Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography

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The Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography (FCACP) is a coalition of credit card issuers and Internet services companies that seeks to eliminate commercial child pornography by taking action on the payment systems that are used to fund these illegal operations.

In 2006, the International Centre for Missing & Exploited Children (ICMEC), the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC), and a number of banks, credit card companies, and electronic and third party payment networks created the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography.[1][2][3][4] The Financial Coalition consists of 34 banks, payment companies, and internet services companies.[5][6][7]

Senator Richard C. Shelby (R-AL), Chairman of the U.S. Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee, was the catalyst in bringing these industry leaders together to address the problem.[citation needed]

Members of the Coalition include America Online, American Express Company, Authorize.net, Bank of America, Capital One, Chase, Citigroup, Discover Financial Services LLC, First Data Corporation, First National Bank of Omaha, Google, HSBC - NA, JP Morgan Chase, MasterCard, Microsoft, North American Bancard, Nova Information Systems, PayPal, First PREMIER Bank/PREMIER Bankcard, Standard Chartered Bank, Visa, Washington Mutual, Wells Fargo, and Yahoo! Inc.[citation needed]

This U.S.-based effort expanded regionally with the creation of the Asia Pacific Financial Coalition in August 2009. The Coalition's initial objective was to make people and companies aware of the issue of online child sexual abuse, and how its sale and distribution was being conducted across payment and technology platforms.[5][8] In 2013, the Asia Pacific FCACP/ICMEC published "Confronting New Challenges in the Fight Against Child Pornography: Best Practices to Help File Hosting and File Sharing Companies Fight the Distribution of Child Sexual Exploitation Content."[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reinhard Eher; Leam A. Craig; Michael H. Miner; Friedemann Pfäfflin (2011). International Perspectives on the Assessment and Treatment of Sexual Offenders: Theory, Practice and Research. John Wiley & Sons. p. 514. ISBN 1119996201.
  2. ^ EC-Council (2009). Computer Forensics: Investigating Network Intrusions and Cyber Crime. Cengage Learning. pp. 11–26, 11–31 to 11–33. ISBN 1435483529.
  3. ^ "Financial Coalition; Blocking payments to illegal child pornography websites". ECPAT Child Alert. Archived from the original on 2014-12-06.
  4. ^ William Eazel (March 22, 2006). "Internet industry unites against child pornography". SC Magazine.
  5. ^ a b "The Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography (FCACP)", International Telecommunication Union
  6. ^ "Leading Brazilian Bank Joins International Fight Against Child Pornography; Banco Bradesco is the First Institution in the Latin America Region to Join the Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography" Archived 2014-12-05 at the Wayback Machine, WLOX 13, November 12, 2008
  7. ^ "Financial Coalition Against Child Pornography". Master Card – Corporate Responsibility.
  8. ^ "Bindu Sharma". The International Center for Not-for-Profit Law.
  9. ^ "Confronting New Challenges in the Fight Against Child Pornography: Best Practices to Help File Hosting and File Sharing Companies Fight the Distribution of Child Sexual Exploitation Content" Archived 2014-09-11 at the Wayback Machine, ICMEC, September 2013

External links[edit]