February 1932

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The following events occurred in February 1932:

February 1, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

February 2, 1932 (Tuesday)[edit]

February 3, 1932 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • It came to light that Adolf Hitler may be a German citizen after all, which would make him eligible to run for president. It was revealed that in 1930, Thuringian Interior Minister Wilhelm Frick had appointed Hitler as police commissioner of the town of Hildburghausen. According to law, a German official automatically became a citizen. Hitler downplayed the revelation, saying he had refused the appointment and that "these are not the means by which I expect to become a German citizen."[7]
  • Born: Peggy Ann Garner, actress, in Canton, Ohio (d. 1984)

February 4, 1932 (Thursday)[edit]

February 5, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

  • Latvia and the Soviet Union signed a non-aggression pact.[4]
  • Mahatma Gandhi's spinning wheel, along with a few other items, were seized by the government for nonpayment of taxes.[9]
  • In Indian River, Florida, Garfield Wood set a new boat speed record of 111.72 mph in the Miss America IX.[10]
  • Died: Barney Dreyfuss, 66, American baseball executive

February 6, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

February 7, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands signed the Oslo Convention, an economic cooperation plan.[4]
  • Al Smith announced he was running for President of the United States again.[13]
  • Born: Gay Talese, author, in Ocean City, New Jersey

February 8, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

February 9, 1932 (Tuesday)[edit]

February 10, 1932 (Wednesday)[edit]

February 11, 1932 (Thursday)[edit]

February 12, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

  • Pope Pius XI marked the tenth anniversary of his coronation with a speech before thousands in St. Peter's Basilica. He said he hoped that all would with him in prayers that "the Supreme Lord of all things earthly should cause peace to return to the earth."[16]
  • Born: Julian Simon, economist and author, in Chevy Chase, Maryland (d. 1998)

February 13, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

February 14, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

February 15, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

  • 84-year-old Paul von Hindenburg agreed to run again for President of Germany in the March 13 election. "The appeal to stand for re-election came to me not from a party but from the broad masses of people", Hindenburg said. "Therefore, I recognize it as my duty to stand."[23]
  • The Winter Olympics in Lake Placid closed. The United States won the medal count with 6 gold medals and 12 overall.
  • The U.S. Supreme Court decided Blackmer v. United States.
  • Died: Minnie Maddern Fiske, 66, American actress

February 16, 1932 (Tuesday)[edit]

February 17, 1932 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Over a month after the manhunt for Albert Johnson began, the posse caught up to him and finally killed him in a shootout. An officer was seriously wounded, but survived. The case thrilled the public and popularized the saying "the Mounties always get their man".[6]
  • Died: Albert Johnson, criminal (killed in shootout with Canadian law enforcement)

February 18, 1932 (Thursday)[edit]

February 19, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

  • The British government established an emergency "council of action" with full powers to take any measures deemed necessary to protect British interests in Shanghai.[24]
  • Symphonic Ode by Aaron Copland was performed for the first time in Boston's Symphony Hall.[2]

February 20, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

February 21, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

February 22, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

  • The Bicentennial of George Washington's Birthday was observed in the United States. President Herbert Hoover addressed a joint session of Congress opening celebrations that were to continue through Thanksgiving Day. "The true eulogy of Washington is this mighty Nation", Hoover said. "He contributed more to its origins than any other man. The influence of his character and of his accomplishments has contributed to the building of human freedom and ordered liberty, not alone upon this continent but upon all continents."[27] John Philip Sousa conducted the combined band of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps in front of the United States Capitol in the first performance of Sousa's George Washington Bicentennial March.[2] The George Washington Memorial Bridge in Seattle was dedicated.[28]
  • Joseph Goebbels announced the candidacy of Adolf Hitler for President of Germany at a Nazi rally in the Berlin Sportpalast. Hitler, who was not present at the rally, still needed to establish German citizenship before the March 13 election.[29]
  • Born: Ted Kennedy, politician, in Boston, Massachusetts (d. 2009); Robert Opron, automotive designer, in France
  • Died: Johanna Gadski, 60, German soprano (car accident)

February 23, 1932 (Tuesday)[edit]

February 24, 1932 (Wednesday)[edit]

February 25, 1932 (Thursday)[edit]

February 26, 1932 (Friday)[edit]

