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File:Clepsydra-Diagram-Fancy.jpeg

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Clepsydra-Diagram-Fancy.jpeg(375 × 600 pixels, file size: 57 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)

Summary

Description Diagram of a fancy clepsydra, this type being an automaton or self-adjusting machine. Water enters and raises the figure, which points at the current hour for the day. Spillover water operates a series of gears that rotates a cylinder so that hour lengths are appropriate for today's date. The ancient Greeks and Romans had twelve hours from sunrise to sunset; since summer days are longer than winter days, summer hours were longer than winter hours.
Date
Source Abraham Rees () "Clepsydra" in Cyclopædia: or, a New Universal Dictionary of Arts and Sciences The image is the JPEG reproduction published 2007-02-01 by the Horological Foundation.
Author The illustrator was probably w:John Farey, Jr. (1791–1851). The principal engraver for the encyclopedia was Wilson Lowry (1762–1824).[1]
Other versions Image:Clepsydra-Diagram-Fancy.png

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References

  1. Frances Robertson (2005-01). "The aesthetics of authenticity: printed banknotes as industrial currency". Technology and Culture 46 (1): 31-50.

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Date/TimeThumbnailDimensionsUserComment
current18:55, 8 January 2014Thumbnail for version as of 18:55, 8 January 2014375 × 600 (57 KB)HohumCleanup
07:32, 30 April 2007Thumbnail for version as of 07:32, 30 April 2007375 × 600 (41 KB)Eubulides{{Information |Description= |Source= |Date= |Author= }}
05:06, 30 April 2007Thumbnail for version as of 05:06, 30 April 2007296 × 558 (27 KB)Eubulides{{Information |Description=Diagram of a fancy clepsydra. Water enters and raises the figure, which points at the current hour for the day. Spillover water operates a series of gears that rotates a cylinder so that hour lengths are appropriate for today's
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