Fifth Generation Systems

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Fifth Generation Systems
IndustryComputers
FateAcquired by Symantec
FoundedOctober 1984; 34 years ago (1984-10) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States
DefunctOctober 4, 1993 (1993-10-04)
HeadquartersBaton Rouge, Louisiana, United States
ParentSymantec

Fifth Generation Systems was a computer security company founded October 1984 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States by Bob Mitchell, Leroy Mitchell, Roger Ivey, and Bruce Ray. All four later left the company. Fifth Generation's initial commercial product was FastBack, the first practical hard disk backup program for the IBM PC.

Software by Fifth Generation Systems includes:

  • CopyDoubler (Mac) – system utility for speeding up file copies and managing file copy queues
  • DiskDoubler (Mac) – on-the-fly hard drive compression software
  • DiskLock (Mac) – security software incorporating access control and encryption[1]
  • FastBack (PC, Mac) – hard disk backup utility
  • Public Utilities (Mac) – software with disk optimization, repair, and data recovery functions, developed by Sentient Software[2][3]
  • Pyro! (Mac) – screensaver that displayed fireworks among other user-selectable displays[4]
  • Search&Destroy (PC) – online and offline virus scanner for DOS and Windows, included in Novell DOS 7
  • Suitcase (Mac) – font management utility
  • Super Laser Spool and Super Spool (Mac) – print spoolers, acquired from Supermac Technology in 1990[5]
  • Direct Access – a menu system software for DOS.

The company was acquired by Symantec on October 4, 1993 for US$53.8 million.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schneier, Bruce (February 1993). "Data Guardians". Macworld. Retrieved 2016-08-15.
  2. ^ Angus, Jeff (1993-02-08). "Public Utilities decreases data brownouts". InfoWorld. Vol. 15 no. 6. IDG. p. 77. Retrieved 2017-09-08.
  3. ^ Schneier, Bruce (1993-06-21). "Emergency Recovery Tools: Raising Data from the Dead". MacWEEK. Retrieved 2017-09-08.
  4. ^ Lewis, Peter H. (1989-04-02). "THE EXECUTIVE COMPUTER; How to Extend a Monitor's Life". New York Times. Retrieved 2016-08-15.
  5. ^ "SUPERMAC SELLS SPOOLER SOFTWARE". InfoWorld. Vol. 12 no. 31. 1990-07-30. p. 34. Retrieved 2016-11-26.
  6. ^ "Symantec, Form 10-Q, Quarterly Report, Filing Date Feb 13, 1995". secdatabase.com. Retrieved May 14, 2018.