List of Farm to Market Roads in Texas (700–799)

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Texas Farm to Market Road and Ranch to Market Road markers
Highway names
Interstates: Interstate Highway X (IH-X, I-X)
US Routes: U.S. Highway X (US X)
State: State Highway X (SH X)
Loops: Loop X
Spurs: Spur X
Farm or Ranch
to Market Roads:
Farm to Market Road X (FM X)
Ranch-to-Market Road X (RM X)
Park Roads: Park Road X (PR X)
System links

Farm to Market Roads in Texas are owned and maintained by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT).

FM 700[edit]

Farm to Market Road 700
Location: Howard County
Length: 10.920 mi[1] (17.574 km)
Existed: November 8, 1946–present

Farm to Market Road 700 is located in Howard County. It runs from Business I-20 in Big Spring to US 87 north of Big Spring.

FM 700 was designated on November 8, 1946 from US 80 (now I-20 Bus.) west of Big Spring to the north boundary of the Air Force Training School Area. This was formerly War Highway 14 from 1942 to 1946. On October 16, 1951 the road was extended east 2.5 miles to US 87, replacing a section of PR 8. On August 1, 1957 the road was extended east and north 4.3 miles. On September 27, 1960 the road was extended north 3.9 miles to SH 350. On June 15, 1961 the northern terminus was relocated to FM 669 and SH 350, shortening the route by 1 mile. On October 28, 1988 a 2.2 mile section from SH 350 west to US 87 was added.

FM 701[edit]

Farm to Market Road 701
Location:

FM 702[edit]

Farm to Market Road 702
Location:

FM 703[edit]

Farm to Market Road 703
Location: West Texas
Existed: November 8, 1946[2]–December 18, 1990

Farm to Market Road 703 was a designation applied to a highway in West Texas. There is no highway currently using the FM 703 designation.

FM 703 was originally designated on November 8, 1946 from Kermit to the Andrews County line. On May 7, 1948 the road was extended northeast to the Dawson, Gaines, and Martin County lines. On January 27, 1949 the road was extended to Lamesa. On September 28, 1949 the road was extended to SH 349 at Patricia, completing its routing. FM 703 was cancelled on December 18, 1990 and transferred to State Highway 115.

FM 704[edit]

Farm to Market Road 704
Location:

FM 705[edit]

Farm to Market Road 705
Location:

FM 706[edit]

Farm to Market Road 706
Location:

FM 707[edit]

Farm to Market Road 707
Location: Jones and Taylor counties
Length: 34.502 mi[3] (55.526 km)
Existed: December 10, 1946[3]–present

Farm to Market Road 707 is located in Jones and Taylor counties. It runs from US 83 south of Anson to IH 20 in Tye. It runs to the west of Dyess Air Force Base.

FM 707 was designated on December 10, 1946 from the east boundary of Camp Barkley east to US 83. This was formerly War Highway 7. On July 11, 1951 the road was extended north 12.7 miles to a junction with FM 708, replacing it. Four months later the road was extended to FM 605. On February 20, 1952 the road was extended north to US 83, replacing FM 1227 and creating a concurrency with FM 605. On January 1, 1960 the road was extended east 2.4 miles to FM 1750. On March 15, 1974 a spur connection to US 83 and US 84 was added. On June 30, 1995 the section of FM 707 from IH 20 to UR 1750 and the spur connection were transferred to UR 707.

FM 708[edit]

Farm to Market Road 708
Location:

FM 708 (1946)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 708
Location: Taylor County
Existed: December 10, 1946–July 11, 1951

The original FM 708 was designated on December 10, 1946 from US 80 (now IH 20) at Tye to SH 158 at Caps. On July 14, 1949 the road was extended north to the Jones County line. FM 708 was cancelled on July 11, 1951 and combined with FM 707.

FM 709[edit]

Farm to Market Road 709
Location:

FM 710[edit]

Farm to Market Road 710
Location:

FM 711[edit]

Farm to Market Road 711
Location:

FM 711 (1946)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 711
Location: Falls County
Existed: December 10, 1946–December 10, 1946

The original FM 711 was designated on December 10, 1946 from SH 139 (now SH 7) at or near Chilton to Satin. FM 711 was cancelled once it was completed.

FM 712[edit]

Farm to Market Road 712
Location: Falls County
Length: 5.728 mi[4] (9.218 km)
Existed: December 19, 1959[4]–present

Farm to Market Road 712 (FM 712) is a state highway in the U.S. state of Texas that stays within Falls County. The highway begins at Farm to Market Road 2027 (FM 2027), crosses the Brazos River and ends at State Loop 23 (Loop 23) south of Marlin.

FM 712 begins at a four-way intersection with FM 2027 about 5.0 miles (8.0 km) northeast of Lott. The continuation of the road to the southwest, which ends in Lott, is called Falls Road. From its start point, FM 712 goes east-northeast a distance of 2.6 miles (4.2 km) to a bridge over the Brazos River.[5] There is a county park and historical marker on the east side of the bridge that commemorates Sarahville de Viesca, the short-lived capital of Robertson's Colony.[6] FM 712 intersects with County Road 301 0.4 miles (0.6 km) past the bridge where it changes direction to the northeast. The highway passes County Road 302 on the left and the William P. Hobby Unit, a state prison for women, on the right. Continuing northeast, FM 712 crosses a railroad and intersects with County Road 287. The highway passes County Road 285 and ends at Loop 23 about 0.9 miles (1.4 km) south of the Marlin city limit. The highway is two lanes wide for its entire length.[5]

The designation of FM 712 in its current location occurred on December 19, 1959. This route was formerly part of FM 147. The highway started at SH 6 south of Marlin and continued 2.9 miles (4.7 km) southwest to a road junction. On November 15, 1973, FM 712 was extended an additional 3.2 miles (5.1 km) to FM 2027 at Carter Munsch Church. On November 30, 1978 the highway's designation was altered to start at FM 2027, go northeast, and end at Loop 23 south of Marlin.[4]

FM 712 (1946)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 712
Location: Falls County
Existed: December 10, 1946–December 10, 1946

The first use of the FM 712 designation was on December 10, 1946 from FM 107 at or near Mooreville north 1.5 miles toward Cottonwood. This route was cancelled once it was completed.

