Falls Church, Virginia

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Falls Church, Virginia
Independent city
City of Falls Church
A view off Broad Street (Route 7)
A view off Broad Street (Route 7)
Official seal of Falls Church, Virginia
Seal
Falls Church is located in Northern Virginia
Falls Church
Falls Church
Falls Church is located in Virginia
Falls Church
Falls Church
Falls Church is located in the US
Falls Church
Falls Church
Coordinates: 38°52′56″N 77°10′16″W / 38.88222°N 77.17111°W / 38.88222; -77.17111Coordinates: 38°52′56″N 77°10′16″W / 38.88222°N 77.17111°W / 38.88222; -77.17111
Country  United States of America
State  Virginia
County None (Independent city)
Settled c. 1699
Incorporated (town) 1875
Incorporated (city) 1948
Government
 • Type Council–manager
 • Mayor David Tarter
Area
 • Total 2.0 sq mi (5.2 km2)
 • Land 2.0 sq mi (5.2 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 328 ft (99 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 12,332
 • Estimate (2015) 13,892
 • Density 6,950/sq mi (2,683.5/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 22040, 22042, 22044, 22046
Area code(s) 703 and 571
FIPS code 51-27200
GNIS feature ID 1495526[1]
Website fallschurchva.gov
Sister city is Kokolopori, Democratic Republic of Congo

Falls Church is an independent city in the U.S. state of Virginia.[1] As of the 2010 census, the population was 12,332.[2] The estimated population in 2015 was 13,892.[3] Falls Church is included in the Washington metropolitan area. Falls Church has the lowest level of poverty of any independent city or county in the United States.[4]

Taking its name from The Falls Church, an 18th-century Church of England (later Episcopal Church) parish, Falls Church gained township status within Fairfax County in 1875. In 1948, it was incorporated as the City of Falls Church, an independent city with county-level governance status.[5] It is also referred to as Falls Church City.

The city's corporate boundaries do not include all of the area historically known as Falls Church; these areas include portions of Seven Corners and other portions of the current Falls Church postal districts of Fairfax County, as well as the area of Arlington County known as East Falls Church, which was part of the town of Falls Church from 1875 to 1936.[6] For statistical purposes, the U.S. Department of Commerce's Bureau of Economic Analysis combines the City of Falls Church with Fairfax City and Fairfax County.

At 2 square miles, Falls Church is the smallest incorporated municipality in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

Etymology[edit]

The independent city of Falls Church is named for the 1734 religious institution named The Falls Church founded at the intersection of important Indian trails that were later paved and named Broad Street, Lee Highway and Little Falls Street.[7]

History[edit]

The first known government in the area was the Iroquois Confederacy.[8] After exploration by Captain John Smith, England began sending colonists to what they called Virginia.[9] While no records has yet been found showing the earliest colony settlement in the area, a cottage demolished between 1908 and 1914, two blocks from the city center, bore a stone engraved with the date "1699" set into one of its two large chimneys.[10]

During the American Revolution the area is most known for The Falls Church vestrymen George Washington and George Mason.[11] A copy of the United States Declaration of Independence was read to citizens from the steps of The Falls Church during the summer of 1776.[12]

During the American Civil War Falls Church voted 44–26 in favor of secession.[13] The Confederate Army occupied the then village of Falls Church as well as Munson's and Upton's hills to the East, probably due to their views of Washington, D.C..[14] On September 28, 1861 Confederate troops withdrew from Falls Church and nearby hills, retreating to the heights at Centreville. Union troops took Munson's and Upton's hills, yet the village was never entirely brought under Union rule.[15] Mosby's Raiders made several armed incursions into the heart of Falls Church to kidnap and kill suspected Northern sympathizers in 1864 and 1865.[16]


Historic sites[edit]

