Felicia D. Henderson

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Felicia D. Henderson
Born
Felicia D. Henderson

(1961-04-18) April 18, 1961 (age 58)
ResidencePasadena, California
EducationMaster of Fine Arts
Alma materUniversity of California, Los Angeles
OccupationFilm and Television producer, director, and writer
Years active1994–present

Felicia D. Henderson (born April 18, 1961) is an American television producer, screenwriter, comic books writer and a director of music videos and television episodes. She has worked on Moesha, Sister, Sister, Soul Food, and Fringe, also played in a movie with Whitney Houston.

Personal life[edit]

Henderson was born on April 18, 1961. She grew up in Pasadena, California, where she currently resides. She is one of eight siblings, including a brother who works as a reality show editor.[1] Henderson currently resides in Pasadena, California. She has always had a love for writing and describes herself as a "researchaholic." After graduating from the University of California, Los Angeles with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psycho-Biology, she spent five years in business, and later attended the University of Georgia where she obtained an MBA in corporate finance and non-profit management. She also holds an MFA from UCLA and is a PhD Candidate in Media Studies, also at UCLA.[1]

She is also a Diamond Life member of Delta Sigma Theta sorority, the Writers Guild of America, the Directors Guild of America, and the Television Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Career[edit]

After working as a creative associate at NBC, Henderson realized she wanted to become a writer, and soon became an apprentice on the sitcom Family Matters, and on The Fresh Prince of Bel Air two years later. She co-produced Moesha and Sister, Sister, and developed the TV series Soul Food for television.[2] It became the longest running drama in television history to star a black cast, and earned several NAACP Image Awards.[1]

She graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles in 2004 with a Master of Fine Arts degree. She and three of her friends, Mara Brock Akil, Gina Prince-Bythewood, and Sara Finney-Johnson endowed the Four Sisters Scholarship in Screenwriting, Directing, and Animation to support students interested in projects depicting the African American experience.[1][3] She is currently a PhD candidate in the school's Cinema and Media Studies program.[1]

Henderson worked as a co-executive producer for the teen drama series Gossip Girl.[1] She also served as a co-executive producer on the first season of the science-fiction television series Fringe, before leaving to begin as a writer on the DC Comics series Teen Titans, Static Shock, as well as other projects.[4]

Her recent television drama credits include "Marvel's The Punisher" and "The Quad."

Filmography[edit]

  • Family Matters, writer and story editor (1994-1996)
  • The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, writer (1995)
  • Moesha, writer and co-producer (1996-1997)
  • Sister, Sister, writer, co-executive producer, and supervising producer (1997-1998)
  • Movie Stars, writer and consulting producer (2000)
  • Soul Food, creator, writer, director and executive producer (2000-2003)
  • Everybody Hates Chris, writer and consulting producer (2006)
  • Gossip Girl, writer and co-executive producer (2007-2008)
  • Fringe, writer and co-executive producer (2008-2009)
  • Reed Between the Lines, writer and executive producer (2012-2013)
  • The Quad, co-creator, executive producer (2016-2018)
  • Marvel's The Punisher, writer and co-executive producer (2017-2018)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Felicia Henderson Biography". University of California, Los Angeles. 2009-05-05. Archived from the original on 2011-01-23. Retrieved 2011-04-11.
  2. ^ Mayer, Vicki; Miranda J. Banks; John Thornton Caldwell (2009). Production studies: cultural studies of media industries. New York: Routledge. ISBN 0-415-99795-X.
  3. ^ Franco, Ariela (2005-08-04). "'Four Sisters' Endow New UCLA Scholarship for Film and Television Students to Portray the African American Experience". University of California, Los Angeles. Retrieved 2011-04-11.
  4. ^ Renaud, Jeffrey (2009-07-21). "Talking Teen Titans with Felicia D. Henderson". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved 2011-04-11.

[1]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Bryan Q. Miller
Teen Titans writer
2009
Succeeded by
J.T. Krul
Preceded by
J.T. Krul
Teen Titans writer
2009
Succeeded by
J.T. Krul
  1. ^ "Felicia D. Henderson". UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television. Retrieved 5 April 2017.