2.5 million websites worldwide, with 10,000 more being added daily.

Additional news and announcements included:

  • Social Plugins (e.g. Like button)
  • Open Graph Protocol
  • Graph API
  • OAuth 2.0

2011[edit]

F8 2011 was held on September 22, 2011. Various things Facebook introduced at the conference included a new profile redesign named 'Timeline' that showed a history of user's activity on their profile, and a broader, more advanced version of the 'Open Graph' protocol.

The F8 2011 event was mainly focused on introducing new products, transforming industries, building and growing social applications and product Q&A. Some of the details of the topics were:

  • The Future of Digital Music
  • Mobile + Social
  • The Rise of Social Gaming
  • Investing in Social
  • Developing Products at Facebook
  • Social Design
  • Distribution: Growing on Facebook
  • Marketing on Facebook
  • Hack Better: New Tools for Developers
  • Inside HTML5 Development at Facebook
  • Making Fast Social Apps

2014[edit]

F8 2014 was announced on March 8, 2014 by Facebook representative Ilya Sukhar that the F8 event would return on April 30.[5]

The conference was focused on Facebook's strategy to become a 'cross-platform platform'.[6]

Here is a list of the main topics:

  • Audience Network
  • Autofill With Facebook
  • Anonymous Login
  • Removing The Ability To Pull Friends' Data
  • Granular Mobile Privacy Permissions
  • 2-Year Core API Stability Guarantee
  • Graph API 2.0
  • FbStart
  • Mobile Like Button
  • Send to Mobile
  • Message Dialog
  • AppLinks
  • Visualization APIs For Media
  • Pricing changes
  • Analytics and Offline Storage
  • Internet.org Innovation Lab
  • DisplayNode

2015[edit]

The 2015 F8 conference was held on March 25, 2015 at the Fort Mason Center.

2017[edit]

The 2017 F8 conference will take place from April 18, 2017 to April 19, 2017, in San Jose, California.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ f8In Review: f8 2010TijdlijnOver Facebook. "f8 - In Review: f8 2010". Facebook. Retrieved July 8, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Sorry, Developers: Don't Expect Facebook's F8 Conference This Year - Mike Isaac - Social". AllThingsD. September 17, 2012. Retrieved July 8, 2013. 
  3. ^ Zach Walton (September 18, 2012). "Facebook Skips On Hosting The F8 Conference This Year". WebProNews. Retrieved July 8, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Destiny be damned, Facebook not holding f8 this year". VentureBeat. Retrieved July 8, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Facebook to Hold F8 Developer Conference on April 30". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved November 3, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Everything Facebook Launched At f8 And Why". TechCrunch. Retrieved June 3, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Facebook Developer Conference 2017". Retrieved January 31, 2017. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]