Cherry Hill Farmhouse and Barn, an 1845 Greek-Revival farmhouse and 1856 barn, owned and managed by the city of Falls Church, are open to the public select Saturdays in summer.[17] Tinner Hill Arch and Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation represent a locus of early African American history in the area, including the site of the first rural chapter of the NAACP.[citation needed] Two of the District of Columbia's original 1791 boundary stones (see: Boundary Markers of the Original District of Columbia) are located in public parks on the boundary between Falls Church and Arlington County. The West cornerstone stands in Andrew Ellicott Park at 2824 Meridian Street, Falls Church and N. Arizona Street, Arlington, just south of West Street.[18] Stone number SW9 stands in Benjamin Banneker Park on Van Buren Street, south of 18th Street, near the East Falls Church Metro station. Most of Banneker Park is in Arlington County, across Van Buren Street from Isaac Crossman Park at Four Mile Run.[19]

Sites on the National Register of Historic Places[edit]

Site Year built Address Listed
Birch House (Joseph Edward Birch House) 1840 312 East Broad Street 1977
Cherry Hill (John Mills Farm) 1845 312 Park Avenue 1973
The Falls Church 1769 115 East Fairfax Street 1970
Federal District Boundary Marker, SW 9 Stone 1791 18th and Van Buren Streets 1976
Federal District Boundary Marker, West Cornerstone 1791 2824 Meridian Street 1991
Mount Hope 1790s 203 South Oak Street 1984

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.0 square miles (5.2 km2), all land, no water.[20] Falls Church is the smallest independent city by area in Virginia. Since independent cities in Virginia are considered county-equivalents, it is also the smallest county-equivalent in the United States by area.

The center of the city is the crossroads of Virginia State Route 7 (Broad St./Leesburg Pike) and U.S. Route 29 (Washington St./Lee Highway).

Tripps Run, a tributary of the Cameron Run Watershed, drains two-thirds of Falls Church, while the Four Mile Run watershed drains the other third of the city. Four Mile Run flows at the base of Minor's Hill, which overlooks Falls Church on its north, and Upton's Hill, which bounds the area to its east.[21]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Falls Church, Virginia
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 79.9
(26.6)
75.6
(24.2)
82.3
(27.9)
87.4
(30.8)
94.0
(34.4)
101.5
(38.6)
104.3
(40.2)
103.0
(39.4)
98.6
(37)
87.3
(30.7)
79.5
(26.4)
79.8
(26.6)
104.3
(40.2)
Average high °F (°C) 36.0
(2.2)
39.9
(4.4)
49.9
(9.9)
63.2
(17.3)
68.5
(20.3)
79.9
(26.6)
83.9
(28.8)
82.3
(27.9)
74.5
(23.6)
62.7
(17.1)
41.7
(5.4)
37.9
(3.3)
60.03
(15.57)
Daily mean °F (°C) 27.6
(−2.4)
30.0
(−1.1)
39.9
(4.4)
51.5
(10.8)
55.9
(13.3)
68.8
(20.4)
72.4
(22.4)
71.1
(21.7)
62.3
(16.8)
52.7
(11.5)
37.6
(3.1)
29.2
(−1.6)
49.92
(9.94)
Average low °F (°C) 19.2
(−7.1)
20.1
(−6.6)
29.9
(−1.2)
39.8
(4.3)
43.3
(6.3)
55.6
(13.1)
61.0
(16.1)
59.9
(15.5)
50.0
(10)
42.6
(5.9)
33.5
(0.8)
20.4
(−6.4)
39.61
(4.23)
Record low °F (°C) −25.7
(−32.1)
−19
(−28)
−7.1
(−21.7)
0.9
(−17.3)
27.5
(−2.5)
39.3
(4.1)
41.4
(5.2)
38.0
(3.3)
22.1
(−5.5)
12.3
(−10.9)
5.8
(−14.6)
−17.9
(−27.7)
−25.7
(−32.1)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 8.2
(20.8)
5.5
(14)
3.4
(8.6)
1.1
(2.8)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
Trace 5.6
(14.2)
23.8
(60.5)
Source: Climatography of the United States[22]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 660
1890 792 20.0%
1900 1,007 27.1%
1910 1,128 12.0%
1920 1,659 47.1%
1930 2,019 21.7%
1940 2,576 27.6%
1950 7,535 192.5%
1960 10,192 35.3%
1970 10,772 5.7%
1980 9,515 −11.7%
1990 9,578 0.7%
2000 10,377 8.3%
2010 12,332 18.8%
Est. 2016 14,014 [23] 13.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[24]
1790–1960[25] 1900–1990[26]
1990–2000[27] 2010–2013[28]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[29] of 2010, Falls Church City had a population of 12,332. The population density was 6,169.1 people per square mile. There were 5,496 housing units. The racial makeup of the city was 80.6% White, 5.3% Black or African American, 0.5% Native American, 9.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, and 4.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.5% of the population.

