Falls Incline Railway

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Falls Incline Railway
Falls Incline Railway, July 2015.jpg
Overview
Locale Niagara Falls, Ontario
Canada
Transit type Funicular
Website www.niagaraparks.com/attractions/falls-incline-railway.html
Operation
Began operation October 8, 1966 (1966-10-08)
Operator(s) Niagara Parks Commission
Technical
System length 59.8 m (196.2 ft)
Track gauge 1,850 mm (6 ft 2732 in)
Average speed 3.5 km/h (2.2 mph)

The Falls Incline Railway, originally known as the Horseshoe Falls Incline is a funicular railway in the city of Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada. It is located beside Niagara Falls at the Horseshoe Falls. The line was built in 1966 for the Niagara Parks Commission by the Swiss company Von Roll. It adopted its current name in the 1980s.[1][2] Originally built with open-air cars, it was rebuilt in 2013 with enclosed cars to permit year-round operation.[3]

Unlike the other incline railways at Niagara Falls, the Falls Incline was not built to descend into the Niagara Gorge below the falls. Instead it links the Table Rock Centre and Journey Behind the Falls, on the Niagara Parkway just above the falls to the higher level Fallsview Tourist Area, including the Minolta Tower, the Niagara Fallsview Casino Resort and several hotels.[2]

The Falls Incline Railway in 2010, before being rebuilt

The Niagara Parks Commission claims that the funicular is the world's slowest.

The funicular has the following technical parameters:[2]

  • Length: 59.8 metres (196 ft)[4]
  • Slope: 30 degrees
  • Cars: 2
  • Capacity: 40 passengers per car
  • Configuration: Double track
  • Maximum speed: 1 metre per second (197 ft/min)
  • Journey time: 62 seconds[5]
  • Track gauge: 1,850 mm (6 ft 2732 in)
  • Traction: Electricity

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Transit History of Niagara Falls, Ontario". David A. Wyatt. Retrieved March 24, 2007. 
  2. ^ a b c "Falls Incline History". Niagara Parks Commission. Archived from the original on March 4, 2007. Retrieved March 24, 2007. 
  3. ^ Langley, Alison (2014-01-22). "Falls Incline Railway closed until spring". Niagara Falls Review. Retrieved 2015-05-31. 
  4. ^ "Niagara Falls Incline Railway". Ontario.ca. Queen's Printer for Ontario. Retrieved 2015-05-31. 
  5. ^ "Sneak peak of new Incline Railway". Welland Tribune. 2013-08-08. Retrieved 2015-05-31. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°04′46″N 79°04′51″W / 43.079499°N 79.080789°W / 43.079499; -79.080789