February 1934

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The following events occurred in February 1934:

February 1, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Greece failed to deport the American fugitive businessman Samuel Insull by January 31 as pledged, leaving the condition of the case unclear.[1] The United States government had the invalidated passport of Insull, who was reportedly ill, renewed in order to expedite his departure.[2]

February 2, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

February 3, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

February 4, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Demonstrators in Paris began protesting Daladier's removal of Jean Chiappe.[8]
  • Cuba adopted a new provisional constitution.[9]

February 5, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

  • Mounted French troops clashed with thousands of angry war veterans enraged by the removal of popular police prefect Jean Chiappe.[10]
  • Lord Ashley filed suit for divorce from wife Sylvia, naming Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. as co-respondent.[11]
  • Rioting broke out in the streets of New York over the cab driver strike as strikers fought with police and burned independent cabs.[6]
  • In Paris, the Surrealist group led by André Breton put Salvador Dalí on "trial" for his troubling interest in Hitler as well as his painting The Enigma of William Tell. The painting depicted a deformed, semi-nude figure bearing the facial features of Vladimir Lenin, something that failed to amuse the Surrealists as many of them were communists. Dalí made a mockery of the proceedings by showing up with a thermometer in his mouth and seven thick sweaters on, which he proceeded to remove one at a time and put on again while taking his temperature. With one sweater left, Dalí told Breton that if he dreamed that night of the two of them making love to each other, he would not hesitate to paint the scene the next morning in great detail ("I don't advise it, my friend", was all Breton managed to say in response.) Then, stripping to the waist, Dalí knelt on the carpet and swore that he was no enemy of the proletariat, ending the bizarre event.[12][13][14]
  • Born: Hank Aaron, baseball player, in Mobile, Alabama

February 6, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

February 7, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

February 8, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

February 9, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

February 10, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

  • 20 socialist leaders in Lithuania were arrested in Memel and charged with organizing a movement similar to the Nazi Party.[18]
  • Born: Fleur Adcock, poet and editor, in Auckland, New Zealand

February 11, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

February 12, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

February 13, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

February 14, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

February 15, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

February 16, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

February 17, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

  • Britain, France and Italy released a joint statement guaranteeing Austria's "independence and integrity in accordance with the relevant treaties." A German spokesperson responded, "The prerequisite of independence is that people shall have a government which they themselves desire. It logically follows that independence is in danger if and when attempts are made to prevent people from having a government they want. Austria should have a government which has the nation behind it."[30]
  • Born: Alan Bates, actor, in Allestree, Derbyshire, England (d. 2003); Barry Humphries, actor and comedian, in Kew, Melbourne, Australia
  • Died: Albert I of Belgium, 58, King of the Belgians (mountaineering accident)

February 18, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

February 19, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

  • The body of King Albert of Belgium was brought to the royal palace in Brussels where it was to lie in state until Thursday.[32]

February 20, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

February 21, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

February 22, 1934 (Thursday)[edit]

February 23, 1934 (Friday)[edit]

February 24, 1934 (Saturday)[edit]

February 25, 1934 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Over 1 million Nazi leaders and sub-leaders swore allegiance to Hitler over the radio in a ceremony presided over by Rudolf Hess.[41]
  • Died: John McGraw, 60, American baseball player and manager

February 26, 1934 (Monday)[edit]

  • 5 were killed and 40 injured in Pittsburgh when a train plummeted off a 30-foot high viaduct.[42]

February 27, 1934 (Tuesday)[edit]