In the city, the population was spread out with 7.3% under the age of five, 26.6% under the age of 18, and 11.6% over the age of 65. The percentage of the population that were female was 51%. 74.4% of the population had a bachelor's degree or higher (age 25+).

The median income for a household in the city was $120,000, with 4% of the population below the poverty line, the lowest level of poverty of any independent city or county in the United States.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[30] of 2000, there were 10,377 people, 4,471 households, and 2,620 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,225.8 people per square mile (2,013.4/km²). There were 4,725 housing units at an average density of 2,379.5/sq mi (916.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 84.97% White, 3.28% Black or African American, 0.24% Native American, 6.50% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 2.52% from other races, and 2.43% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.44% of the population.

There were 4,471 households out of which 30.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them; 47.1% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 41.4% were non-families. 33.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the city, the population was spread out with 23.4% under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 31.1% from 25 to 44, 28.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 94.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $74,924, and the median income for a family was $97,225. Males had a median income of $65,227 versus $46,014 for females. The per capita income for the city was $41,051. About 2.8% of families and 4.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.3% of those under age 18 and 4.1% of those age 65 or over.

Economy[edit]

In 2011, Falls Church was named the richest county in the United States, with a median annual household income of $113,313.[31] While Fortune 500 companies General Dynamics and Northrop Grumman and have headquarters with mailing addresses in Falls Church, they are physically in Fairfax County.[32]

Top employers[edit]

According to the city's 2016 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[33] the top employers in the City are:

Employer Employees
Falls Church City Public Schools 576
City of Falls Church 312
BG Healthcare 312
Kaiser Permanente 257
Tax Analysts 182
Koons Ford 167
VL Home Health Care, Inc 160
BJ's Wholesale Club 125
Don Beyer Volvo 119

Arts and culture[edit]

Annual events[edit]

The city holds an annual Memorial Day Parade with bands, military units, civic associations, and fire/rescue stations, in recent years the event has featured a street festival with food, crafts, and non-profit organization booths, and a 3k fun run (the 2009 race drew some 3,000 runners).[34] the Falls Church Farmer's Market is held Saturdays year-round, Jan 3 – April 25 (9 am – Noon), May 2 – Dec 26 (8 am – Noon), at the City Hall Parking Lot, 300 Park Ave. In addition to regional attention,[35] in 2010 the market was ranked first in the medium category of the American Farmland Trust's contest to identify America's Favorite Farmers' Markets.[36]

Cultural institutions[edit]

The Falls Church Village Preservation and Improvement Society was founded in 1885 by Arthur Douglas and re-established in 1965 to promote the history, culture, and beautification of the city. The Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation was founded in 1997 by Edwin B. Henderson, II to preserve the Civil Rights and African American history and culture. Falls Church is where the first rural branch of the NAACP was established stemming from events that took place in 1915, when the town attempted to pass a segregation ordinance by creating segregated districts in the town. The ordinance was not enforced after the U. S. Supreme Court ruling on Buchanan versus Warley, in 1917. The Mary Riley Styles Public Library is Falls Church's public library; established in 1928, its current building was constructed for the purpose in 1958 and expanded in 1993.[37] In addition to its circulating collections, it houses a local history collection, including newspaper files, local government documents, and photographs. The State Theatre stages a wide variety of live performances. Built as a movie house in 1936, it was reputed to be the first air-conditioned theater on the east coast. It closed in 1983; after extensive renovations in the 1990s, including a stage, bar, and restaurant, it re-opened as a music venue.[38]

Government[edit]

