Family tree of Genghis Khan

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The family tree of Genghis Khan is listed below. This family tree only lists prominent members of the Borjigin family and does not reach the present. Genghis Khan appears in the middle of the tree, and Kublai Khan appears at the bottom of the tree. The Borjigin family was the royal family of the Mongol Empire, dating back to the 13th and 14th centuries.

Diagrammatic family tree[edit]

Only selected, prominent members are shown. Khagans (Great Khans) are in bold.


Hoelun
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Yesugei
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Börte
 
Temüjin
(Genghis Khan)
 
Hasar
 
Hachiun
 
Temüge
 
Belgutei
 
Behter
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jochi
 
 
 
 
 
Chagatai
 
Töregene
Khatun
 
Ögedei
 
Sorghaghtani
Beki
 
Tolui
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Batu
 
Berke
 
Baidar
 
Güyük
 
Kashin
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sartaq
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Kaidu
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Möngke
 
Kublai
 
Hulagu
 
Ariq Böke
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Zhenjin
 
Abaqa Khan
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Temür
 
Arghun

Wada Sei did pioneer work on this field, and Honda Minobu and Okada Hidehiro modified it, utilizing newly discovered Persian (Timurid) records and Mongol chronicles. Yuan genealogy.png

Detailed family tree[edit]

This section is divided in a series of sub-sections for better understanding. The first part traces Genghis Khan's lineage back to the dawn of the Mongolian people, while the second part accounts for his notable descendants (ones that assumed leading roles within the Mongol Empire or later states). The first part is based on the written accounts of The Secret History of the Mongols, a literary work embedded with historical value. The second part is based on the work of several different scholars and historians (especially Rashid al-Din Hamadani), which are, in most cases, incomplete and even conflicting. The index preceding the individual's name represents the number of generations since a common ancestor (in the first part: Borte Chino; in the second part: Genghis Khan).

Genghis Khan's ancestors[edit]

Borte Chino (Grey Wolf) and his wife was Gua Maral (White Doe)

---

  • 12. Bukhu Khatagi - was the first son of Alan Gua, conceived after the death of Dobun Mergen
  • 12. Bukhatu Salji - was the second son of Alan Gua, conceived after the death of Dobun Mergen
  • 12. Bodonchar Munkhag - was the third son of Alan Gua, conceived after the death of Dobun Mergen
    • 13. Habich Baghatur - was the son of Bodonchar Munkhag
      • 14. Menen Tudun - was the son of Habich Baghatur
        • 15. Hachi Hulug - was the son of Menen Tudun
          • 16. Khaidu - was the son of Hachi Hulug
            • 17. Baishinkhor Dogshin - was the first son of Khaidu
              • 18. Tumbinai Setsen - was the son of Baishinkhor Dogshin
                • 19. Khabul Khan - was the first son of Tumbinai Setsen, and Khan of the Khamag Mongol (1120–1149)
                  • 20. Ohinbarhag - was the first son of Khabul Khan
                  • 20. Bartan Baghatur - was the second son of Khabul Khan
                    • 21. Mengitu Hiyan - was the first son of Bartan Baghatur
                    • 21. Negun Taiji - was the second son of Bartan Baghatur
                    • 21. Yesugei - was the third son of Bartan Baghatur, and his wife was Hoelun
                      • 22. Temujin (Genghis Khan) - was the first son of Yesugei and Hoelun, and Khan of the Khamag Mongol (1189–1206)
                      • 22. Hasar - was the second son of Yesugei and Hoelun
                      • 22. Hachiun - was the third son of Yesugei and Hoelun
                      • 22. Temuge - was the fourth son of Yesugei and Hoelun
                      • 22. Behter - was the first son of Yesugei and his lesser wife Sochigel
                      • 22. Belgutei - was the second son of Yesugei and his lesser wife Sochigel
                    • 21. Daridai - was the fourth son of Bartan Baghatur
                  • 20. Hutugtu Monhor - was the third son of Khabul Khan
                  • 20. Hotula Khan - was the fourth son of Khabul Khan, and Khan of the Khamag Mongol (1156–1160)
                  • 20. Hulan - was the fifth son of Khabul Khan
                  • 20. Hadan - was the sixth son of Khabul Khan
                  • 20. Todoi - was the seventh son of Khabul Khan
                • 19. Semsochule - was the second son of Tumbinai Setsen
                  • 20. Ardi Barlas - was the first son of Semsochule
                  • 20. Ang Goran - was the second son of Semsochule
            • 17. Chirhya Lynhua - was the second son of Khaidu
              • 18. Sengun Bilge - was the son of Chirhya Lynhua
                • 19. Ambaghai Khan - was the son of Sengun Bilge, and Khan of the Khamag Mongol (1149–1156)
            • 17. Chaujin Ortagai - was the third son of Khaidu

Genghis Khan's descendants[edit]

Temujin (Genghis Khan) - Founder and Khagan of the Mongol Empire (1206–1227)

