Fay-Cooper Cole

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Fay-Cooper Cole (1881-1961).

Fay-Cooper Cole (8 August 1881 – 3 September 1961) was a professor of anthropology and founder of the anthropology department[1] at the University of Chicago and was a student of Franz Boas. Most famously, he was a witness for the defense for John Scopes at the Scopes Trial.[2][3] Cole also played a central role in planning the anthropology exhibits for the 1933 Century of Progress World's Fair. He was elected a Member of the American Philosophical Society in 1941.

Works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eggan, Fred (1963). "Fay-Cooper Cole 1881-1961". American Anthropologist. 65 (3): 641–648. doi:10.1525/aa.1963.65.3.02a00090.
  2. ^ "50 Years Ago: A Witness at the Scopes Trial".
  3. ^ "Fay-Cooper Cole | American anthropologist".

External links[edit]

References[edit]

Redman, Samuel J. Bone Rooms: From Scientific Racism to Human Prehistory in Museum (Cambridge: Harvard University Press). 2016.