Family tree of Uthman

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Uthman ibn Affan (Arabic: عثمان بن عفان) (c. 583 – June 17, 656) was the third Caliph of the Ummah, and is regarded by the ShiaMuslims as one of the Four Righteously Guided Caliphs. He reigned from 644 until 656. He was the companion of Islamic prophet Muhammad as well as son-in-law of Muhammad. His two daughters were married to Uthman one after another therefore Uthman earned a honorific title "DhulNoorayn".

Family tree[edit]

Qusai ibn Kilab
Abd Manaf ibn QusaiAtikah bint Murrah
Hashim ibn 'Abd ManafAbd Shams ibn Abd Manaf
Abdul-Muttalib ibn HashimHabib ibn Abd Shams[1]Umayya ibn Abd Shams
Rabi'ah ibn Habib
Umm Hakim bint Abdul MuttalibKurayz ibn Rabi'ahAbu al-'As ibn UmayyahAbu ‘Amr ibn Umayya
Abdullah ibn Abdul-Muttalib
Arwa bint KurayzAffan ibn Abi al-'AsAbu Mu‘ayṭ ibn Abu ‘Amr
Muhammad Ibn AbdullahMuhammad2.png
Uqba ibn Abu Mu'ayt
Ruqayyah bint MuhammadUthman ibn al-Affan Rashidun Caliph Uthman ibn Affan - عثمان بن عفان ثالث الخلفاء الراشدين.svg
Umm Kulthum bint MuhammadWaleed ibn Uqba[2]'Ammara ibn UqbaUmm Kulthum bint Uqba[2]

Children and Descendants[edit]

Wives Children Notes
"Umm ‘Amr" ‘Amr ibn Uthman Uthman was known as "Abu ‘Amr" before Islam.[3]:38 It is therefore inferred that he had a son named ‘Amr who died in infancy. However, nothing is known about this child or his mother.
Asma bint Abi Jahl (from the Banu Makhzum) Mughira ibn Uthman This wife and child are only mentioned in one source, so the report may be apocryphal.
Asma later married her cousin al-Walid ibn Abdshams.[4]:109
Ruqayyah bint Muhammad Abdullah ibn Uthman Ruqayyah was first married to Utbah ibn Abu Lahab, her cousin, but he divorced her at Abu Lahab's request.
Umm Kulthum bint Muhammad Umm Kulthum was previously married to Utaybah ibn Abu Lahab, but he divorced her.
Zaynab bint Hayyan (from the Hawazin tribe) Zaynab was captured at the Battle of Hunayn and was briefly Uthman's concubine; but he soon released her back to her family.[5]:462
Fakhitah bint Ghazwan (sister of Utbah ibn Ghazwan) (from the Qays-Aylan tribe) Abdullah the Younger
Umm al-Banin bint Uyaynah ibn Hisn (from Fazara clan of the Ghatafan tribe) Utbah ibn Uthman
Abdul Malik ibn Uthman
Both children died young.
A daughter of Khalid ibn Asid (from the Banu Umayya) Uthman married her c.631 and she died childless c.634.[4]:116
Fatima bint Al-Walid (from the Banu Makhzum) Walid ibn Uthman
Said ibn Uthman
Umm Said bint Uthman
Umm Uthman bint Uthman
Uthman divorced Fatima, who then married a Makhzum cousin, Abdulrahman ibn Abdullah.[4]:110-111
Umm ‘Amr Umm Najm bint Jandab al-Azdi ‘Amr ibn Uthman
Khalid ibn Uthman
Aban ibn Uthman[6]
Umar ibn Uthman
Maryam bint Uthman
‘Amr was the eldest son of Uthman to survive infancy.
This 'Amr, who was born c.635, should not be confused with Uthman's previous son, also named 'Amr, who was born before 610.[4]:116
Ramlah bint Shaybah (daughter of Shaybah ibn Rabi'ah of the Banu Abd Shams) Aisha bint Uthman
Umm Aban bint Uthman
Umm Amr bint Uthman
Aisha bint Uthman was married to Marwan I ibn al-Hakam who was her first cousin once removed. They had a daughter who later married Musa ibn Nusayr.
Bunana This marriage apparently ended in divorce.[3]:43
Naila bint al-Farafsa `Anbasah ibn Uthman
Maryam bint Uthman
Umm Banin bint Uthman
Uthman married Naila in 649.[4]:131


An unnamed Concubine Umm al-Banin bint Uthman Umm al-Banin married Abdullah ibn Yazid ibn Abi Sufyan.[3]:39

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ al-Maqdisi, Abd al-Ghani (2004). Short Biography of the Prophet & His Ten Companions. Darussalam. p. 73.
  2. ^ a b Ashgar Razwy, Sayyid Ali. A Restatement of the History of Islam and Muslims.
  3. ^ a b c Muhammad ibn Saad. Kitab al-Tabaqat al-Kabir Volume 3. Translated by Bewley, A. (2013). The Companions of Badr. London: Ta-Ha Publishers.
  4. ^ a b c d e Ahmed, A. Q. (2011). The Religious Elite of the Early Islamic Hijaz: Five Prosopographical Case Studies. Oxford: Unit for Prosopographical Research.
  5. ^ Muhammad ibn Umar al-Waqidi. Kitab al-Maghazi. Translated by Faizer, R., Ismail, A., & Tayob, A. K. (2011). The Life of Muhammad. London & New York: Routledge.
  6. ^ "Aban Bin Usman".