FM 712 (1951-1958)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 712
Location: Hill County
Existed: May 23, 1951–November 26, 1958

The next use of the FM 712 designation was on May 23, 1951 from US 81 in Itasca northeast 5.2 miles. On December 17, 1951 the western terminus was moved to FM 66 though the highway had the same mileage. On December 17, 1952, the road was extended 4.1 miles to US 81. FM 712 was cancelled on November 26, 1958 and transferred to FM 67.

FM 713[edit]

Farm to Market Road 713
Location:

FM 714[edit]

Farm to Market Road 714
Location:

FM 715[edit]

Farm to Market Road 715
Location:

FM 716[edit]

Farm to Market Road 716
Location:

FM 717[edit]

Farm to Market Road 717
Location:

FM 718[edit]

Farm to Market Road 718
Location:

FM 719[edit]

Farm to Market Road 719
Location:

FM 719 (1947)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 719
Location: Jackson County
Existed: September 9, 1947–January 16, 1953

The original FM 719 was designated on September 9, 1947 from US 59, 2.5 miles east of Edna, north through Cordele. FM 719 was cancelled on January 16, 1953 and transferred to FM 530.

FM 720[edit]

Farm to Market Road 720
Location: Denton and Collin counties
Length: 9.625 mi[7] (15.490 km)
Existed: October 17, 1947–present

Farm to Market Road 720 (FM 720) is a farm to market road in Denton County, Texas.[8]

FM 720 is a suburban road that begins at US 380 just west of the Lincoln Park town limits.[9] It travels southward, through Oak Point, before turning to the southeast and entering Little Elm. It merges onto eastbound El Dorado Parkway, while the Parkway westbound connects with the Lewisville Lake Toll Bridge and the city of Lake Dallas. The route continues northeast and east, as the main thoroughfare through Little Elm. In eastern Little Elm, El Dorado Parkway branches off to the north, while FM 720 continues east to its terminus at FM 423.[8]

FM 720 was first designated in neighboring Collin County in 1947; it replaced an old alignment of SH 24 between SH 289 and US 75, connecting Frisco and McKinney. In 1955, the route was extended into Denton County, to the new alignment of SH 24 (which would become US 380 in 1977), replacing FM 388 from SH 24 to FM 423 and portions of FM 423 from Old SH 24 to FM 388. The route was truncated in 2001, when the portion from Frisco to US 75 was mostly removed from the state highway system (a segment in east Frisco between SH 289 and FM 2478 was retained on the system and redesignated as FM 3537). The additional redesignation of some mileage as FM 423 in 2002 brought the route of FM 720 to its current length.[8]

FM 721[edit]

Farm to Market Road 721
Location:

FM 722[edit]

Farm to Market Road 722
Location:

FM 723[edit]

Farm to Market Road 723
Location: Fort Bend County
Length: 9.581 mi[10] (15.419 km)
Existed: August 1, 1947 (1947-08-01)[10]–present

Farm to Market Road 723 (FM 723) is a state highway in the U.S. state of Texas that stays within Fort Bend County. The highway begins at U.S. Route 90 Alternate (US 90A) and State Highway 36 (SH 36) in Rosenberg, goes directly north and ends at FM 1093 south of Katy.

FM 723 starts at the intersection of US 90A (Avenue H) and SH 36 (First Street) in Rosenberg and heads north on First Street. After one block, FM 723 crosses over multiple railroad tracks via the John H. Arredondo Bridge. On the north side of the bridge, there is a traffic signal at Avenue D. The highway, which is also called Houston Street, goes past Brazos Park and crosses the Brazos River by a bridge 0.5 miles (0.8 km) north of its starting point. Leaving the river behind, FM 723 passes through a rural landscape with an occasional subdivision. At a distance 4.0 miles (6.4 km) from the start, there are three school buildings belonging to the Lamar Consolidated Independent School District on the east side of the highway. From south to north, these are Werthimer Middle School, Briscoe Junior High School and John and Randolph Foster High School. There is a state historical marker in front of the high school. After passing the schools, FM 723 intersects with FM 359 at a traffic light 4.9 miles (7.9 km) from its start. The highway crosses Jones Creek 0.4 miles (0.6 km) north of FM 359 and proceeds an additional 3.3 miles (5.3 km) to a traffic signal at Bellaire Boulevard and Fulshear-Gaston Road. After another 0.8 miles (1.3 km), FM 723 ends at a traffic light at FM 1093. The continuation of the road north into a suburban area is called Spring Green Boulevard.[11]

FM 723 was originally designated on August 1, 1947, to start from Rosenberg and run about 5.2 miles (8.4 km) north to FM 359. On June 1, 1965, the highway was extended about 4.8 miles (7.7 km) from FM 359 to FM 1093. The intersection with FM 1093 was 2.0 miles (3.2 km) east of FM 1463.[10]