February 28, 1934 (Wednesday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Speck, Eugene (February 1, 1934). "Mystery Veils Insulls Case; Still in Athens". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  2. ^ Speck, Eugene (February 2, 1934). "U. S. Speeds Up Insull's Exit; O. K.'s Passport". Chicago Daily Tribune: 3. 
  3. ^ Darrah, David (February 3, 1934). "100,000 Farmers Hail Dolfuss; Parade in Vienna". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4. 
  4. ^ a b "Chronology 1934". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  5. ^ Taylor, Edmond (February 4, 1934). "French Premier Fires Chiappe; 3 Ministers Quit". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 2. 
  6. ^ a b c Hodges, Graham Russell Gao (2007). Taxi!: A Social History of the New York City Cabdriver. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 53–55. ISBN 978-0-8018-9219-6. 
  7. ^ "Tageseinträge für 3. Februar 1934". chroniknet. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  8. ^ Taylor, Edmond (February 5, 1934). "France Masses Troops as New Rioting Flares". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  9. ^ "Cuban Regime Adopts a New 'Magna Charta'". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 5, 1934. p. 6. 
  10. ^ "French Troops Fight Rioters; Paris Panicky". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 6, 1934. p. 1. 
  11. ^ Steele, John (February 6, 1934). "Peer Sues; Named Doug., Sr". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  12. ^ Etherington-Smith, Meredith (1995). The Persistence of Memory: A Biography of Dalí. Da Capo Press. pp. 169–172. ISBN 978-0-306-80662-9. 
  13. ^ Greeley, Robin Adèle (2006). Surrealism and the Spanish Civil War. Yale University Press. p. 54. ISBN 978-0-300-11295-5. 
  14. ^ Shanes, Eric (2011). Dalí. Parkstone International. pp. 54–55. ISBN 978-1-78042-472-9. 
  15. ^ a b c d e "1934". MusicAndHistory. Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  16. ^ "Britain Merges Cunard, White Stasr Ship Lines". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 9, 1934. p. 15. 
  17. ^ "Taxi Men Sign Mayor's Pact; Strike Is Over". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 9, 1934. p. 5. 
  18. ^ "Lithuania Jails 20 in Memel as Nazi Plotters". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 11, 1934. p. 6. 
  19. ^ "Mikado Eases Prison Terms of 140,000 Felons". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 11, 1934. p. 12. 
  20. ^ "Tageseinträge für 11. Februar 1934". chroniknet. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  21. ^ a b Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 437. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  22. ^ "Tageseinträge für 12. Februar 1934". chroniknet. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  23. ^ Gardner, Nicky; Kries, Susanne (January 5, 2014). "The Chelyuskin Epic". Hidden Europe. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  24. ^ "The Shining Hour". Playbill Vault. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  25. ^ "Hitler Decrees End of German States' Council". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 15, 1934. p. 5. 
  26. ^ "Ponzi Released, But Deportation is Next Worry". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 15, 1934. p. 5. 
  27. ^ "Greek Government Decides Not to Expel Samuel Insull". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 16, 1934. p. 4. 
  28. ^ "Tageseinträge für 15. Februar 1934". chroniknet. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  29. ^ Darrah, David (February 17, 1934). "Austria Hangs Rebels; Many Facing Death". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  30. ^ "3 Powers Tell Hitler to Keep Out of Austria". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 18, 1934. p. 1. 
  31. ^ House, Ann Somers (February 19, 1934). "Prince Ends Ski Trip to Become Belgians' King". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  32. ^ House, Ann Somers (February 20, 1934). "100,000 War Vets Salute Dead Monarch". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  33. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (February 21, 1934). "Disown Prince of Sweden for Actress' Match". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  34. ^ Ranke, Jason Adams (2009). The Anglo-American Press and the "secret" Rearmament of Hitler's Germany. ProQuest LLC. p. 79. 
  35. ^ "Germany Jails 11 Who Raise Prices But Not Wages". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 22, 1934. p. 1. 
  36. ^ House, Ann Somers (February 23, 1934). "Belgium Buries Albert; Crowns New King Today". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 11. 
  37. ^ House, Ann Somers (February 24, 1934). "Leopold is Made King; His Queen Steals the Show". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5. 
  38. ^ "Huey Long's Share Our Wealth Speech". HueyLong.com. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  39. ^ "Death Takes a Holiday (1934)". Toronto Film Society. October 21, 2014. Retrieved June 29, 2015. 
  40. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (February 25, 1934). "Carry on Nazi Drive, Hitler Urges Germans". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 3. 
  41. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (February 26, 1934). "Million Nazis Take Oath to Die for Hitler". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1. 
  42. ^ "Train Crash in Pittsburgh; 5 Die; 40 Hurt". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 27, 1934. p. 1. 
  43. ^ "Deported Red Tells of Nazi Prison Torture". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 28, 1934. p. 8. 
  44. ^ Steele, John (March 2, 1934). "House Dumps Dole Marchers Out After 'Riot'". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 11. 
  45. ^ Herspring, Dale Roy (2001). Soldiers, Commissars, and Chaplains: Civil-military Relations Since Cromwell. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 131–132. ISBN 978-0-7425-1106-4.