February 1936

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The following events occurred in February 1936:

February 1, 1936 (Saturday)[edit]

  • An appeal from Benito Mussolini to "the students of Europe" was published in Il Popolo d'Italia, claiming that Italy wanted peace in Europe but sanctions against the country would lead to a war for which Italy would not be responsible.[1]
  • Died: Georgios Kondylis, 57, Greek general and two-time Prime Minister of Greece

February 2, 1936 (Sunday)[edit]

February 3, 1936 (Monday)[edit]

February 4, 1936 (Tuesday)[edit]

February 5, 1936 (Wednesday)[edit]

February 6, 1936 (Thursday)[edit]

February 7, 1936 (Friday)[edit]

  • The last inmates in Welfare Island, widely considered the worst prison in the United States, were transferred to Rikers Island so the old prison could be razed and replaced with a park and hospital.[8]

February 8, 1936 (Saturday)[edit]

February 9, 1936 (Sunday)[edit]

February 10, 1936 (Monday)[edit]

February 11, 1936 (Tuesday)[edit]

February 12, 1936 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • A severe cold wave swept across North America, breaking numerous records and crippling transportation services.[13]
  • A committee of experts reported to the League of Nations that an oil embargo against Italy would take three and a half months to become effective, and even that would only be if the United States agreed to curtail its booming oil business with Italy.[14][15][16]
  • A short-circuit started a fire in a Manhattan café that killed 5 people and injured 37. The incident would have been minor were it not for the panic causing a crowded dash down the stairways.[17]

February 13, 1936 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Charles Maurras published a column in Action Française calling for "the knife" to be used against politicians who supported sanctions against Italy. That same day, French politician Léon Blum was attacked and cut about the head by student followers of Maurras.[1][18] That night, the French government banned the Action Française, Camelots du Roi and Royalist Students' Association under the law passed in December prohibiting extremist political leagues.[19]

February 14, 1936 (Friday)[edit]

February 15, 1936 (Saturday)[edit]

February 16, 1936 (Sunday)[edit]

February 17, 1936 (Monday)[edit]

February 18, 1936 (Tuesday)[edit]

February 19, 1936 (Wednesday)[edit]

February 20, 1936 (Thursday)[edit]

February 21, 1936 (Friday)[edit]

  • The new Spanish government freed 34,000 political prisoners.[28]

February 22, 1936 (Saturday)[edit]

  • On George Washington's 204th birthday, retired baseball legend Walter Johnson replicated a feat attributed to Washington by throwing a silver dollar across the Rappahannock River. Though it remained in dispute whether Washington ever did such a thing, Johnson did prove that it could be done.[29][30]
  • Nazi Germany established quotas for Jewish doctors. The decree by Gerhard Wagner stated that the proportion of Jewish doctors in Germany could not exceed the proportion of Jews in the country's general population.[31]
  • Born: Elizabeth MacRae, actress, in Columbia, North Carolina

February 23, 1936 (Sunday)[edit]

  • Puerto Rico's Chief of Police E. Francis Riggs was shot and killed by two young Nationalists. The two assailants were captured and executed immediately without trial.[32][33]

February 24, 1936 (Monday)[edit]

  • Anthony Eden addressed the House of Commons for the first time as Foreign Secretary. He responded to criticism of the League of Nations failing to impose oil sanctions on Italy by explaining that oil was "a sanction like any other and must be judged by the same criterion, whether its imposition will help stop the war."[1]
  • Born: Lance Reventlow, entrepreneur and racing driver, in London, England (d. 1972)
  • Died: Albert Ritchie, 59, American lawyer and politician

February 25, 1936 (Tuesday)[edit]

February 26, 1936 (Wednesday)[edit]

February 27, 1936 (Thursday)[edit]

February 28, 1936 (Friday)[edit]