FM 724[edit]

Farm to Market Road 724
Location:

FM 725[edit]

Farm to Market Road 725
Location: SeguinNew Braunfels
Length: 16.099 mi[12] (25.909 km)
Existed: 1947–

Farm to Market Road 725 (FM 725) is a 16.099 mi (25.909 km) farm-to-market road in Comal and Guadalupe counties, Texas.[12]

FM 725 begins at an intersection with FM 467 in south Seguin, near its junction with SH 123 Business.[12] The route travels west to an intersection with SH 46 before leaving Seguin and making a dogleg to the north-northwest. Just outside the Seguin city limits, FM 725 intersects US 90 and has a junction with IH 10 at its Exit #604. The route has a brief concurrency with FM 78 in McQueeney before resuming a northward direction and passing Lake McQueeney before entering New Braunfels.[13] In New Braunfels, FM 725 (known as Seguin Avenue) has a junction with IH 35 at its Exit #187. The FM 725 designation ends at an intersection with IH 35 Business/SH 46 Business, the former route of US 81 in New Braunfels.[12][14]

FM 725 was designated in Guadalupe County in 1947; its southern terminus was at FM 78 in McQueeney, and its northern terminus was at the Comal County line. The following year, the designation was extended into Comal County, to US 81 in New Braunfels. The southward extension from FM 78 to US 90 occurred in 1961. The route was lengthened to the south, to Leissner Road (the location of the current dogleg in the route west of Seguin), in 1971. The extension to FM 467 was made in 1973, bringing FM 725 to its current routing.[12]

The official designation indicates a break in FM 725 at FM 78; however, signage in the area indicates a concurrency.[12]

FM 726[edit]

Farm to Market Road 726
Location:

FM 727[edit]

Farm to Market Road 727
Location:

FM 728[edit]

Farm to Market Road 728
Location:

FM 729[edit]

Farm to Market Road 729
Location:

FM 730[edit]

Farm to Market Road 730
Location:
Length: 57.87 mi[15] (93.13 km)
Existed: 1947–present

Farm to Market Road 730 or FM 730 is a two-lane, state-maintained highway connecting various farming areas of Montague, Wise, Parker, and Tarrant Counties.

FM 730 was originally designated in 1947 from SH 199 at Azle to the Wise County Line. In 1951, FM 730 extended to SH 114 in Boyd. In 1952, FM 730 extended northward to SH 24(Now US 380), replacing 7 miles of FM 1882 which began at SH 24. In 1956, FM 730 extended north 7.4 miles. In 1967, FM 730 extended northeast 6.4 miles. In 1973, FM 730 extended northeast 3.5 miles to the Montague County Line. In 1983, FM 730 extended northeast to FM 455. In 1984, FM 730 extended southeast to US 80(now US 180), replacing FM 1707 on that route.

FM 730 terminates at FM 455 near Forestburg in Montague County at its northern end and at US 180 in Weatherford at its southern end.

FM 731[edit]

Farm to Market Road 731
Location:

FM 732[edit]

Farm to Market Road 732
Location:

FM 733[edit]

Farm to Market Road 733
Location:

FM 734[edit]

Farm to Market Road 734
Location:

FM 735[edit]

Farm to Market Road 735
Location:

FM 736[edit]

Farm to Market Road 736
Location: Orange County
Length: 0.298 mi[16] (0.48 km)
Existed: September 27, 1960 (1960-09-27)[16]–present

FM 736 (1947)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 736
Location: Jim Wells and Nueces counties
Existed: September 9, 1947–November 2, 1955

The original FM 736 was designated on September 9, 1947 from Alice east to the Nueces County line. On July 14, 1949 the road was extended east 1.9 miles. FM 736 was cancelled on November 2, 1955 and transferred to FM 665.

FM 737[edit]

Farm to Market Road 737
Location:

FM 737 (1947)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 737
Location: Jim Wells County
Existed: September 9, 1947–January 27, 1949

The original FM 737 was designated on September 9, 1947 from US 59 at Alfred west to US 281. The county was unable to secure the right of way for FM 737 and it was cancelled 18 months later.

FM 738[edit]

Farm to Market Road 738
Location:


FM 739[edit]

Farm to Market Road 739
Location:

FM 739 (1947)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 739
Location: Jim Wells County
Existed: September 9, 1947–January 14, 1952

The original FM 739 was designated on September 9, 1947 from US 59 at Sandia southeast to the Nueces County line. FM 739 was cancelled on January 14, 1952 and transferred to FM 70.

FM 740[edit]

Farm to Market Road 740
Location: Kaufman, Rockwall Counties
Length: 19.657 mi[17] (31.635 km)
Existed: 1947[17]–present

Farm to Market Road 740 (FM 740), is a FM highway in the U.S. state of Texas. The road runs through more rural land while in Kaufman County; in Rockwall County, the road serves many residents that live on the east shore of Lake Ray Hubbard.

The highway is notorious among locals for its many sharp turns and curves.


FM 740 starts at the Kaufman-Dallas county line between Seagoville and Forney. The road continues south as Malloy Bridge Road, which runs to I-45 in Wilmer. There is no signage marking the end of FM 740, much less a sign noting the county line. FM 740 runs northeast to I-20 in the easternmost part of Mesquite. FM 740 makes two right angle turns just north of I-20. The first is at FM 548, where northbound traffic must turn right to continue on FM 740 and southbound traffic must stop. The second is about a 1/4 mile northwest of FM 548 at County Road 202.

