Federal Correctional Institution, Greenville

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Federal Correctional Institution, Greenville
FCI GRE lrg 2013.jpg
Location Greenville, Illinois
Status Operational
Security class Medium-security (with minimum-security prison camp)
Capacity 1,180 (320 in prison camp)
Managed by Federal Bureau of Prisons
Warden Tom Werlich

The Federal Correctional Institution (FCI Greenville) is a medium-security United States federal prison for male offenders in Illinois, with an adjacent satellite prison camp for minimum-security female offenders. It is operated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, a division of the United States Department of Justice.

FCI Greenville is located approximately 43 miles east of St. Louis, Missouri, and 63 miles from Springfield, Illinois.[1]

History[edit]

The prison camp was turned into a women's facility in 2000 in order to make more space for women in the north central U.S.[2]

Notable incidents[edit]

In 2001, David Mack, a central figure in the LAPD Rampart Scandal, was attacked by a group of fellow inmates while jogging in the prison recreation yard at FCI Greenville. The Bureau of Prisons and the FBI refused to confirm that the attack occurred, but Mack's attorney reported that the inmates were gang members who attacked Mack after they saw a television program and read press accounts that detailed Mack's role in stealing from gang members and his connection with fellow officer Rafael Perez, another central figure in the scandal. Mack was taken to a local hospital and was treated for multiple stab wounds and a punctured lung. He was released two days later and returned to the prison.[3]

Notable inmates (current and former)[edit]

Inmate name Register number Status Details
Terry M. Helvey 13867-045 Sentenced to Life by Court-marshal [4] Former Airman Apprentice who brutally murdered United States Navy Radioman Petty Officer Third Class Allen R. Schindler Jr. in a public toilet in Sasebo, Nagasaki in 1992 for being gay.[5] Helvey was transferred to the FCI from the United States Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth.
David Mack 12866-112 Released from custody in 2010; served 12 years.[6] Former LAPD officer involved in the Rampart Scandal; convicted in 1998 of masterminding the armed robbery of a Los Angeles bank in 1997 during which $722,000 was stolen; suspected of being involved in planning the 1997 murder of rapper Notorious B.I.G.[7]
Walter Bond 37096-013 Serving a 12-year sentence; scheduled for release in 2021. Member of the Animal Liberation Front; pleaded guilty in 2011 to arson in connection with 2010 fires at three businesses in Utah and Colorado; author of "Always Looking Forward," Liberation Press, 2011.[8]
Derrick Shareef 22344-424 Serving a 35-year sentence; scheduled for release in 2037.[9] US citizen and Al-Qaeda supporter; pleaded guilty in 2007 to the attempted use of weapons of mass destruction for plotting to detonate grenades at the Cherryvale Mall in Illinois during Christmas shopping season in 2006.[10][11]
Patrick Houston 17959-076 Released from custody in 2005; served 4 years.[12] Rapper known as Project Pat; charged in 2001 with violating his parole for aggravated robbery; convicted in 2001 of being a felon in possession of a firearm.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "FCI Greenville". Federal Bureau of Prisons. 
  2. ^ "FEDERAL PRISON CAMP TO BEGIN HOUSING FEMALE INMATES." Federal Bureau of Prisons. July 6, 2000. Retrieved on July 20, 2016.
  3. ^ Glover, Scott (February 7, 2001). "Ex-LAPD Officer Is Stabbed in Prison". Los Angeles Times. 
  4. ^ Joyner, Will (August 11, 1997), "Slain Sailor's Mother As a Profile in Courage", The New York Times, retrieved March 21, 2008 
  5. ^ Jameson, Sam (May 28, 1994), "U.S. Sailor Sentenced to Life Imprisonment in Murder", Los Angeles Times, retrieved March 21, 2008 
  6. ^ Dillow, William J. Rehder & Gordon (2004). Where the money is : true tales from the bank robbery capital of the world. New York: W.W. Norton. ISBN 039332575X. 
  7. ^ "Rampart Scandal". Pbs.org. Retrieved 2015-10-27. 
  8. ^ "Walter »". Supportwalter.org. Retrieved 2014-03-15. 
  9. ^ "USA Prisoner List" (PDF). the aseerun project. June 1, 2013. Retrieved 14 October 2015. 
  10. ^ Arena, Kelli. "Man arrested in mall attack plot, source says". cnn.com. 
  11. ^ Bradley, Ben. "Special Segment: The Making of a Terrorist". ABC. 
  12. ^ Jason Birchmeier. "Project Pat | Biography & History". AllMusic. Retrieved 2015-10-27. 
  13. ^ "About Project Pat". MTV. Viacom International Inc. Retrieved 18 November 2015. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 38°51′58″N 89°24′32″W / 38.86611°N 89.40889°W / 38.86611; -89.40889