February 29, 1936 (Saturday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Baer, George W. (1976). Test Case : Italy, Ethiopia, and the League of Nations. Leland Stanford Junior University. pp. 210, 213.
  2. ^ "Japanese Raids Made to Incite War, Reds Claim". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 4, 1936. p. 4.
  3. ^ "Borah Enters Candidacy in Ohio Primary". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 5, 1936. p. 1.
  4. ^ a b c d e "1936". MusicAndHistory. Archived from the original on June 10, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  5. ^ "Crush Greets N. Y. Premiere of Chaplin Film". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 6, 1936. p. 15.
  6. ^ "80,000 Hail Olympics; U.S. Wins in Hockey". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 6, 1936. pp. 1, 24.
  7. ^ Lederman, Marsha (August 23, 2012). "A glimpse of Canada at the 1936 Nazi Games". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  8. ^ "'Worst Prison' in U.S. is Vacatedl Inmates Put in Model Jail". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 8, 1936. p. 2.
  9. ^ a b c Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 463. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  10. ^ "Tageseinträge für 9. Februar 1936". chroniknet. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  11. ^ "Huey Long's Widow Sworn as Senator to Fill Out Term". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 10, 1936. p. 1.
  12. ^ "Pro-Italian Mob Fights Police in Paris University". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 12, 1936. p. 2.
  13. ^ "North America Freezes in Another Cold Wave". The Argus. Melbourne: 9. February 14, 1936.
  14. ^ "League Experts Decide Oil Ban Depends on U.S.". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 13, 1936. p. 11.
  15. ^ Pearce, Jeff (2014). Prevail: The Inspiring Story of Ethiopia's Victory over Mussolini's Invasion, 1935–1941. Skyhorse Publishing. ISBN 978-1-63220-096-9.
  16. ^ "British Ambulance Bombed". The Advertiser. Adelaide: 23. March 6, 1936.
  17. ^ "Panic of 300 on Stairway is Blamed for 5 Deaths, 37 Injuries in Cafe Fire". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 13, 1936. p. 1.
  18. ^ Judt, Tony (1998). The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century. University of Chicago Press. p. 78. ISBN 978-0-226-41419-5.
  19. ^ Taylor, Edmond (February 14, 1936). "Paris Disbands Royalist Units to End Violence". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  20. ^ "5 Venezuelans Killed in Riot Over Press Gag". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 15, 1936. p. 12.
  21. ^ Day, Donald (February 16, 1936). "Poland's Rabbis Threaten to Tie Up Meat Trade". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 19.
  22. ^ "League Moves into 10 Million Palace Today". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 17, 1936. p. 4.
  23. ^ "Chronology 1936". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved August 16, 2015.
  24. ^ "Nazi Organization Is Banned by Swiss After Reich Protest". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 18, 1936. p. 1.
  25. ^ Cortada, James W., ed. (1982). Historical Dictionary of the Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. p. 495. ISBN 0-313-22054-9.
  26. ^ Taylor, Edmond (February 21, 1936). "Red Mob Rule Imperils Spain; Fight Rioters". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  27. ^ "Spanish Reds Fire Churches". Brooklyn Daily Eagle: 1. February 20, 1936.
  28. ^ Taylor, Edmond (February 22, 1936). "Spain Opens Jails to 34,000". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  29. ^ "Old Pitcher to See How Far a Dollar Will Go". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 19, 1936. p. 1.
  30. ^ "Dollar Thrown Across River by Johnson". Chicago Daily Tribune: 1. February 23, 1936.
  31. ^ "Germany Establishes Quoto for Number of Jewish Doctors". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 23, 1936. p. 3.
  32. ^ "Porto Rico Chief of Police Slain; Vet of U.S. Army". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 24, 1936. p. 2.
  33. ^ Scarano, Francisco A. (2000). Puerto Rico Cinco Siglos de Historia (in Spanish) (2nd ed.). McGrawHill Interamericana Edit. pp. 793–799. ISBN 970-10-2911-9.
  34. ^ "Tin Pan Alley's Famous Appear to Fight a Bill". Chicago Daily Tribune. February 26, 1936. p. 1.
  35. ^ Taylor, Edmond (February 28, 1936). "Paris Chamber Accepts Russia as Ally in War". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  36. ^ "Rail Fare Cut To 2c. a Mile For All of U.S.". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 28, 1936. p. 1.
  37. ^ "President Puts O. K. on Revised Neutrality Law". Chicago Daily Tribune. March 1, 1936. p. 4.