The highway enters Forney as South Bois d' Arc Street. Near the town square 740 runs a short distance with FM 688 (an old alignment of US 80) before turning north on Pinson Road. FM 740 intersects US 80 before turning left, running out of Forney.

Entering Rockwall County, the highway enters Heath. 740 turns right at FM 1140, where the latter runs closer to the shore of Lake Ray Hubbard. FM 740 enters Rockwall, intersecting I-30 before terminating at SH 205.

FM 740 was designated in 1947 from the Rockwall County Line across US 80 to the Dallas County Line. In 1949, FM 740 extended north to FM 550. In 1955, the section of FM 550 from FM 740 to US 67 was transferred to FM 740. In 1959, FM 740 replaced part of the old location of US 80, the rest on the east became a spur connection. The west section of old US 80 was removed from the system. In 1960, the section of FM 740 on old US 80 and FM 740 spur connection were redesignated as part of FM 688. In 1963, FM 740 extended north to SH 205. In 1986, FM 740 was shifted to the west. The old route was cancelled and removed from the state highway system; this would be transferred to FM 548 in 1998. In 1995, the section from FM 1140 to SH 205 became an urban road.

FM 740 in Heath is currently being widened from 2 lanes to 4 lanes. The 1.5-mile expansion is between FM 549 and FM 1140.[18] The project was approved in 2012 with a budget of $12 million.[19]

FM 741[edit]

Farm to Market Road 741
Location:

FM 742[edit]

Farm to Market Road 742
Location: Waco
Length: 0.175 mi[20] (0.282 km)
Existed: May 7, 1970 [20]

Farm to Market Road 742 (FM 742) is a Farm to Market Road located entirely in the city of Waco and is part of Chappel Hill Road through its length.

The highway begins at its southern terminus, Spur 484, in Waco, as a two-lane, paved, asphalt road. From there, FM 742 travels in a northeasterly direction on Chappel Hill Road, crossing over a railroad track[21] and continuing on with businesses on the northwest side and a field on the southeast. FM 742 reaches its northern terminus at Old Marlin Road after a distance of 0.175 miles (282 m).[22] Chappel Hill Road continues northeast for another 1.3 miles (2.1 km) without the FM 742 designation, passing several homes and fields before reaching its northern terminus at Loop 340.[21][23]

On May 7, 1970, FM 742 was designated on its current route in far eastern Waco.[20] As of 2012, FM 742 is the shortest route in Texas's Farm/Ranch to Market Road system, at just 0.175 miles (282 m).[24]

FM 742 (1947)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 742
Location: Karnes County
Existed: September 9, 1947–February 15, 1970

The original FM 742 was designated on September 9, 1947 from FM 81, 3 miles north of Runge to a dead end point just past a junction with Karnes County Road 317. FM 742 was cancelled on February 15, 1970 and combined with FM 627.

FM 743[edit]

Farm to Market Road 743
Location:

FM 744[edit]

Farm to Market Road 744
Location:

FM 744 (1947)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 744
Location: Karnes County
Existed: December 17, 1947–January 6, 1950

The original FM 744 was designated on December 17, 1947 from US 181 at Hobson south 5 miles. On March 31, 1948 the section from Hobson to SH 123 was added. FM 744 was cancelled on January 6, 1950 and combined with FM 81.

FM 745[edit]

Farm to Market Road 745
Location:

FM 745 (1947)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 745
Location: Bailey and Lamb counties
Existed: September 9, 1947–November 1, 1968

The original FM 745 was designated on September 9, 1947 from SH 214, 9 miles south of Muleshoe, east to the Lamb County line. On December 17, 1952 the road was extended east 2.6 miles to US 84. FM 745 was cancelled on November 1, 1968 and combined with FM 746.

FM 746[edit]

Farm to Market Road 746
Location:

FM 747[edit]

Farm to Market Road 747
Location: Cherokee County
Length: 21.03 mi[25] (33.84 km)
Existed: 1947[25]–present

Farm to Market Road 747, or FM 747, in eastern Texas (USA), runs about 21.03 miles (33.84 km) from an intersection with US 84 west of Maydelle, north to a multiplex west of Jacksonville, then west (but still signed north) to a county road east of the border of Cherokee and Anderson counties.

FM 747 has no local street names. Mostly rural, the landscape along the road is mainly hilly with trees and farms. The west shore of Lake Jacksonville can be seen for a portion of FM 747, looking east, for a short span south of US 79. The road has 2 lanes and no shoulders for its entire length. All of FM 747 is in west-central Cherokee County.

The road was commissioned in September 1947 originally, and has gone through 4 changes since, even though it is unclear as to when any part of FM 747 was constructed to completion. The Minute Order in September 1947 was for FM 747 to be 8.2 miles (13.2 km) from southwest of Jacksonville to US 79 in Jacksonville. October 1947 was the next dated Minute Order, adding 0.9 miles (1.4 km) further southwest. In 1949, another Minute Order added 7.2 miles (11.6 km), bringing FM 747 further south to an intersection with US 84 west of Maydelle. The change of FM 747's northern terminus was the subject of the August 1957 Minute Order, this took FM 747 outside Jacksonville (to make way for the construction of Lake Jacksonville) to a new terminus point on US 79. Finally, the road took its current shape with a Minute Order in October 1957, which added a 6.5 miles (10.5 km) western extension north of US 79.[25] The road serves the communities of Pierces Chapel and New Hope. The road connects the rural area to US 79 which goes east (but is signed north) to Jacksonville and west (but is signed south) to Palestine. FM 747 intersects with various county roads, its multiplex with US 79, and US 84, its southern terminus. A Union Pacific rail line also crosses the road just north of US 79.