  • 01. Jochi[1] - Ruler of the Ulus of Jochi (later known as Golden Horde or Kipchak Khanate)
    • 02. Orda - Founder and Khan of the White Horde (1226–1251)
      • 03. Sartaqtai
        • 04. Qonichi - Khan of the White Horde (1280–1302)
          • 05. Bayan - Khan of the White Horde (1302–1309)
            • 06. Sasi-Buqa - Khan of the White Horde (1309–1320)
              • 07. Erzen[2] - Khan of the White Horde (1320–1345)
                • 08. Chimtai - Khan of the White Horde (1345–1361)
      • 03. Qonqiran - Khan of the White Horde (1251–1280)
    • 02. Batu - Founder and Khan of the Blue Horde (1227–1255) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1227–1255)
      • 03. Sartaq - Khan of the Blue Horde (1255–1256) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1255–1256)
        • 04. Ulaghchi - Khan of the Blue Horde (1256–1257) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1256–1257)
      • 03. Toqoqan
        • 04. Tartu
          • 05. Tole-Buqa - Khan of the Blue Horde (1287–1291) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1287–1291)
        • 04. Mongke-Temur - Khan of the Blue Horde (1267–1280) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1267–1280)
          • 05. Toqta - Khan of the Blue Horde (1291–1313) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1291–1313)
          • 05. Toghrilcha
            • 06. Oz-Beg - Khan of the Blue Horde (1313–1341) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1313–1341)
              • 07. Tini-Beg - Khan of the Blue Horde (1341–1342) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1341–1342)
              • 07. Jani-Beg - Khan of the Blue Horde (1342–1357) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1342–1357)
                • 08. Berdi-Beg - Khan of the Blue Horde (1357–1359) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1357–1359)
                • 08. Qulpa - Khan of the Blue Horde (1359–1360) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1359–1360)
                • 08. Nawruz-Beg - Khan of the Blue Horde (1360–1361) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1360–1361)
        • 04. Tode-Mongke - Khan of the Blue Horde (1280–1287) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1280–1287)
    • 02. Berke - Khan of the Blue Horde (1257–1267) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1257–1267)
    • 02. Shiban
      • 03. Qadaq
        • 04. Tole-Buqa
          • 05. Mingqutai
            • 06. Khidr[3] - Khan of the Blue Horde (1361–1361) and ruling Khan of the Golden Horde (1361–1361)
    • 02. Teval
      • 03. Tatar
        • 04. Nogai
          • 05. Chaka - Emperor of Bulgaria (1299–1300)
    • 02. Toqa-Temur
      • 03. Bai-Temur
      • 03. Knots-Temur
        • 04. Khwaja
          • 05. Badik
            • 06. Urus[5] - Khan of the White Horde (1368–1376) and Khan of the Blue Horde (1372–1374)
              • 07. Toqtaqiya - Khan of the White Horde (1376–1377)
              • 07. Temur-Malik - Khan of the White Horde (1377–1378)
                • 08. Temur-Qutlugh - Khan of the Golden Horde (1395–1399)
                  • 09. Temur - Khan of the Golden Horde (1410–1411)
                    • 10. Kuchuk Muhammad - Khan of the Golden Horde (1435–1459)
                      • 11. Mahmud Astrakhani - Khan of the Golden Horde (1459–1465) and Khan of Astrakhan (1465–1466)
                      • 11. Ahmad - Khan of the Great Horde (1465–1481)
                        • 12. Murtaza - Khan of the Great Horde (1493–1494)
                          • 13. Aq Kubek
                            • 14. Abdullah
                              • 15. Mustafa Ali - Khan of Qasim (1584–1590)
                        • 12. Syed Ahmad
                          • 13. Qasim II Astrakhani
                            • 14. Yadigar Muhammad - Khan of Kazan (1552–1552)
                        • 12. Sheikh Ahmad - Khan of the Great Horde (1481–1493, 1494–1502)
                        • 12. ???
                          • 13. Beg-Bulat
                            • 14. Sain-Bulat - Khan of Qasim (1567–1973)
                      • 11. Bakhtiyar
                        • 12. Sheikh Allahyar - Khan of Qasim (1512–1516)
                          • 13. Shah Ali - Khan of Qasim (1516–1519, 1535–1551, 1552–1567) and Khan of Kazan (1519–1521, 1551–1552)
                          • 13. Jan Ali - Khan of Qasim (1519–1532) and Khan of Kazan (1532–1535)
                • 08. Shadi-Beg - Khan of the Golden Horde (1399–1407)
                • 08. Pulad - Khan of the Golden Horde (1407–1410)
              • 07. Koirichak
                • 08. Baraq - Khan of the Golden Horde (1422–1427)
            • 06. Tuli-Khwaja
              • 07. Toqtamish[6] - Khan of the White Horde (1378–1380) and Khan of the Golden Horde (1380–1395)
                • 08. Jalal al-Din - Khan of the Golden Horde (1411–1412)
                  • 09. Ulugh Muhammad - Khan of the Golden Horde (1419–1420, 1427–1435) and Khan of Kazan (1437–1445)
                    • 10. Mahmud - Khan of Kazan (1445–1462)
                      • 11. Khalil - Khan of Kazan (1462–1467)
                      • 11. Ibrahim - Khan of Kazan (1467–1479)
                        • 12. Ali - Khan of Kazan (1479–1484, 1485–1487)
                        • 12. Muhammad Amin - Khan of Kazan (1484–1485, 1487–1495, 1502–1519)
                        • 12. Abdul Latif - Khan of Kazan (1496–1502)
                    • 10. Qasim - Khan of Qasim (1452–1468)
                      • 11. Daniyal - Khan of Qasim (1468–1486)
                • 08. Karim-Berdi - Khan of the Golden Horde (1412–1414)
                • 08. Kebek - Khan of the Golden Horde (1414–1417)
                • 08. Jabbar-Berdi - Khan of the Golden Horde (1417–1419)
                  • 09. Dawlat-Berdi - Khan of the Golden Horde (1420–1422)
  • Chagatai, founder of the Chagatai Khanate in present-day Iran, reputed ancestor of Babur of the Mughal Empire in India.

