Falkirk High railway station

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"Falkirk High" redirects here. See also Falkirk High School.
Falkirk High National Rail
Falkirk High railway station in 2008.jpg
Location
Place Falkirk
Local authority Falkirk
Coordinates 55°59′30″N 3°47′33″W / 55.9917°N 3.7924°W / 55.9917; -3.7924Coordinates: 55°59′30″N 3°47′33″W / 55.9917°N 3.7924°W / 55.9917; -3.7924
Grid reference NS882791
Operations
Station code FKK
Managed by Abellio ScotRail
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2011/12 Decrease 0.992 million
– Interchange  Decrease 4,103
2012/13 Decrease 0.963 million
– Interchange  Increase 4,929
2013/14 Increase 0.998 million
– Interchange  Decrease 4,890
2014/15 Decrease 0.901 million
– Interchange  Increase 5,220
2015/16 Decrease 0.870 million
– Interchange  Increase 5,348
History
Original company Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway
Pre-grouping North British Railway
Post-grouping LNER
21 February 1842 Opened as Falkirk[1]
1 February 1903 Renamed as Falkirk High[1][2]
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Falkirk High from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
170433 at Edinburgh Waverley.JPG UK Railways portal

Falkirk High railway station is one of the railway stations serving the town of Falkirk in Scotland. It is on the Glasgow to Edinburgh via Falkirk Line and situated on the southern edge of the town, close to the Union Canal.

History[edit]

The station was opened as Falkirk with the Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway on 21 February 1842.[1] Edinburgh-bound services initially terminated at Haymarket, but were subsequently extended to the North British Railway's station at Edinburgh Waverley in 1846.[3] The NBR took over operations in 1865 when it absorbed the E&GR, with the London and North Eastern Railway succeeding it at the 1923 Grouping.

In 1903, the station was renamed as Falkirk High recognising it being one of several stations in the town (the others being Falkirk Grahamston and Camelon on the Polmont to Larbert/Greenhill loop line) and its location above the town.[2]

Services[edit]

Falkirk High station is open (and staffed) seven days per week; at off-peak times eight trains per hour stop, four for Glasgow via Croy and four for Edinburgh via Polmont and Linlithgow. This drops to every half-hour each way in the evenings.

Journey times to Edinburgh vary from 27 minutes to 38 minutes depending on stopping stations and time of day; to Glasgow the journey time is between 18 and 26 minutes.

On Sundays there is a half-hourly service in each direction.[4]

Train services are provided by Abellio ScotRail.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Croy   Abellio ScotRail
Glasgow-Edinburgh Line
  Polmont
Historical railways
Bonnybridge High
Station closed; line open
  Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway
North British Railway
  Polmont
Station and line open

Statue[edit]

Falkirk High station is home to the metal sculpture of "Antonine the Legendary Engine" by George Wyllie. This sculpture is of sufficient importance to be listed and protected by the Railway Heritage Committee.[5]

Trivia[edit]

The station is mentioned in the song "Loneliness Shines" by Malcolm Middleton, in which he calls it his "favourite place".[6]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Butt (1995), page 93
  2. ^ a b Butt (1995), page 94
  3. ^ and Glasgow Railway Railscot Chronology - Edinburgh & Glasgow Railway Railscot; Retrieved 2014-01-29
  4. ^ GB National Rail Timetable May 2016 Edition, Table 228
  5. ^ "Railway Heritage Committee List of Designations, Undertakings, and Disposals (as at 12th August 2011)". Archived from the original on 4 October 2012. Retrieved 25 September 2011. 
  6. ^ "Malcolm Middleton: Into the Woods Lyrics". Archived from the original on 2 April 2012. Retrieved 25 September 2011. {

Sources[edit]