Faith Brook

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Faith Brook
FaithBrook.jpg
Born(1922-02-16)16 February 1922
York, Yorkshire, England
Died11 March 2012(2012-03-11) (aged 90)
London, England
OccupationActress
Years active1941–2006

Faith Brook (16 February 1922 – 11 March 2012) was an English actress who appeared on stage, in films and on television, generally in upper-class roles. She was the daughter of actor Clive Brook.

Early years[edit]

Although she was born in York, England, she was raised in Hollywood.[1] Her father was the actor Clive Brook, and her brother Lyndon Brook was also an actor.[2][3]

Brook was educated in Los Angeles, London and Gstaad, Switzerland.[4] As a teenager, she studied at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art.[1]

Film[edit]

Brook's screen debut came via a bit part in Suspicion (1941).[1] Her first credited film appearance was The Jungle Book in 1942. The Encyclopedia of British Film described her as being cast "almost invariably in well-bred roles ..."[5]

Stage[edit]

In September 1941, Brook debuted on stage in Lottie Dundass in Santa Barbara.[4]

During World War II, Brook served in Britain's Auxiliary Territorial Service. Following that, she acted in the Bristol Old Vic.[5] Later, in London, she joined the company of The Old Vic.[4]

She also appeared on stage in The Colour of Poppies and in Uncle Vanya in 2008.[6]

Her Broadway credits include The Cocktail Party (1949), You Never Can Tell (1947), and Letters to Lucerne (1941).[7]

Television[edit]

Brook portrayed Julia Naughton in the American television series Claudia (1952).[8] In Britain, she appeared on War and Peace (1972) on the BBC and The Irish RM on Channel 4, among other programmes.[4]

Personal life[edit]

Brook was married twice, first to Charles Moffett and then later to Michael Horowitz. Brook and her second husband had a son, Stephen B. Horowitz (British birth records)/>

She was a supporter of the British Humanist Association.

Selected filmography[edit]

Selected television credits[edit]

Year Title Role Episode(s)
1949 Martin Kane, Private Eye Millie Talbot "The Nevans Murder Trail "
1950 Ripley's Believe It or Not! Unknown role "Murder by Moonlight"
1950-1951 Ford Theatre Unknown roles "Heart of Darkness"
"Dead on the Vine"
1949-1951 Studio One Sally Athelny
Joan Bridges
Edith Bastin
Ethel Mummery
"Of Human Bondage"
"The Willow Cabin "
"Away from It All"
"Mr. Mummery's Suspicion"
1950-1951 Kraft Television Theatre Unknown roles "The Great Broxopp"
"Mrs. Dane's Defense"
"Dear Brutus"
1951-1952 Robert Montgomery Presents Unknown roles "An Inspector Calls"
"Happy Birthday, George"
"The Law-Abiding"
1957 White Hunter Patricia "Big Bwana Brady "
1958 Saturday Playhouse Connie Crawford "Heroes Don't Care"
1958 Sunday Night Theatre Ida Hay "Honour Bright"
1959 The Invisible Man Carol Norton "Picnic with Death"
1961 Alcoa Presents: One Step Beyond Nurse "The Prisoner"
1964 Dr. Finlay's Casebook Fanny Senlac "A Present from Father"
1974 Thriller Betty Cornfield "In the Steps of a Dead Man"
1984 The Weather in the Streets Lady Spencer TV film
1991 Miss Marple Ruth van Rydock "They Do It With Mirrors"
1993 Zorro Ynez Risendo "The Arrival"
"Conundrum"
"The Discovery"

Selected radio[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Lentz, Harris M. III (19 April 2013). Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2012. McFarland. pp. 42–43. ISBN 9781476603858. Retrieved 16 March 2017.
  2. ^ Shorter, Eric (20 February 2004). "Lyndon Brook". The Guardian. Retrieved 22 May 2011.
  3. ^ Obituary: Faith Brook, Daily Telegraph, 13 March 2012
  4. ^ a b c d Billington, Michael (14 March 2012). "Faith Brook obituary". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 16 March 2017. Retrieved 16 March 2017.
  5. ^ a b McFarlane, Brian (2016). The Encyclopedia of British Film: Fourth edition. Oxford University Press. p. 101. ISBN 9781526111975. Retrieved 16 March 2017.
  6. ^ Nightingale, Benedict (26 January 2008). "Uncle Vanya". The Times. Retrieved 22 May 2011.
  7. ^ "("Faith Brook" search results)". Playbill Vault. Playbill. Archived from the original on 16 March 2017. Retrieved 16 March 2017.
  8. ^ Terrace, Vincent (2011). Encyclopedia of Television Shows, 1925 through 2010 (2nd ed.). Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers. p. 192. ISBN 978-0-7864-6477-7.

External links[edit]