Farwana

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Farwana
Farwana is located in Mandatory Palestine
Farwana
Farwana
Arabic فرونه
Also spelled Khirbet Farwana, Rohob, Rehob, Tel Rehov
Subdistrict Baysan
Coordinates 32°27′47″N 35°29′37″E / 32.46306°N 35.49361°E / 32.46306; 35.49361Coordinates: 32°27′47″N 35°29′37″E / 32.46306°N 35.49361°E / 32.46306; 35.49361
Palestine grid 196/207
Population 330[1][2] (1945)
Area 4,996[1] dunams
Date of depopulation 11 May 1948[3]
Cause(s) of depopulation Military assault by Yishuv forces
Current localities Rechov

Farwana (Arabic: فرونه‎‎) was a Palestinian village, located 4.5 kilometers (2.8 mi) south of Bisan, depopulated in 1948.

History[edit]

Identified with the ancient city of Rehov, extant during Egyptian rule over Canaan in the second millennium BCE, archaeological sites located on the former village's lands include Tell es-Sarem (i.e. Tel Rehov)[4] and the remains of a synagogue from the third century CE.[5]

Identification of Tel Rehov with the Rehob of the Egyptian texts was based on the preservation of the name at the nearby Islamic holy tomb of esh-Sheikh er-Rihab (1 kilometer to the south of the tel) and the existence of the ruins of a Byzantine era Jewish town of the same name (Rohob), 1 kilometer northwest of Tel Rehov, mentioned by Eusebius as being in the fourth mile from Bisan.[4] Khirbet Farwana (Khirbet meaning "site of ruins" in Arabic) is also associated with Rohob.[4]

British Mandate era[edit]

In the 1922 census of Palestine, conducted in Mandatory Palestine authorities, Farwaneh had a population of 84 Muslims,[6] increasing in the 1931 census to 286, still all Muslims, in 72 houses.[7]

In 1945, the population was 330 Muslims, with a total of 4,996 dunams of land.[1][2] Of this, 42 dunams were for plantations or irrigable land, 3,847 for cereals,[8] while 11 were built-up (urban) land.[9]

1948 war and its aftermath[edit]

Farwana had a population of over 300 people when it was depopulated in the lead up to the 1948 Arab-Israeli war.[5] Its Arab inhabitants, along with those of the neighbouring village of al-Ashrafiyya fled to Jordan with the approach of the pre-state Israeli forces of the Golani Brigade during Operation Gideon on 11 May 1948.[5][10] The following day, the more than 72 houses that made up the village were completely destroyed.[5] Farwana's inhabitants never returned to the village, and they and their descendants make up one small part of the current population of more than 4 million Palestinian refugees worldwide.

The Jewish localities of Rechov, Chawwat Eden, and Ein HaNatziv were established on the former lands of Farwana.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 43
  2. ^ a b Department of Statistics, 1945, p. 6
  3. ^ Morris, 2004, p. xvii village #128. Also give cause for depopulation
  4. ^ a b c Amihai Mazar (1999). "The 1997-1998 Excavations at Tel Rehov: Preliminary Report". Israel Exploration Journal 49: 1–42. 
  5. ^ a b c d e Khalidi, 1992, pp. 46-47
  6. ^ Barron, 1923, Table IX, p. 31
  7. ^ Mills, 1932, p. 78
  8. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 84
  9. ^ Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. Village Statistics, April, 1945. Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 134
  10. ^ Morris, 2004, p. 227

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]