FM 748[edit]

Farm to Market Road 748
Location:

FM 749[edit]

Farm to Market Road 749
Location:

FM 750[edit]

Farm to Market Road 750
Location:

FM 751[edit]

Farm to Market Road 751
Location: Hunt County, Van Zandt County[26]
Length: 15.6 mi (25.1 km)

Farm to Market Road 751 starts at a junction with FM 47 in Wills Point and heads north past Lake Tawakoni and through Hawk Cove before it comes to an end at a junction with FM 35 and State Highway 276 near Quinlan.

FM 752[edit]

Farm to Market Road 752
Location: AltoRusk
Length: 13.83 mi[27] (22.26 km)
Existed: 1947[27]–present

Farm to Market Road 752, or FM 752, in the eastern part of Texas (USA), runs about 13.83 miles (22.26 km) from an intersection with TX 294 in Alto, north past 2 intersections to downtown Rusk where it intersects FM 23, Loop 62, and US 84/TX 110. The road is located in central Cherokee County. Originally, FM 752 was shorter due to the commission in the Minute Order in 1947; its southern terminus was 7.8 miles (12.6 km) south of Rusk, then north to downtown Rusk. A 1972 Minute Order added 6.5 miles (10.5 km) more from another road, FM 2139 (current designation is RM 2139), which brought the southern terminus down to Alto.

FM 752 has 3 local street names: Quincy Avenue and Palestine Street in Alto, and Main Street in Rusk. Urban at each terminus and largely rural for the rest of its length, FM 752 passes by a landscape of rolling hills of trees and farmland. All of FM 752 has 2 lanes and no shoulders.

Even though FM 752 was originally commissioned in 1947, it is unclear exactly when any part of FM 752 was built. The road serves just the towns of Alto and Rusk. The southern terminus intersection connects to TX 294, which goes west to Elkhart and is a short distance from TX 21, which goes east to Nacogdoches and southwest to Crockett. The northern terminus connects to US 84, which goes east to Reklaw and Mount Enterprise, and west to Palestine) and TX 110, going north to New Summerfield and Troup; Loop 62 connects to 2 different intersections of US 69. FM 752 has intersections, besides those at county roads, at FM 241 just south of Rusk, FM 343 on the south side of Rusk, and its termini in Alto and Rusk.

FM 753[edit]

Farm to Market Road 753
Location:

FM 754[edit]

Farm to Market Road 754
Location:

FM 755[edit]

Farm to Market Road 755
Location:

FM 756[edit]

Farm to Market Road 756
Location:

FM 757[edit]

Farm to Market Road 757
Location:
Length: 7.43 mi[28] (11.96 km)
Existed: 1948–present

Farm to Market Road 757, or FM 757, is a road that runs from SH 31 to FM 16 at Starrville in Smith County.

FM 757 begins at an intersection with SH 31 in Smith County, where the road continues south as CR 21 (Red Bird Road). From this intersection, the route heads north on a two-lane undivided road, heading through wooded areas with some small fields and homes. The highway crosses FM 2767 and continues through more rural areas. FM 757 heads into a mix of farmland and woodland as it comes to an interchange with I-20. Past this interchange, the road runs between farms to the west and woods to the east, intersecting the western terminus of FM 1252 before crossing US 271. FM 757 runs through more agricultural and wooded areas, ending at an intersection with FM 16 in Starrville.[28][29][30]

The route (former War Highway 17) was designated in 1947 from US 271 to SH 31. In 1948, FM 757 was extended 1.8 miles from Starrville to US 271. The final change came in 1963, when FM 757 was extended to a rerouted SH 31, bringing FM 757 to its current configuration.[28]

FM 758[edit]

Farm to Market Road 758
Location:

FM 759[edit]

Farm to Market Road 759
Location:

FM 760[edit]

Farm to Market Road 760
Location:

FM 760 (1947)[edit]

Farm to Market Road 760
Location: Hutchinson and Hansford counties
Existed: December 17, 1947–October 28, 1948

The original FM 760 was designated on December 17, 1947 from FM 759 at or near Spearman south to the Hutchinson County line. FM 760 was cancelled on October 28, 1948 and combined with FM 279.

FM 761[edit]

Farm to Market Road 761
Location: Reeves County
Length: 2.51 mi[31] (4.04 km)
Existed: 1948[31]–present

Farm to Market Road 761 (FM 761) is a Farm to Market Road in the U.S. state of Texas maintained by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The 2.5-mile (4.0 km) route begins at State Highway 17 (SH 17) and follows city streets within the city of Pecos in Reeves County ending at Business Interstate 20-B (Bus. I-20-B).

