Fifeville and Tonsler Neighborhoods Historic District

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Fifeville and Tonsler Neighborhood Historic District
Fifth near Oak and Dice, Charlottesville.jpg
Fifth Street south of Dice Street
Fifeville and Tonsler Neighborhoods Historic District is located in Virginia
Fifeville and Tonsler Neighborhoods Historic District
Fifeville and Tonsler Neighborhoods Historic District is located in the United States
Fifeville and Tonsler Neighborhoods Historic District
LocationBounded by Cherry Ave, to the S., the railway to the N., 4th St., SW to the E., and Spring St., to the W., Charlottesville, Virginia
Coordinates38°1′46″N 78°29′35″W / 38.02944°N 78.49306°W / 38.02944; -78.49306Coordinates: 38°1′46″N 78°29′35″W / 38.02944°N 78.49306°W / 38.02944; -78.49306
Area56 acres (23 ha)
Built1822 (1822)
Built byHawkins, Coles, Shelton, Watson, Updike; J. Nalls; James Dinsmore
Architectural styleEarly Republic, Gothic Revival, Bungalow Craftsman
NRHP reference No.09000452[1]
VLR No.104-0213
Significant dates
Added to NRHPJune 18, 2009
Designated VLRMarch 20, 2008[2]

Fifeville and Tonsler Neighborhood Historic District is a national historic district located at Charlottesville, Virginia. The district encompasses 264 contributing buildings and 3 contributing sites in a predominantly African-American residential section of the city of Charlottesville. It was developed between 1890 and the 1930s and includes examples of the Bungalow and Gothic Revival styles. The oldest is dated to 1822. Located in the district are the separately listed Oak Lawn, Benjamin Tonsler House, Delevan Baptist Church, and Gardner-Mays Cottage.[3]

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2009.[1]

Events[edit]

A cross was burned in this neighborhood, at Cherry Avenue and Apple Street, near Ridge Street, on 15 August 1950.[4][5] Three white men left the scene before they could be identified.[4] The cross was made of burlap bags and boards.[4] It was small at only 2 and a half feet high.[5] Police made a routine investigation, but assistant Police Chief James E. Adams claimed that they could not determine the identity of the men or the reason for the cross burning.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. ^ "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 5 June 2013.
  3. ^ Maral S. Kalbian and Margaret T. Peters (October 2008). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Fifeville and Tonsler Neighborhood Historic District" (PDF). Virginia Department of Historic Resources. and Accompanying four photos and Accompanying map Archived August 13, 2013, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ a b c d "Charlottesville Citizens Shocked by Burning Cross in Negro Area Tuesday Night". Charlottesville Tribune. 18 August 1950.
  5. ^ a b "Cross-Burning Here Draws Investigation". Daily Progress. Charlottesville, VA. 16 Aug 1950.