Field's metal

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Field's metal, also known as Field's alloy, is a fusible alloy that becomes liquid at approximately 62 °C (144 °F).[1] It is named after its inventor, Simon Quellen Field.[2] It is a eutectic alloy of bismuth, indium, and tin, with the following percentages by weight: 32.5% Bi, 51% In, 16.5% Sn.[3]

When prepared, Field's metal can be melted in hot water. Field's metal is costly because its major component indium is expensive, priced at around double the price of silver.[4] Because it includes neither lead nor cadmium, it is much less toxic than Wood's metal. It can be used for small run die casting and rapid prototyping.[5]

This alloy has been investigated as a possible liquid metal coolant in advanced nuclear power system designs.[6] Field's metal is also of interest to nanotechnology researchers.[7][8]

Although it is much less dangerous to use than other commonly melted metals, such as lead or aluminium, contact with Field's metal in the liquid state can still cause third-degree burns.

Similar alloys[edit]

Alloy Melting point Eutectic? Bismuth Lead Tin Indium Cadmium Thallium Gallium Antimony
Rose's metal 98 °C (208 °F) no 50% 25% 25%
Cerrosafe 74 °C (165 °F) no 42.5% 37.7% 11.3% 8.5%
Wood's metal 70 °C (158 °F) yes 50% 26.7% 13.3% 10%
Field's metal 62 °C (144 °F) yes 32.5% 16.5% 51%
Cerrolow 136 58 °C (136 °F) yes 49% 18% 12% 21%
Cerrolow 117 47.2 °C (117 °F) yes 44.7% 22.6% 8.3% 19.1% 5.3%
Bi-Pb-Sn-Cd-In-Tl 41.5 °C (107 °F) yes 40.3% 22.2% 10.7% 17.7% 8.1% 1.1%
Galinstan −19 °C (−2 °F) yes <1.5% 9.5-10.5% 21-22% 68-69% <1.5%

References[edit]

  1. ^ Acton, Q.A. (2013). Heavy Metals—Advances in Research and Application: 2013 Edition. Scholarly Editions. p. 378. ISBN 978-1-4816-7634-2. Retrieved December 23, 2018.
  2. ^ "Desktop Foundry". Make. Retrieved 23 December 2018.
  3. ^ Scherer, M.R.J. (2013). Double-Gyroid-Structured Functional Materials: Synthesis and Applications. Springer Theses. Springer International Publishing. p. 182. ISBN 978-3-319-00354-2. Retrieved December 23, 2018.
  4. ^ Field, S.Q. (2003). Gonzo Gizmos: Projects and Devices to Channel Your Inner Geek. Chicago Review Press. p. 165. ISBN 978-1-56976-678-1. Retrieved December 23, 2018.
  5. ^ "FIELD'S Metal, 144 F, 62 C Low Melting Alloy". Belmont Metals. Retrieved December 22, 2018. Field’s metal is expensive due to the price of indium, which makes up over half its mass. However, as it contains neither lead nor cadmium, it is a less toxic alternative to Wood’s metal. It is used for die casting and rapid prototyping.
  6. ^ Lipschitz, A.; Harvel, G.; Sunagawa, T. (May 2015). "Experimental Investigation of the Thermal Conductivity and Viscosity of Liquid in Bi-SN Eutectic Alloy Field Metal for use in a Natural Circulation Experimental Loop". 23rd International Conference on Nuclear Engineering, At Chiba, Japan. Retrieved December 22, 2018.
  7. ^ Rudolf, Maik; Scherer, Johann (2013). Double-Gyroid-Structured Functional Materials: Synthesis and Applications. Springer Science+Business Media. p. 182. ISBN 9783319003542.
  8. ^ Lin, Zhiqun; Wang, Jun (2014). Low-cost Nanomaterials: Toward Greener and More Efficient Energy Applications. Springer Science+Business Media. p. 471. ISBN 9781447164739.