FM 761 begins at SH 17 and follows southeast along Stafford Boulevard, a two-lane street, passing Reeves County Hospital before turning northeast onto South Eddy Street. At that point it becomes a mixed residential and commercial five-lane street including a center left-turn lane. Beyond West Walthall Street, the route turns toward the northwest passing the Pecos Technical Training Center of Odessa College. Beyond West 7th Street the roadway becomes a three-lane street with a left-turn lane before terminating at Bus. I-20-B.[32][33][34]

FM 761 was originally designated in 1948 as a 2.2-mile (3.5 km) highway from SH 17 along its current path on Stafford Boulevard and Eddy Street terminating at 8th Street. The route was extended to its current end at Bus. I-10-B in 1989.[31]

FM 762[edit]

Farm to Market Road 762
Location: Fort Bend County
Length: 21.328 mi[35] (34.324 km)
Existed: December 17, 1947 (1947-12-17)[35]–present

Farm to Market Road 762 (FM 762) is a state highway in the U.S. state of Texas that stays within Fort Bend County. The highway begins at FM 1462 south of Brazos Bend State Park, zig-zags in a northerly direction, crosses Interstate 69 (I-69)/U.S. Route 59 (US 59) and ends at U.S. Route 90 Alternate (US 90A) in Richmond.

FM 762 begins at a stop sign on FM 1462. At the intersection, southbound traffic on FM 762 can use a right-hand curve to access FM 1462 going west. After traveling 1.3 miles (2.1 km) north of the starting point, there is an intersection with Texas Park Road 72 at the entrance of Brazos Bend State Park. From the state park, FM 762 heads north, west, north and northwest for 5.9 miles (9.5 km) before reaching a three-way junction with FM 1994. In the northwesterly stretch, the highway crosses Big Creek and passes under electric transmission lines. At the intersection, FM 762 turns sharply to the northeast, then northwest, then northeast again before passing the George Ranch and curving to the north-northwest. The highway passes the George Ranch High School of the Lamar Consolidated Independent School District before crossing the BNSF Railway tracks and arriving at a stoplight-controlled intersection with FM 2759. From FM 1994 to FM 2759 at Crabb is a distance of 8.8 miles (14.2 km). At the intersection, FM 762 turns sharply left and parallels the BNSF tracks to the west-northwest for 2.5 miles (4.0 km) before coming to a stoplight at FM 2977. As highway starts to curve to the northwest, it crosses a bridge over I-69/US 59 at a distance of 0.3 miles (0.5 km) from the junction with FM 2977. There are shopping centers on the west side of the highway on both sides of I-69/US 59, which is locally called the Southwest Freeway. I-69/US 59 may be accessed in both directions via entrance ramps on the east side of FM 762. From I-69/US 59, FM 762 heads to the northwest alongside the railroad tracks for 1.2 miles (1.9 km) to reach the traffic signal at FM 1640. The George Memorial Library is located on the east side of the intersection. From FM 1640, the highway continues 1.3 miles (2.1 km) nearly north to the stoplight on US 90A at Jackson Street. There is also a spur connection which turns east onto Austin Street for several blocks, then north on Second Street to terminate at the west end of the Brazos River bridge on US 90A.[36]

FM 762 was originally designated on December 17, 1947, to start from US 59 at Richmond, go first to Crabb and then south to the Tadpole Road in the direction of Long Point. The total distance was 14.6 miles (23.5 km) and the leg from Crabb to the south was 8.9 miles (14.3 km) in length.[35] The end location was at the 2013 site of the intersection of FM 762 and FM 1994.[note 1] Note that a 1955 map shows that US 59 shared the same route that is used by US 90A in 2013, which is about 3.0 miles (4.8 km) north of the 2013 path of US 59.[37] On July 22, 1949, FM 762 was extended 4.4 miles (7.1 km) toward Long Point.[35]

On May 23, 1951, FM 762 was extended south approximately 10.0 miles (16.1 km) to the county line and then an additional 1.4 miles (2.3 km) into Brazoria County to SH 36 near Damon. At that time, the highway's total distance was 30.1 miles (48.4 km). On October 10, 1961, the last 7.1 miles (11.4 km) segment of the highway going northeast from Damon was transferred to FM 1462. The total length of the highway was 21.3 miles (34.3 km) in 1961. On August 27, 1963, a 0.7 miles (1.1 km) spur connection in Richmond was made by routing the highway east on Austin Street and north on South 2nd Street to US 59 (now US 90A).[35]

FM 763[edit]

Farm to Market Road 763
Location:

FM 764[edit]

Farm to Market Road 764
Location:

FM 765[edit]

Farm to Market Road 765
Location:

FM 766[edit]

Farm to Market Road 766
Location:

FM 767[edit]

Farm to Market Road 767
Location:

FM 768[edit]

Farm to Market Road 768
Location: Cherokee County
Length: 16.392 mi[38] (26.380 km)
Existed: 1947[38]–present

Farm to Market Road 768 (FM 768) is a farm-to-market road in the eastern part of the U.S. state of Texas. It travels approximately 16.39 miles (26.38 km) from an intersection with US 84/TX 110 in Rusk north through Gallatin, then northwestward into Jacksonville where it intersects US 69. The road is located in north-central Cherokee County.

FM 768 has 5 local street names: Henderson Street in Rusk; Chandler Street and 1st Avenue (at its concurrence with FM  22) in Gallatin; and Corinth Road, Beaumont Street, and Adams Street in Jacksonville. The highway is a urban at each terminus and mostly rural for the rest of its length. FM 768 passes by a landscape of rolling hills of trees and farmland. While somewhat winding between Rusk and Gallatin, FM 768 is much more so with several twisty corners between Gallatin and Jacksonville. All of FM 768 has 2 lanes and no shoulders.

