Federal Correctional Institution, Allenwood

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Federal Correctional Institution, Allenwood Low
FCI Allenwood Low.jpg
Location Brady Township, Lycoming County,
near Montgomery, Pennsylvania
Status Operational
Security class Low-security
Population 1,450
Managed by Federal Bureau of Prisons

The Federal Correctional Institution (FCI), Allenwood Low is a low-security United States federal prison for male inmates in Pennsylvania. It is part of the Allenwood Federal Correctional Complex (FCC Allenwood) and is operated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, a division of the United States Department of Justice.[1]

The complex consists of two facilities:

  • Federal Correctional Institution, Allenwood Low (FCI Allenwood Low): a low-security facility.
  • Federal Correctional Institution, Allenwood Medium (FCI Allenwood Medium): a medium-security facility.

FCC Allenwood is located 75 miles north of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, the state capital just west of US Route 15.

Notable incidents[edit]

In February 2013, Fred Hagenbuch, 52, a former correction officer at the United States Penitentiary, Lewisburg, a high-security prison also located in Pennsylvania, pleaded guilty to a charge of theft of government property for stealing items from FCC Allenwood. The stolen property included electrical conduit, fence post, and mesh fencing valued at approximately $1,545.[2]

Notable inmates (current and former)[edit]

†The Sentencing Reform Act of 1984 eliminated parole for federal inmates. However, inmates sentenced for offenses committed prior to 1987 are eligible for parole consideration.[3]

Inmate Name Register Number Photo Status Details
Ronald Pelton 22914-037 Ronald Pelton.jpg Released from custody in 2015; served 30 years.†[4] Former NSA employee; convicted in 1985 of espionage for turning over classified defense material to the Soviet Union from 1980 to 1985, including information regarding the highly classified Operation Ivy Bells.[5][6]
Kifah Jayyousi 39551-039 Serving a 12-year sentence; scheduled for release in 2017.[7] Co-defendant of Jose Padilla; convicted in 2007 of murder conspiracy and providing material support for terrorism for sending money, equipment, and recruits to support jihad overseas.[8][9]
James Cromitie 70658-054 Serving a 25-year sentence; scheduled for release in 2031.[10] Convicted in 2010 of attempted use of weapons of mass destruction and attempted murder for masterminding a plot to bomb synagogues and shoot down planes at Stewart International Airport in New York; three co-conspirators are also in prison.[11][12][13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "FCI Allenwood Low". Federal Bureau of Prisons. 
  2. ^ "FORMER U.S. CORRECTIONS OFFICER PLEADS GUILTY TO THEFT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY" (PDF). US Department of Justice. February 21, 2013. Retrieved 21 October 2013. 
  3. ^ "History of The Federal Parole System". US Department of Justice. 
  4. ^ Flynn, Dan (October 2, 2015). "Stewart Parnell Could Be Sent to 'Crown Jewel' of the Federal Prison System". Food Safety News. Seattle. Retrieved October 4, 2015. 
  5. ^ "Ronald William Pelton". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 21 October 2013. 
  6. ^ Curry, George (June 6, 1986). "Ex-intelligence Expert Guilty Of Espionage". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 19 January 2014. 
  7. ^ "CIVIL ACTION NO.10-cv-539" (PDF). ccrjustice.org. Center for Constitutional Rights. September 5, 2012. Retrieved 4 October 2015. 
  8. ^ "#07-624: 08-16-07 Jose Padilla and Co-Defendants Convicted of Conspire to Murder Individuals Overseas, Providing Material Support to Terrorists". Justice.gov. Retrieved 2014-03-15. 
  9. ^ "Kifah Wael Jayyousi". Historycommons.org. Retrieved 2014-03-15. 
  10. ^ Calhoun III, Clinton W. (January 30, 2012). "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA V. JAMES CROMITIE ET AL." (PDF). projectsalam.org. Retrieved 4 October 2015. 
  11. ^ "FOUR MEN FOUND GUILTY IN MANHATTAN FEDERAL COURT OF PLOTTING TO BOMB SYNAGOGUE AND JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER AND TO SHOOT MILITARY PLANES WITH STINGER MISSILES" (PDF). US Department of Justice. Retrieved 16 March 2013. 
  12. ^ Fahim, Kareem (October 18, 2010). "4 Convicted of Attempting to Blow Up 2 Synagogues". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 March 2013. 
  13. ^ Weiser, Benjamin (June 29, 2011). "Men Draw 25-Year Terms In Synagogue Bomb Plot". The New York Times. Retrieved 16 March 2013. 

Coordinates: 41°9′49″N 76°55′23″W / 41.16361°N 76.92306°W / 41.16361; -76.92306