Ferdinand of Majorca

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Ferdinand of Majorca
Born 1278
Perpignan
Died Between 5 July and 19 October 1316
Glarentza
Spouse Isabella of Sabran
Issue James III of Majorca
Ferdinand
House Barcelona
Father James II of Majorca
Mother Esclaramunda of Foix
A denarius minted by Ferdinand during his brief rule in Achaea

Ferdinand of Majorca (Catalan: Ferran de Mallorca; 1278, Perpignan – 5 July 1316, Glarentza) was an infante of the Kingdom of Majorca as the third son of King James II. He was Viscount of Aumelas and Lord of Frontignan from 1311 and Prince of Achaea and Morea[1] from 1315.

He was sent by Frederick III of Sicily to take command of the Catalan Company in Frederick's name, but was rebuffed by Bernat de Rocafort, one of their leaders. On his return with the chronicler Ramón Muntaner, he was captured by the Venetians at Negroponte. He had been released by 1310, when he distinguished himself at the siege of Almería by killing the son of the King of Guadix.

In 1313, he returned to Sicily to take part in the war then in hand with the Angevins and was created Lord of Catania. Margaret of Villehardouin was then in Sicily, seeking to advance her claim to the Principality of Achaea. She gave her daughter Isabella of Sabran to Ferdinand in marriage and resigned Akova and her claim on Achaea to the couple, who were married in Messina. Margaret died in March 1315 in captivity in Chlemoutsi, and her daughter on 7 May 1315 in Catania, shortly after bearing a son, James III of Majorca.

Shortly after her death, Ferdinand set out with a small company for the Morea to uphold the claim now held by his son. He seized Clarenza in June 1315 and briefly took control of the Morea. In the autumn of 1315 he took a second wife, Isabella of Ibelin, daughter of the Seneschal of Cyprus. However, his rival claimant Matilda of Hainaut, and her husband Louis of Burgundy returned to the Morea in the spring of 1316 with Venetian aid. Ferdinand's expected aid from Majorca and Sicily was tardy, as was that of the Catalan Company from Athens. Facing superior numbers, he was killed at the Battle of Manolada on July 5, 1316. He was succeeded as heir presumptive of Majorca by his elder son, the future King James III, and as Viscount of Aumelas by his posthumous son, Ferdinand.

References[edit]

  1. ^ His title was disputed by Louis of Burgundy, who is in the list of princes.