Presidential Elections Results[39]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 17.1% 1,324 75.0% 5,819 7.9% 614
2012 29.5% 2,147 68.9% 5,015 1.6% 114
2008 29.2% 1,970 69.6% 4,695 1.3% 85
2004 34.0% 2,074 64.7% 3,944 1.3% 80
2000 38.1% 2,131 55.6% 3,109 6.3% 353
1996 38.4% 1,644 55.4% 2,375 6.2% 265
1992 35.4% 1,912 53.0% 2,864 11.6% 628
1988 49.5% 2,470 49.8% 2,484 0.7% 35
1984 52.6% 2,684 47.0% 2,398 0.4% 19
1980 52.2% 2,485 35.8% 1,703 12.0% 570
1976 50.6% 2,323 48.0% 2,202 1.4% 63
1972 60.0% 2,967 38.3% 1,895 1.6% 81
1968 45.8% 2,005 42.5% 1,860 11.8% 517
1964 35.9% 1,329 64.0% 2,371 0.2% 7
1960 48.2% 1,525 51.5% 1,629 0.4% 11
1956 53.1% 1,462 44.8% 1,233 2.1% 57
1952 59.8% 1,386 40.1% 930 0.0% 1

Falls Church is governed by a seven-member city council, each elected at large for four-year, staggered terms.[40] Council members are typically career professionals holding down full-time jobs.[40] In addition to attending a minimum of 22 council meetings and 22 work sessions each year, they also attend meetings of local boards and commissions and regional organizations (several Council Members serve on committees of regional organizations as well).[40] Members also participate in the Virginia Municipal League and some serve on statewide committees.[40] The mayor is elected by members of the council.[40] The city operates in a typical council-manager form of municipal government, with a city manager hired by the council to serve as the city's chief administrative officer.[40] The city's elected Sheriff is S. Steven Bittle. Candidates for city elections typically do not run under a nationally affiliated party nomination.[40]

City services and functions include education, recreation and parks, library, police, land use, zoning, and building inspections, street maintenance, and storm water and sanitary sewer service. Often named a Tree City USA, the city has one full-time arborist. Some public services are provided by agreement with the city's county neighbors of Arlington and Fairfax, including certain health and human services (Fairfax); and court services, transport, and fire/rescue services (Arlington). The city provided water utility service to a large portion of eastern Fairfax County, including the dense commercial areas of Tysons Corner and Merrifield, until January 2014, when the water utility was sold to the Fairfax County Water Authority.[41]

Education[edit]

The city is served by Falls Church City Public Schools:

Of these four Falls Church City Public Schools, one, Mount Daniel Elementary School, is located outside city limits in neighboring Fairfax County.[42] Falls Church High School is not part of the Falls Church City Public School system, but rather the Fairfax County Public School system; it does not serve the city of Falls Church.

Falls Church City is eligible to send up to three students per year to the Fairfax County magnet school, Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology.[43]

The city is home to Saint James Catholic School, a parochial school serving grades K–8.

Media[edit]

The Falls Church News-Press is a free weekly newspaper founded in 1991 that focuses on local news and commentary and includes nationally syndicated columns.[44] The area is also served by national and regional newspapers, including The Washington Examiner, The Washington Times, and The Washington Post. The City is also served by numerous citizen- and corporate-sponsored Internet blogs. WAMU Radio 88.5 produces news and opinion programs with a local focus.

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Metro train entering East Falls Church station

Although two stations on the Washington Metro's Orange Line have "Falls Church" in their names, neither lies within the City of Falls Church: East Falls Church is in Arlington County and West Falls Church is in Fairfax County.