The original section of FM 768, from the US 69 intersection southeastward for 8.3 miles (13.4 km) was commissioned by Minute Order in 1947, then another Minute Order added in 1953, 2.4 miles (3.9 km) more, intersecting the road with FM 22 in Gallatin. In 1958, FM 854 was cancelled and the mileage added to FM 768's to extend the road to Rusk. It is unclear, exactly when any part of FM 768 was built. The road serves just the 3 towns of Rusk, Gallatin, and Jacksonville. The southern terminus connects to US 84/SH 110. The northern terminus intersection connects to US 69. FM 768 only has intersections at county roads, besides its concurrency with FM 22 in Gallatin, its crossing of Loop 456, and its termini.

FM 769[edit]

Farm to Market Road 769
Location: Yoakum and Cochran counties
Length: 41.721 mi[39] (67.143 km)
Existed: November 18, 1947[39]–present

Farm to Market Road 769, Farm Road 769, or FM 769, also known as State Line Rd., is a Farm to Market Road in the U.S. state of Texas maintained by the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The 42-mile (68 km) road runs along the New Mexico state line in Yoakum and Cochran counties from SH 83 near Denver City to SH 125 near Bledsoe and passes through the small community of Bronco. The road has major intersections with US 82, US 380, and FM 1585. FM 769 was formerly part of a much longer route that included the current SH 125 and was unofficially signed as SH 125 for several decades.

FM 769 begins at SH 83 near the point where SH 83 crosses the New Mexico state line and meets NM 132 west of Denver City in southwestern Yoakum County. FM 769 continues northward closely following the state line and crossing US 82[40] southwest of Plains.[41] The road continues north along the state link intersecting US 380 at Bronco northwest of Plains before crossing into Cochran County.[41] The road then intersects FM 1585 before the road ends at SH 125 near the point where SH 125 meets NM 125 southwest of Bledsoe.[42] FM 769 passes through mostly agricultural lands and oil and gas fields across the largely flat and featureless terrain of the Llano Estacado.[43][44][45]

The route was originally designated in Cochran County between SH 214 in Lehman and SH 290,[46] now SH 114 in Whiteface in 1947.[39] That route was extended to the New Mexico state line the following year,[39] while also being extended 10 miles (16 km) southward from Whiteface[39][47] to an intersection with a road that two years later would become FM 301[48] In 1952, FM 769 was extended southward 9.7 miles (15.6 km) along the New Mexico state line.[39]

The route was first unofficially signed as SH 125 while officially maintaining its Farm to Market designation in 1955[49] allowing the route to be numerically continuous with the connecting New Mexico route. The following year, the portion of the route from FM 301 to SH 116 as the current SH 114 was designated between 1955 to 1978[50] was designated as an extension to FM 1780 with FM 769 ending where it intersected FM 1780.[39][47] In 1962, the designation of FM 2010 was canceled and combined with FM 769 extending the route 11.5 miles (18.5 km) south along the state line to FM 1077 in Yoakum County. 12.2 miles (19.6 km) of new designation were added in addition from the south end of FM 769 to US 380, the north end of FM 2010.[39][51] FM 1077 was renumbered as part of US 82 the following year.[39][52] The route was extended 8.5 miles (13.7 km) farther south along the state line to SH 83 west of Denver City in 1970.[39]

The SH 125 state highway designation became official in 1990,[49] and the FM 769 designation was eliminated.[39] In 1990, SH 125 was reassigned along its current alignment from the state line to SH 114 in Whiteface,[49] and FM 769 was recreated along the state line from US 83 to SH 125 the following year.[39]

FM 770[edit]

Farm to Market Road 770
Location:

FM 771[edit]

Farm to Market Road 771
Location:

FM 772[edit]

Farm to Market Road 772
Location:

FM 773[edit]

Farm to Market Road 773
Location:

FM 774[edit]

Farm to Market Road 774
Location:

FM 775[edit]

Farm to Market Road 775
Location:

FM 776[edit]

Farm to Market Road 776
Location:

FM 777[edit]

Farm to Market Road 777
Location:

FM 778[edit]

Farm to Market Road 778
Location:

FM 779[edit]

Farm to Market Road 779
Location:

FM 780[edit]

Farm to Market Road 780
Location:

FM 781[edit]

Farm to Market Road 781
Location: Andrews County
Existed: May 7, 1948–December 18, 1990

Farm to Market Road 781 was a designation applied to a highway in Andrews County. There is currently no highway using the FM 781 designation.

FM 781 was designated on May 7, 1948 from the Texas/New Mexico state line east to FM 703 (now SH 115), 19 miles southwest of Andrews. FM 781 was cancelled on December 18, 1990 and transferred to State Highway 128.

FM 782[edit]

Farm to Market Road 782
Location:

RM 783[edit]

Ranch to Market Road 783
Location:

FM 784[edit]

Farm to Market Road 784
Location:

FM 785[edit]

Farm to Market Road 785
Location:

FM 786[edit]

Farm to Market Road 786
Location:

FM 787[edit]

Farm to Market Road 787
Location:

FM 788[edit]

Farm to Market Road 788
Location:

FM 789[edit]

Farm to Market Road 789
Location:

FM 790[edit]

Farm to Market Road 790
Location:

FM 791[edit]

Farm to Market Road 791
Location:

FM 792[edit]

Farm to Market Road 792
Location:

FM 793[edit]

Farm to Market Road 793
Location:

FM 794[edit]

Farm to Market Road 794
Location:

FM 795[edit]

Farm to Market Road 795
Location:

FM 796[edit]

Farm to Market Road 796
Location:

FM 797[edit]

Farm to Market Road 797
Location:

FM 798[edit]

Farm to Market Road 798
Location:

FM 799[edit]

