Fantastic Damage

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Fantastic Damage
ElPFanDam.jpg
Studio album by El-P
Released May 14, 2002 (2002-05-14)[1]
Genre Hip hop
Length 70:18
Label Definitive Jux
Producer El-P
El-P chronology
El-P Presents Cannibal Oxtrumentals
(2002)
Fantastic Damage
(2002)
High Water
(2004)
Singles from Fantastic Damage
  1. "Stepfather Factory"
    Released: 2001
  2. "Deep Space 9mm"
    Released: 2002
  3. "Truancy"
    Released: 2002
  4. "Dead Disnee"
    Released: 2002

Fantastic Damage is the first solo studio album by American hip hop artist El-P. It was released through Definitive Jux on May 14, 2002. It peaked at number 198 on the Billboard 200 chart.[2] Music videos were created for "Stepfather Factory"[3] and "Deep Space 9mm".[4]

Fandam Plus: Instrumentals, Remixes, Lyrics & Video was released through Definitive Jux on October 1, 2002.[5]

Production[edit]

The majority of the album was made after Company Flow's breakup.[6] It took over a year and a half recording the album.[6] Public Enemy was a big influence on El-P's production style on the album.[6] There are references to Philip K. Dick and George Orwell on the album; they influenced El-P's worldview and lyrics.[6]

Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic4.5/5 stars[7]
Entertainment WeeklyA[8]
NME8/10[9]
Pitchfork8.9/10[10]
Rolling Stone3.5/5 stars[11]
Spin9/10[12]
Stylus MagazineA[13]

Steve Huey of AllMusic gave the album 4.5 stars out of 5, saying, "Fantastic Damage constitutes some of the most challenging, lyrically dense hip-hop around, assembled by one of the genre's true independent mavericks."[7] Kathryn McGuire of Rolling Stone gave the album 3.5 stars out of 5, calling it "a heavy, turbulent affair."[11]

Pitchfork placed it at number 11 on the "Top 50 Albums of 2002" list,[14] while Spin included it on the "40 Best Albums of 2002" list.[15] In 2015, Fact placed it at number 21 on the "100 Best Indie Hip-Hop Records of All Time" list.[16]

Track listing[edit]

No.TitleLength
1."Fantastic Damage"3:22
2."Squeegee Man Shooting"4:24
3."Deep Space 9mm"3:47
4."Tuned Mass Damper"4:05
5."Dead Disnee"3:53
6."Delorean"5:33
7."Truancy"5:04
8."The Nang, the Front, the Bush and the Shit"5:37
9."Accidents Don't Happen"4:50
10."Stepfather Factory"4:11
11."T.O.J."4:32
12."Dr. Hellno and the Praying Mantus"4:39
13."Lazerfaces' Warning"4:36
14."Innocent Leader"2:21
15."Constellation Funk"4:58
16."Blood"4:26

Personnel[edit]

Credits adapted from liner notes.

  • El-P – vocals, production, recording, mixing, art direction
  • Aesop Rock – vocals (6)
  • Ill Bill – vocals (6)
  • Rob Sonic – vocals (7)
  • Vast Aire – vocals (8, 12)
  • Cage – vocals (9)
  • Camu Tao – vocals (9)
  • Nasa – vocals (15), recording, mixing
  • C-Rayz Walz – vocals (16)
  • Mr. Lif – vocals (16)
  • DJ Abilities – turntables
  • Dan Ezra Lang – art direction, design, painting
  • Alexander Calder – painting
  • Phase Two – painting

Charts[edit]

Chart (2002) Peak
position
US Billboard 200[2] 198
US Heatseekers Albums (Billboard)[17] 9
US Independent Albums (Billboard)[18] 14
US Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums (Billboard)[19] 82

References[edit]

  1. ^ Purdom, Clayton (May 14, 2017). "El-P's Fantastic Damage turns 15 today—too bad you can't find it anywhere". The A.V. Club. Retrieved September 6, 2018. 
  2. ^ a b "El-P: Chart History (Billboard 200)". Billboard. Retrieved September 5, 2018. 
  3. ^ Thill, Scott (April 10, 2007). "El-P Wakes the Dead". Wired. Retrieved September 6, 2018. 
  4. ^ Thill, Scott (September 10, 2008). "9/11 Rewind: El-P's "Deep Space 9mm"". Wired. Retrieved September 6, 2018. 
  5. ^ Heaton, Dave (February 4, 2003). "EL-P: Fandam Plus: Instrumentals, Remixes, Lyrics & Video". PopMatters. Retrieved September 5, 2018. 
  6. ^ a b c d Chennault, Sam (August 1, 2002). "El-P". Pitchfork. Retrieved September 6, 2018. 
  7. ^ a b Huey, Steve. "Fantastic Damage – El-P". AllMusic. Retrieved April 6, 2016. 
  8. ^ Hermes, Will (May 24, 2002). "Fantastic Damage". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved April 6, 2016. 
  9. ^ "El-P: Fantastic Damage". NME: 30. May 25, 2002. 
  10. ^ Chennault, Sam (June 18, 2002). "El-P: Fantastic Damage". Pitchfork. Retrieved April 6, 2016. 
  11. ^ a b McGuire, Kathryn (June 20, 2002). "El-P: Fantastic Damage". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on August 7, 2008. Retrieved April 6, 2016. 
  12. ^ Ryan, Chris (July 2002). "Under Dawgs". Spin. 18 (7): 111. Retrieved April 6, 2016. 
  13. ^ Mueller, Gavin (September 1, 2003). "El-P – Fantastic Damage – Review". Stylus Magazine. Archived from the original on January 8, 2005. Retrieved April 6, 2016. 
  14. ^ "Top 50 Albums of 2002 (page 4 of 5)". Pitchfork. January 1, 2003. Retrieved September 5, 2018. 
  15. ^ "The 40 Best Albums of 2002 (page 15 of 41)". Spin. December 31, 2002. Retrieved September 5, 2018. 
  16. ^ "The 100 best indie hip-hop records of all time (page 81 of 101)". Fact. February 25, 2015. Retrieved September 5, 2018. 
  17. ^ "El-P: Chart History (Heatseekers Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved September 5, 2018. 
  18. ^ "El-P: Chart History (Independent Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved September 5, 2018. 
  19. ^ "El-P: Chart History (Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved September 5, 2018. 

External links[edit]