  • Metro's Silver Line, completed July 2014, serves the East Falls Church station. It runs between Largo Town Center in the east, following the Blue Line route to Stadium-Armory, the Orange and Blue Lines to Rosslyn, and finally the Orange route alone until it reaches East Falls Church, where it branches off towards the northwest, currently terminating at the Wiehle-Reston East station. The next phase of the Silver Line will eventually reach eastern Loudoun County, including a station at Dulles International Airport. East Falls Church is the westernmost designated transfer station.
  • The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority provides bus service throughout the Washington metropolitan area, including Falls Church.
  • A small portion of the 45-mile (72 km) Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Trail (W&OD Trail) runs through the City (see: Washington & Old Dominion Railroad Regional Park). The trail enters the City from the west between mile markers 7 and 7.5 (near Broad Street). The trail enters the city from the east between mile markers 5.5 and 6. The W&OD Trail travels on the rail bed of the Washington and Old Dominion Railroad and various predecessor lines, which provided passenger service from 1860 to May 31, 1951, with exception of a few years during the U.S. Civil War. Freight service was abandoned when the railroad closed in August 1968. The Four Mile Run Trail, which ends at an intersection with the Mount Vernon Trail near Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport, begins in the city at Van Buren Street. These trails comprise a major bicycle commuting route to Washington, D.C.

Major highways[edit]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Media related to Category:Falls Church, Virginia at Wikimedia Commons