February 27, 1932 (Saturday)[edit]

February 28, 1932 (Sunday)[edit]

February 29, 1932 (Monday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tageseinträge für 1. Februar 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "1932". Music And History. Archived from the original on April 1, 2015. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  3. ^ a b Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 411. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  4. ^ a b c d e "Chronology 1932". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  5. ^ "Terry Druggan Gets 2 1/2 Years for Tax Fraud". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 3, 1932. p. 1.
  6. ^ a b Smith, Barbara (2009). The Mad Trapper: Unearthing a Mystery. Heritage House. ISBN 978-1-927051-08-5.
  7. ^ "Reveal Move by Hitler to Run for President". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 4, 1932. p. 7.
  8. ^ Pegler, Westbrook (February 5, 1932). "Americans Lead as Olympic Games Open". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 23.
  9. ^ "Seize Gandhi's Spinning Wheel for Tax Default". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 6, 1932. p. 2.
  10. ^ Knowles, Arthur; Beech, Graham (2005). The Bluebird Years: Donald Campbell and the Pursuit of Speed. Wilmslow: Sigma Press. p. 22. ISBN 978-1-85058-766-8.
  11. ^ "Land U.S. Troops in China". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 6, 1932. p. 1.
  12. ^ Knopf, Robert (1999). The Theater and Cinema of Buster Keaton. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press. p. 190. ISBN 0-691-00441-2.
  13. ^ Pettey, Tom (February 8, 1932). "Al Smith Candidate Again". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  14. ^ "Guilty; Ruth Judd to Hang". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 9, 1932. p. 1.
  15. ^ "Duce Like King As He Has First Visit With Pope". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 11, 1932. p. 1.
  16. ^ "Pope Pius Prays for 'Return of Peace to Earth'". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 13, 1932. p. 5.
  17. ^ "Mount Hinks". United States Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  18. ^ "Mount Marsden". United States Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  19. ^ "Rouse Islands". United States Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  20. ^ Curran, Hugh (February 15, 1932). "Irish Candidate and Aid Killd on Eve of Vote". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  21. ^ Reilly, Gavan (January 27, 2013). "Ultimate sacrifice: the Gardaí who have been killed on duty". TheJournal.ie. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  22. ^ Farrar, Carolyn (May 5, 2010). "Donegal man to be honoured nearly 80 years after his death". Donegal Democrat. Archived from the original on May 28, 2015. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  23. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (February 16, 1932). "Von Hindenburg Heeds Plea of Germans to Run". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 6.
  24. ^ "Britain Creates 'War Council' on Shanghai Crisis". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 20, 1932. p. 2.
  25. ^ Taylor, Edmond (February 21, 1932). "Tardieu is Back in Saddle; Picks French Cabinet". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 19.
  26. ^ "Soviets Banish Trotzky and 36 Others For Life". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 22, 1932. p. 21.
  27. ^ Peters, Gerbhard; Woolley, John T. "Address to a Joint Session of Congress Opening the Celebration of the Bicentennial of the Birth of George Washington". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  28. ^ McNerthney, Casey (June 9, 2010). "From the archives: History of the Aurora Bridge". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  29. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (February 23, 1932). "Hitler Enters German Race for President". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  30. ^ "Tageseinträge für 23. Februar 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  31. ^ "Police Gazette Gives Way to Modern Age". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 24, 1932. p. 1.
  32. ^ "Police Gazette Sold for $545; Buyer Not Named". Chicago Daily Tribune: 27. May 27, 1932.
  33. ^ "Outright Land Speed Record History". Bluebird Electric. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  34. ^ Domarus, Max (1990). The Complete Hitler: Speeches and Proclamations. Wauconda, Illinois: Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers. p. 119.
  35. ^ a b "Tageseinträge für 26. Februar 1932". chroniknet. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  36. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (February 27, 1932). "Bruening Turns Back Foes Four Times in a Day". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 8.
  37. ^ "Capone Losesl Prison Nears". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 28, 1932. p. 1.
  38. ^ "The Massie Trials: A Chronology". UMKC School of Law. Retrieved May 28, 2015.
  39. ^ "Finland's Army Fights to Stop Move on Capital". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 1, 1932. p. 5.
  40. ^ Bateson, Frederick Wilse (1969). The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature, Volume III. Cambridge University Press. p. 618.