Federal Correctional Institution, Morgantown

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Federal Correctional Institution, Morgantown Kennedy Center
FCI Morgantown.jpg
LocationMonongalia County,
near Morgantown, West Virginia
StatusOperational
Security classMinimum-security
Population915
Managed byFederal Bureau of Prisons

The Federal Correctional Institution, Morgantown Kennedy Center (FCI Morgantown) is a minimum-security United States federal prison for male inmates in West Virginia. It is operated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, a division of the United States Department of Justice. The facility has been nicknamed 'Club Fed' because of its amenities which include a large college-like campus, a movie theater, a bocce ball court and a basketball court as well as housing many white collar, nonviolent offenders.[1][2]

FCI Morgantown is located in the city of Morgantown in northern West Virginia and approximately 160 miles northeast of Charleston, the state capital.[3]

History[edit]

Senator Ted Kennedy dedicated the Robert F. Kennedy Youth Center in December 1968. The facility was designed to be the first of its kind to test a new method of detention employing an experimental "unit management" model that promoted a humane approach, grouping inmates into units of 50 to 200 overseen by multidisciplinary teams and specialized staff to tend to inmate needs including religious services, training, and counseling and rehabilitation. Less than a decade after opening, the facility transitioned from housing juvenile offenders to adult, male inmates. The name of the facility was later changed to 'Federal Correctional Institution, Morgantown Kennedy Center'[2]

Notable incidents[edit]

In August 2008, 50-year-old Randall Michael pleaded guilty to committing mail fraud while he was an inmate at FCI Morgantown. Michael masterminded a scheme to obtain money by falsely representing himself to potential investors as a wealthy executive who was attempting to obtain a grant requiring a refundable $50,000 bond with which he would purchase approximately 13 acres for $3.9 million for coal exploration. One individual subsequently mailed Michael a check for $26,250 addressed to the false bonding company, which Michael cashed and distributed to members of his own family. Michael was sentenced to an additional 24 months in prison on July 9, 2009.[4]

Notable inmates[edit]

Current[edit]

Inmate Name Register Number Status Details
R. Seth Williams 75926-066 Serving a 5-year sentence; scheduled for release in 2020. Former Philadelphia District Attorney; pleaded guilty to one count of bribery.[5]
Matthew Kluger 78142-083 Serving a 12-year sentence; scheduled for release in 2022. Disbarred attorney; pleaded guilty to insider trading in 2011 for stealing corporate merger tips from four law firms over a 17-year period, making $37 million in illegal profits; Kluger received the longest sentence for insider trading in US history.[6]
Happy Asker 48788-039 Serving a 50 month prison sentence. President and founder of Detroit-based Happy's Pizza, found guilty of 32 tax crimes and conspiracy to defraud the U.S. The jury took 4.5 hours to convict on 3 counts of filing of false returns for Happy's pizza franchises and one count of engaging in a corrupt endeavor to obstruct and impede the administration of the IRS
Eric Ian Spoutz 73078-112 Serving a 41 month sentence; scheduled for release May 2020. A former art dealer from Michigan; Eric pleaded guilty to selling forged art works from artists such as Picasso, de Kooning, Marc Chagall and Joan Mitchell. Eric was forced to forfeit the $1.45 million he made from the scheme and pay $154,100 in fines.[7]

Former[edit]

