Fara, Safad

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Fara
Fara is located in Mandatory Palestine
Fara
Fara
Arabic فارة
Name meaning Farah, The highest parts of a mountain[1]
Subdistrict Safad
Coordinates 33°03′57″N 35°27′29″E / 33.06583°N 35.45806°E / 33.06583; 35.45806Coordinates: 33°03′57″N 35°27′29″E / 33.06583°N 35.45806°E / 33.06583; 35.45806
Palestine grid 193/274
Population 320[2] (1945)
Area 7,229[3] dunams
Date of depopulation October 30, 1948[4]
Cause(s) of depopulation Military assault by Yishuv forces

Fara (Arabic: فارة) was a Palestinian Arab village in the Safad Subdistrict. It was depopulated during the 1948 Arab-Israeli War on October 30, 1948 under Operation Hiram. It was located 11.5 km north of Safad on the Wadi al-Fara.

History[edit]

According to he Palestine Exploration Fund's Survey of Western Palestine (SWP) this place seems to be the most probable site of Caphar Farara (or Farawa), where was the tomb of R. Nahum of Gimzo, as mentioned in the various Jewish itineraries from 1210 to 1664 C.E.[5]

Ottoman era[edit]

During the early Ottoman era in 1596, Fara was part of the nahiyah ("subdistrict") of Jira, part of the Liwa ("district") of Safad. It had a population of 40 households and 11 bachelors; an estimated 281 persons, all Muslim.[6][7] They paid a fixed tax rate of 25% on agricultural products, including wheat, barley, olive trees, vineyards, goats and beehives, in addition to occasional revenues and a press for olive oil or grape syrup; a total of 3,832 Akçe. Half of the revenues went to a waqf.[8]

In 1881 the SWP described Farah as having “Mud and basalt houses, containing about 100 Moslems. It is situated on a plain, cultivated as arable land. Water from Wady Far'ah and from cisterns and birket."[9] The villagers cultivated olive and fig trees and vineyards.[10]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine conducted by the British Mandate authorities, ‘’Fara‘’ had a population of 218, all Muslims except 1 Christian,[11] increasing slightly in the 1931 census to 229, all Muslims, in a total of 42 houses.[12]

In 1944/5 it had a population of 320 Muslims,[2] with a total of 7,229 dunums of land.[3] Of this, 3,738 were used for cereal, 173 were irrigated or used for orchards,[13] while 38 dunams were classified as built-up, (urban), land.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palmer, 1881, p. 72
  2. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 9
  3. ^ a b Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 69
  4. ^ Morris, 2004, p. xvi, village #35. Also gives cause of depopulation.
  5. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 206
  6. ^ Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 178, as given by Khalidi, 1992, p.
  7. ^ Note that Rhode, 1979, p. 6 writes that the register that Hütteroth and Abdulfattah studied was not from 1595/6, but from 1548/9
  8. ^ Hütteroth and Abdulfattah, 1977, p. 178
  9. ^ Conder and Kitchener, 1881, SWP I, p. 197
  10. ^ Khalidi, 1992, p. 448
  11. ^ Barron, 1923, Table XI, Sub-district of Safad, p. 41
  12. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 106
  13. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 118
  14. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 169

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]