Farm to Market Road 799
Location:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 700". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved 1 March 2016. 
  2. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 703". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2014-08-28. 
  3. ^ a b Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 707". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 18, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 712". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 11, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b Google (March 11, 2013). "List of Farm to Market Roads in Texas (700–799)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved March 11, 2013. 
  6. ^ Aubrey, Betty Dooley (2005). Why Stop? A Guide to Texas Historical Road Markers. Lanham, Md.: Taylor Trade Publications. pp. 319–320. Retrieved March 10, 2013. 
  7. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 720". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2014-08-28. 
  8. ^ a b c Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 720". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2011-01-13. 
  9. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2012). Texas County Map Book (PDF) (Map) (2012 ed.). 1:120,000. Texas Department of Transportation. p. 480. OCLC 867856197. Retrieved 2011-01-13. [dead link]
  10. ^ a b c Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 723". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 8, 2013. 
  11. ^ Google (February 4, 2013). "List of Farm to Market Roads in Texas (700–799)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved February 4, 2013. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 725". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 4, 2011. 
  13. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2014). Texas County Map Book (PDF) (Map) (2014 ed.). 1:120,000. Texas Department of Transportation. p. 369. Retrieved December 4, 2014. 
  14. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2014). Texas County Map Book (PDF) (Map) (2014 ed.). 1:120,000. Texas Department of Transportation. p. 368. Retrieved December 4, 2014. 
  15. ^ Texas Department of Transportation, [1]
  16. ^ a b Texas Department of Transportation, [2]
  17. ^ a b Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 740". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 27, 2013. 
  18. ^ "Rockwall County-Official Website - FM 740 Widening". Rockwall County. Retrieved December 27, 2013. 
  19. ^ "Public Hearing - FM 740 (Rockwall County)". TxDOT. Retrieved December 27, 2013. 
  20. ^ a b c Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 742". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 8, 2012. 
  21. ^ a b Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2012). Texas County Map Book (PDF) (Map) (2012 ed.). 1:120,000. Texas Department of Transportation. p. 486. OCLC 867856197. Retrieved May 4, 2012. [dead link]
  22. ^ Google (March 8, 2012). "Overview map of Farm to Market Road 742" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved March 8, 2012. 
  23. ^ Google (March 8, 2012). "Overview map of Chappel Hill Road" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved March 8, 2012. 
  24. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division. "Ranch/Farm Road Fun Facts". Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 8, 2012. 
  25. ^ a b c Texas Department of Transportation, [3]
  26. ^ Farm to Market Road 751
  27. ^ a b Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 752". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 18, 2012. 
  28. ^ a b c Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 757". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  29. ^ Google (October 27, 2011). "overview of Farm to Market Road 757" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  30. ^ County Grid Map 552 (PDF) (Map). Texas Department of Transportation. 2010. Retrieved October 27, 2011. 
  31. ^ a b c Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 761". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 14, 2012. 
  32. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2012). Texas County Map Book (PDF) (Map) (2012 ed.). 1:120,000. Texas Department of Transportation. p. 115. OCLC 867856197. Retrieved April 14, 2012. [dead link]
  33. ^ Google (April 14, 2012). "Route of FM 761" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 14, 2012. 
  34. ^ Google (April 14, 2012). "Satellite view of FM 761" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 14, 2012. 
  35. ^ a b c d e Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 762". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved January 13, 2013. 
  36. ^ Google (April 26, 2013). "List of Farm to Market Roads in Texas (700–799)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 26, 2013. 
  37. ^ "Sugar Land Quadrangle 15 Minute Series". United States Geological Survey. 1955. Retrieved January 12, 2013. 
  38. ^ a b "FARM TO MARKET ROAD NO. 768". Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved November 25, 2014. 
  39. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 769". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved 2015-12-02. 
  40. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2012). Texas County Map Book (PDF) (Map) (2012 ed.). 1:120,000. Texas Department of Transportation. p. 138. OCLC 867856197. Retrieved April 30, 2011. [dead link]
  41. ^ a b Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2012). Texas County Map Book (PDF) (Map) (2012 ed.). 1:120,000. Texas Department of Transportation. p. 137. OCLC 867856197. Retrieved April 30, 2011. [dead link]
  42. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (2012). Texas County Map Book (PDF) (Map) (2012 ed.). 1:120,000. Texas Department of Transportation. p. 136. OCLC 867856197. Retrieved April 30, 2011. [dead link]
  43. ^ Hobbs, New Mexico-Texas (PDF) (Map) (1978 ed.). 1:100,000. 30x60 minute series (topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 30, 2011. 
  44. ^ Tatum, New Mexico-Texas (PDF) (Map) (1978 ed.). 1:100,000. 30x60 minute series (topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 30, 2011. 
  45. ^ Elida, New Mexico-Texas (PDF) (Map) (1979 ed.). 1:100,000. 30x60 minute series (topographic). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved April 30, 2011. 
  46. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "State Highway No. 290". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 30, 2011. 
  47. ^ a b Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 1780". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 30, 2011. 
  48. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 301". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 30, 2011. 
  49. ^ a b c Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "State Highway No. 125". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 30, 2011. 
  50. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "State Highway No. 116". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 30, 2011. 
  51. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Farm to Market Road No. 2010". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 30, 2011. 
  52. ^ Transportation Planning and Programming Division (n.d.). "Ranch to Market Road No. 1077". Highway Designation Files. Texas Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 30, 2011. 
  1. ^ This was determined by measuring 8.9 miles of map distance on the 2013 highway starting from Crabb.