Inmate Name Register Number Status Details
Bob Ney 28882-016 Released from custody in 2008; served 11 months.[8] Ohio Congressman from 1995 to 2006; pleaded guilty in 2006 to conspiracy to commit honest services fraud and making false statements related to the Jack Abramoff Indian lobbying scandal.[9][10]
Richard Hatch 05559-070 Released from custody in 2009; served 3 years.[11] Contestant on the CBS television program Survivor in 2000; convicted of tax evasion in 2006 for failing to report income, including $1 million he won on the show and $321,000 he was paid by a Boston radio station.[12][13]
Kevin Dunn 75487-053 Released from custody in 2012; served 3 years.[14] Former MetLife Insurance broker; pleaded guilty in 2008 to stealing $250,000 from a settlement received by the widow of Port Authority Police Officer Christopher Amoroso, who was killed in the September 11th attacks; the story was featured on the CNBC television show American Greed.[15][16][17]
Patrick Cannon 29396-058 Released from custody in 2017; served 22 months.[18] Mayor of Charlotte, NC from December 2013 to March 2014; pleaded guilty in 2014 to honest services fraud for accepting $50,000 in bribes from undercover FBI agents posing as investors in exchange for using his official position to benefit them.[19][20]
Rick Renzi 29375-208 Released from custody in 2017; served 2 years. Arizona Congressman from 2003 to 2009; convicted in 2013 of extortion, bribery, insurance fraud, money laundering and racketeering for receiving $1.5 million from a land developer and committing insurance fraud to fund his campaign.[21]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ James F. McCarty, "West Virginia federal prison in the mountains houses Cuyahoga County's corruption convicts" The Plain Dealer, June 20, 2011
  2. ^ a b Pam Kasey, "This Is No Country Club; Morgantown’s federal prison pioneered today’s standard model of prison management. Some say the town and prison could pioneer again" WV Living Morgantown, Oct. 7, 2015
  3. ^ "FCI Morgantown". Federal Bureau of Prisons.
  4. ^ "Morgantown Resident Sentenced on Mail Fraud Charge". Federal Bureau of Prisons. Retrieved 15 March 2013.
  5. ^ "Philadelphia District Attorney Rufus Seth Williams Pleads Guilty To Federal Bribery Charge". www.justice.gov. Retrieved 30 June 2017.
  6. ^ "Lawyer Kluger Gets 12 Years, Bauer 9 for Insider Trades". Bloomberg.
  7. ^ "Art dealer who made $1.45 million selling fake paintings gets 3-year jail sentence". NBC News. Retrieved 2018-02-06.
  8. ^ Pergram, Chad (20 February 2008). "Former Rep. Bob Ney Released From Prison". Fox News. Retrieved 15 March 2013.
  9. ^ "Congressman Robert W. Ney Pleads Guilty to Charges". US Department of Justice. Retrieved 15 March 2013.
  10. ^ Associated Press (1 March 2007). "Former Rep. Bob Ney Reports to West Virginia Prison". Fox News. Retrieved 15 March 2013.
  11. ^ Associated Press (August 2, 2006). "'Survivor' Winner Richard Hatch Now in West Virginia Prison". Fox News. Retrieved 27 October 2013.
  12. ^ "'Survivor' Winner To Plead Guilty". CBS News. Retrieved 16 March 2013.
  13. ^ Associated Press. "'Survivor' Hatch gets 51 months in prison". NBC News. Retrieved 16 March 2013.
  14. ^ Gordon, Michael (November 7, 2014). "Morgantown prison will be new home for former Charlotte Mayor Patrick Cannon". The Charlotte Observer. Retrieved 9 September 2015.
  15. ^ Associated Press (4 June 2008). "Man Pleads Guilty to Swindling Sept. 11 Widow, New York Prosecutors Say". Fox News. Retrieved 16 March 2013.
  16. ^ Rosenblatt, Joel (3 June 2008). "Former MetLife Broker Pleads Guilty in 9-11 Theft". Bloomberg. Retrieved 16 March 2013.
  17. ^ Marzulli, John (January 13, 2009). "Judge sentences 'heartless' ex-MetLife broker to 51 months in prison for 9/11 widow swindle". New York Daily News. Retrieved 16 March 2013.
  18. ^ Gordon, Michael (November 18, 2014). "Former Charlotte Mayor Patrick Cannon enters West Virginia prison". The Charlotte Observer. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  19. ^ "Former Charlotte Mayor Patrick D. Cannon Sentenced to 44 Months in Prison". Federal Bureau of Investigation. October 14, 2014. Retrieved 29 December 2014.
  20. ^ Gordon, Michael (November 18, 2014). "Former Charlotte Mayor Patrick Cannon enters West Virginia prison". The McClatchy Company. Retrieved 29 December 2014.
  21. ^ "Former Arizona Congressman Rick Renzi convicted on 17 of 32 counts in corruption case". Washington Post. Retrieved 12 June 2013.[dead link]

Coordinates: 39°36′06″N 79°56′58″W / 39.60167°N 79.94944°W / 39.60167; -79.94944