Filipinos in Singapore

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Filipinos in Singapore
Total population
175,000 (2013)[1] (pop)
Tagalog, other Philippine languages, English
Roman Catholicism · Protestantism · Islam
Related ethnic groups
Filipino people, Overseas Filipinos

Filipinos in Singapore consists of citizens from the Philippines residing in Singapore, and sometimes, it is also used to refer to Singaporean citizens born in the Philippines or with Filipino ancestors.


Lucky Plaza mall in Orchard Road host products and services that are catered for the Filipino migrants in Singapore.

In 2004 most Filipinos in Singapore were domestic workers.[2] By 2009, there were 163,090 citizens of the Philippines living in Singapore.[1] Between 2010 and 2012, about 45,450 Filipinos were newly hired into Singapore.[1]

The number of Singaporean citizens of Filipino origin is difficult to determine, since they are officially counted as members of the "Others" race by the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority.[3]

As of 2007, an estimated 80,000 work as domestic helpers, with another 12,000 in the information technology industry.[4] This marks a slight rise from 1995, when roughly 75,000 domestic helpers from the Philippines were estimated to be working in Singapore.[5] In recent years they have seen professional diversification, with others working as nurses, bank clerks, sales assistants in department stores, or entertainers.[6][7] However, of those, only 27,000 were registered to vote in Filipino elections.[8]

The number of Filipino victims of human trafficking jumped by 70% in 2007 to 212 cases.[9] By 2014, over 170,000 Filipinos resided in Singapore. Many worked in professional positions and Singaporeans perceived them as competitors for employment.[10] That year, a Google Blogger account appeared, giving suggestions on how to harass Filipinos in Singapore. This account was deleted by Google.[2]

Aside from residents, roughly 460,000 Filipino tourists came to Singapore in 2008.[7]


Philippines Independence Day 2014 incident[edit]

In May 2014, plans to hold celebrations for the Philippines Independence Day were cancelled due to online criticism of holding it in Orchard Road, Singapore's main shopping district.[10][11][12]

Tan Tock Seng nurse incident/Edz Ello incident[edit]

In January 2015, Ello Ed Mundsel Bello (also known as Edz Ello), a Filipino nurse working for Tan Tock Seng Hospital was sacked. He was then charged for posting anti-Singaporean remarks on his social media accounts in April in the same year.

His comments immediately went viral, leading to "netizens" lodging police reports against him. Right after his comments went viral, his employer Tan Tock Seng Hospital, conducted internal investigations. He was also required to assist in police investigations. However, he only admitted to posting some of the offensive comments to both the hospital investigation team and the police force, he then claimed that his social media accounts were "hacked", with the "hackers" posting the offensive comments using his social media accounts.

Police investigations showed that all the comments were made by Edz Ello, and his account wasn't hacked as what he had told the police previously. Netizens also proved that this was not the first time that he had made such a post before this incident.

On April 7, 2015, Ello Ed Mundsel Bello was arrested and charged for 3 counts of subsequently lying to the police, and 2 counts of publishing seditious statements.[13][14] This resulted in an online petition on Facebook to deport the nurse.[15]

See also[edit]


  1. ^ a b c OFW Statistics, Philippines: Philippine Overseas Employment Administration, 8 February 2013, retrieved 2014-04-28 
  2. ^ a b "Google removes Singapore hate blog against Filipinos" (Archive). Agence France Presse. June 20, 2014. Retrieved on June 22, 2014.
  3. ^ Response To "What About Malay Migrants", Singapore: Immigration and Checkpoints Authority, retrieved 2014-04-28 
  4. ^ "Background of Singapore and Profile of Singaporean President S.R. Nathan", News (Philippines: Office of the Press Secretary), 2007, retrieved 2008-04-11 
  5. ^ Shenon, Philip (1995-03-19), "Ramos calls the Filipino Maid Executed in Singapore a Heroine", The New York Times, retrieved 2009-07-27 
  6. ^ Certeza, Dodo (2008-11-18), "The changing face of Filipinos in Singapore", The Philippine Star, retrieved 2009-07-27 
  7. ^ a b Bauzon, Bernice Camille V. (2009-01-16), "OFW jobs in Singapore not in peril", The Manila Times, retrieved 2007-07-27 
  8. ^ "Filipinos in Singapore to test online voting", The Age (Australia), 2007-02-22, retrieved 2008-04-11 
  9. ^ Caber, Michael (2008-02-05), "Trafficking in Filipinos worsens in Singapore", Manila Standard Today, retrieved 2008-04-11 
  10. ^ a b "Unease in Singapore over Filipino workers". BBC News. 29 December 2014. 
  11. ^ "Filipino group cancels plans to hold Independence Day celebration". The Straits Times. May 27, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Filipino Group Awakens Anti-Foreign Anger in Singapore". The Wall Street Journal. April 22, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Filipino nurse sacked for anti-Singapore comments". PhilStar. January 12, 2015. 
  14. ^ "Philippine embassy reminds Tan Tock Seng nurse to watch his social media usage". The Straits Times. Jan 6, 2015. 
  15. ^ "Why Filipino nurse had to be sacked". AsiaOne. Jan 13, 2015.