  1. ^ a b U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Falls Church
  2. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Falls Church city, Virginia". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved October 20, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Archived from the original on June 2, 2016. Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  4. ^ "Table 1: 2011 Poverty and Median Income Estimates – Counties". Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau. 2011. 
  5. ^ "Municipal Code of the City of Falls Church: Incorporation and Boundaries". Library1.municode.com:80. Archived from the original on January 21, 2012. Retrieved May 14, 2012. 
  6. ^ Gernard and Netherton, Falls Church: A Virginia Village Revisited, p.65.
  7. ^ "About Falls Church". Fallschurchva.gov. Retrieved May 14, 2012. 
  8. ^ Bradley E. Gernand and Nan Netherton, Falls Church—A Virginia Village Revisited. Virginia Beach: The Donning Company, 2000. Page 13, citing interviews with Fairfax County archeologists Michael Johnson and Martha Williams.
  9. ^ Gernand and Netherton, Falls Church, p. 13, citing Fairfax Harrison, The Landmarks of Old Prince William, pp. 143, 148.
  10. ^ Gernand and Netherton, Falls Church, p. 13, citing Melvin Steadman, Falls Church By Fence and Fireside, pp. iii, x.
  11. ^ Gernand and Netherton, Falls Church, p. 27, citing Emily Salmon and Edward Campell, Hornbook of Virginia History, pp. 27–29; Nan Netherton, Fairfax County, pp. 102–103; Tony Wrenn, Falls Church—History of a Village, p. 6.
  12. ^ Gernand and Netherton, Falls Church, p. 28, citing Beekman, Bridges and the City of Washington, pp. v, 1, 3.
  13. ^ Gernand, A Virginia Village Goes to War, pp. 22–29, quoting Southern Claims Commission case files and Evening Star newspaper articles.
  14. ^ Gernand, pp. 56–62, quoting Evening Star, New York Times and Hartford Courant newspaper articles and regimental histories.
  15. ^ Gernand, A Virginia Village Goes to War, pp. 98-100, quoting newspaper articles published in the New York Times, Evening Star, Elmira Weekly Advertiser, Buffalo Daily Courier, several regimental histories, and soldiers' letters home.
  16. ^ Gernand, A Virginia Village Goes to War, pp. 191–195, 200–201, 203–211, quoting Southern Claims Commission case files; books regarding Mosby’s Raiders; and a local history of Falls Church which cites family members’ statements.
  17. ^ "About Cherry Hill". Friends of Cherry Hill Foundation, Inc. Retrieved July 12, 2012. 
  18. ^ West cornerstone:
    Steadman, Jr., Melvin Lee (1964). Falls Church: By Fence and Fireside. Falls Church Public Library. :3
    "Boundary Stones of the District of Columbia". Boundary Stones of the District of Columbia. Archived from the original on December 27, 2014. Retrieved February 19, 2010. 
    "Andrew Ellicott Park at the West Cornerstone". Arlington County, Virginia. Archived from the original on October 18, 1996. Retrieved March 31, 2014. 
  19. ^ Stone SW9:
    "Boundary Stones of the District of Columbia". Boundary Stones of the District of Columbia. Archived from the original on December 27, 2014. Retrieved February 19, 2010. 
    "Isaac Crossman Park at Four Mile Run". Arlington County, Virginia. Arlington County, Virginia. Archived from the original on October 18, 1996. Retrieved March 31, 2014. 
  20. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011. 
  21. ^ "The Hills and Valleys of Falls Church". Fallschurchenvironment.org. Archived from the original on February 26, 2012. Retrieved May 14, 2012. 
  22. ^ "Monthly Average of Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature" (PDF). National Climatic Data Center. 
  23. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  24. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved January 2, 2014. 
  25. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 2, 2014. 
  26. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2014. 
  27. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 2, 2014. 
  28. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  29. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved May 14, 2011. 
  30. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved January 31, 2008. 
  31. ^ Vardi, Nathan "America's Richest Counties", Forbes, April 11, 2011, accessed June 6, 2011.
  32. ^ General Dynamics:
    "Contacts". General Dynamics. Retrieved August 30, 2012. 
    Northrop Grumman:
    "Locations". Northrop Grumman. Retrieved August 30, 2012. 
  33. ^ "2016 Annual Financial Report, City of Falls Church". 
  34. ^ "Article in Falls Church News-Press, May 2009". Fcnp.com. May 28, 2009. Archived from the original on February 23, 2012. Retrieved May 14, 2012. 
  35. ^ "Stephanie Willis, "Falls Church Farmer's Market," D.C. Foodies, Feb. 2, 2009". Dcfoodies.com. Retrieved May 14, 2012. 
  36. ^ "American Farmland Trust: Current Top 20 America's Favorite Farmers Markets". Action.farmland.org. Retrieved May 14, 2012. 
  37. ^ Mary Riley Styles Public Library – History
  38. ^ "The State Theatre – History". Thestatetheatre.com. November 27, 1988. Retrieved May 14, 2012. 
  39. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS
  40. ^ a b c d e f g "About the City Council". Fallschurchva.gov. July 14, 2008. Archived from the original on May 11, 2012. Retrieved May 14, 2012. 
  41. ^ "City Agrees to Sell Water System to Fairfax". Falls Church Times. 
  42. ^ Barton, Mary Ann. "It's Official: Fairfax Water Purchases Falls Church Water System for $40 Million" (Archive). Falls Church Patch. Retrieved on May 2, 2015. "This agreement also included a boundary adjustment that transferred 38.4 acres of land into the City of Falls Church. The largest parcel includes the 36 acres on which the City's George Mason High School and Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School sit."
  43. ^ Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology
  44. ^ "The Publisher: Q&A with Falls Church News-Press Owner-Editor Nicholas F. Benton," Out Front Blog, July 7, 2009 Archived February 1, 2015, at the Wayback Machine.
  45. ^ "Golnar Adili". Victori Contemporary. Retrieved April 10, 2016. 
  46. ^ Fenno, Nathan (2006-04-05). "Amaker 2006 profile: Who is Tommy Amaker?". Ann Arbor News.  reprinted at McVety, Dave (2007-03-17). "Amaker 2006 profile: Who is Tommy Amaker?". Mlive.com. Retrieved 2010-04-02. 
  47. ^ Provence, Lisa (March 14, 2012). "Happily-divorced relationship cartoonist tells all". The Hook. Retrieved 2016-05-16. 
  48. ^ "Molly Henneberg". ArticleBio. Retrieved 2017-10-05. 
  49. ^ "Louisa Krause credits". Broadway.com. Retrieved June 9, 2016. 
  50. ^ "McHUGH, Matthew Francis, (1938 - )". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved August 29, 2017. 
  51. ^ Barakat, Matthew (June 5, 2013). "Arab-American scholar Alixa Naff dies at 93". Seattle Times. Associated Press. Archived from the original on July 18, 2014. Retrieved June 30, 2013. 
  52. ^ Alexander Wetmore (1943). "In Memoriam: Joseph Harvey Riley". Auk. 60 (1): 1–15. doi:10.2307/4079305. 
  53. ^ Esposito, Greg (November 10, 2006). "Google CEO gives Va. Tech $2 million". Roanoke.com. Archived from the original on May 26, 2012. Retrieved January 13, 2013. 
  54. ^ "Death Notice: FREDERICK L. TALBOT", The Washington Post, January 16, 2013