Ficus thonningii

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Ficus thonningii
Mulemba.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Rosales
Family: Moraceae
Genus: Ficus
Species: F. thonningii
Binomial name
Ficus thonningii
Blume
Synonyms

Ficus burkei
Ficus microcarpa Vahl. (non Wagner: preoccupied[verification needed])
Ficus petersii

Ficus thonningii is a species of Ficus. It is native to Africa. Recent phylogenetic analysis suggests several distinct species may be classified as F. thonningii.

The species has diverse economic and environmental uses across many faming and pastoral communities in Africa.[1] In some dryland areas in Africa for example, it is a very good source of dry season livestock fodder, because it produces highly nutritious foliage[2] in large amouns[3] all year round. Parts of the plant edible for livestock include, leaves, twigs and barks, and their nutirional value varies with season[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Balehegn, Mulubrhan; Eik, Lars O.; Tesfay, Yayneshet (2015-07-03). "Silvopastoral system based on Ficus thonningii: an adaptation to climate change in northern Ethiopia". African Journal of Range & Forage Science. 32 (3): 183–191. doi:10.2989/10220119.2014.942368. ISSN 1022-0119. 
  2. ^ Balehegn, Mulubrhan; Eik, Lars Olav; Tesfay, Yayneshet (2014-04-09). "Replacing commercial concentrate by Ficus thonningii improved productivity of goats in Ethiopia". Tropical Animal Health and Production. 46 (5): 889–894. doi:10.1007/s11250-014-0582-9. ISSN 0049-4747. 
  3. ^ Balehegn, Mulubrhan; Eniang, E. A.; Hassen, Abubeker (2012-04-01). "Estimation of browse biomass of Ficus thonningii, an indigenous multipurpose fodder tree in northern Ethiopia". African Journal of Range & Forage Science. 29 (1): 25–30. doi:10.2989/10220119.2012.687071. ISSN 1022-0119. 
  4. ^ "Effect of maturity on chemical composition of edible parts of Ficus thonningii Blume (Moraceae): an indigenous multipurpose fodder tree in Ethiopia". www.lrrd.org. Retrieved 2016-06-04. 

External links[edit]