See also[edit]

Primary sources[edit]

B. Sumiyabaatar, "The Genealogy of the Mongols", 720 P, 2003, ISBN 99929-5-552-X
  • Secret History of Mongols: A Mongolian Epic Chronicle of the Thirteenth Century [Yuan chao bi shi]. Brill's Inner Asian Library vol. 7. tr. Igor de Rachewiltz. Leiden; Boston: Brill. 2004. ISBN 90-04-13159-0. 
  • Abulgazi, Shejere-i Tarakime (Genealogical Tree of the Turks, 1659 // Simurg, 1996, ISBN 975-7172-09-X, ISBN 978-975-7172-09-3; Abulgazi, "Shejerei Terakime", Ashgabat, 1992; Abulgaziy, "Shajarai Türk", Tashkent, 1992)
  • B. Sumiyabaatar, "The Genealogy of the Mongols", 720 P, 2003, ISBN 99929-5-552-X]; The genealogy of the families mentioned in this book generally goes back to 18 generations. The genealogy of Chingis Khan which began 1.500 years or 40-50 generations ago and comprises hundreds of thousands of people prevented Mongolian blood from being mixed with that of other nations. Due to the encouragement of intra-tribal marriages family lines were kept stringent. From 1920 onward people were not allowed to keep genealogical records, and the descendants of the nobles and scholars were tortured and killed. This prohibition lasted for about 70 years or three generations. Although the keeping of genealogical records was rare during that period, Mongolians used to pass information about their ancestors to their children orally.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Jochi's paternity is uncertain. It was a matter of debate during his lifetime as it is now. His mother, Borte Fujin, gave him birth within her 9-month period of captivity among the Merkit people. Despite of that, Genghis Khan always addressed Jochi as his own offspring.
  2. ^ The ruling years of Sasi-Buqa, Erzen and Chimtai may have been as follows: Sasi-Buqa (1309–1315), Erzen (1315–1320), Chimtai (1344–1361), with the gap (1320–1344) being filled by the ruling years of Mubarak-Khwaja, who has been pointed as Chimtai's uncle, father or brother by some historians. However, recent findings indicate that Mubarak-Khwaja is actually not from Ordaid descent, but from Toqa-Timurid instead, which gives us the dates and the family tree structure observed in the main article.
  3. ^ Following the deaths of Jani-Beg's sons, the Batuid lineage came to an end as rulers of the Blue Horde/Golden Horde. A period of anarchy (known as bulqaq in Turkic) took place in the Blue Horde and lasted until the establishment of Toqtamish’s rule in 1380. According to Ötemiš-Hājji (Čingiz-Nāma 50b: Judin 1992, p. 136), Khidr was the first to claim Saray's empty throne with the support of Taidula (Jani-Beg's mother). His Shibanid lineage was also acknowledged by Spuler (1965, p. 111: “einem Ururenkel Šybans”).
  4. ^ Following the death of Chimtai, the Ordaid lineage came to an end as rulers of the White Horde. According to Ötemiš-Hājji (Čingiz-Nāma 53a: Judin 1992, p. 139), Qara-Nogai was the first to claim Signaq's empty throne with the support of his brothers (that later followed him). Qara-Nogai's (as Urus' and Mubarak Khwaja's) Toqa-Temurid lineage was also acknowledged by István Vásáry (2009, p. 383: “The Beginnings of Coinage in the Blue Horde”).
  5. ^ The position of Urus and his brother Tuli-Khwaja in Jochi's family tree is controversial. Scholars and historians had previously traced them to Orda's lineage (as sons of Chimtai), but nowadays most of the academics seem to agree that they were Toqa-Temur's descendants (sons of Badik). One of the strongest arguments in favour of this change is presented by István Vásáry (2009, p. 383: “The Beginnings of Coinage in the Blue Horde”).
  6. ^ Toqtamish seized the throne of the Blue Horde in 1380, ending the bulqaq (anarchy period) and establishing the reunification of both east and west wings of the Golden Horde. Urus had achieved something similar in 1372, but that lasted only for a short period. Furthermore, despite being Khan of the Golden Horde de facto, Urus' position was contested among the Blue Horde by that time, and he never truly promoted the reunification of both wings.