Finvarra

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King Finvarra,[1] also called Finvara, Finn Bheara,[2] Finbeara[3] or Fionnbharr,[4] is the High King[5] of the Daoine Sidhe in Irish folklore. In some legends, he is also the King of the Dead.[6] Finvarra is a benevolent figure who ensures good harvests,[7] a master at chess,[8] strong horses, and great riches to those who will assist him. However, he also frequently kidnaps human women.[9]

According to the legend, he lives on Knockmaa,[10] a hill near Tuam, in County Galway with his queen Oona[11] (or Oonagh,[12] Una, Uonaidh, etc.) The Queen of the fae often considered him a great commander. There is a ruin on the hill marked on Ordnance Survey maps as "Finvarra's castle". It is mentioned in manuscripts stretching back many centuries.

This "dwindling" of the Tuatha Dé Danann (thought to be the gods of Irish mythology)[13] to the fairies of folklore represents an adaptation of earlier pagan traditions to the later Christianized Ireland. A similar transition can be seen in other myths around the world (such as the Elves of Norse mythology who begin as human-sized beings and transition to tiny forest dwellers in later European folklore).

Finvarra in popular culture and media[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Fey". www.esotericonline.net.
  2. ^ "A – F". Faeriepedia.
  3. ^ "Spirited Enterprise". Spirited Enterprise.
  4. ^ "Fairy Lore". efairies.com.
  5. ^ "The Sidhe Race". www.libraryireland.com.
  6. ^ Harrison, Linda. "Faery Mounds". www.faerypool.com.
  7. ^ "Ancient Gods & Goddesses". godfinder.org.
  8. ^ "Folklore Friday - Finvarra and Oonagh". dawnmariehamilton.blogspot.co.uk.
  9. ^ "Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms, and Superstitions of Ireland: Ethna the Bride". www.sacred-texts.com.
  10. ^ "Knockma Galway Knockma Hill Galway Queen Maeve Finvarra Ireland". corofin.galway-ireland.ie.
  11. ^ "Today's Goddess...not really a Goddess at all. - Jess Carlson". 21 September 2009.
  12. ^ "Protected Blog › Log in". journeyingtothegoddess.wordpress.com.
  13. ^ "Fairy Lore". efairies.com.
  14. ^ "Finvarra". www.facebook.com.
  15. ^ "Finvarra - Celtic & Oriental Folk". www.finvarramusic.com.
  16. ^ "Finvarra's Circus: Monica Sanz: 9781533669124: Amazon.com: Books". Amazon.com. Retrieved 2018-04-26.
  17. ^ results, search (30 June 2016). Crane, Katrina, ed. "Finvarra's Circus". Monica Sanz Books – via Amazon.
  18. ^ "Author Interview with Monica Sanz (Finvarra's Circus)". 27 June 2016.
  19. ^ "April - 2015 - GirlyGirlBookReviews". girlygirlbookreviews.com.
  20. ^ "Author Interview: Stella Coulson". 10 January 2014.
  21. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2017-11-09. Retrieved 2017-07-13.
  22. ^ "Whitby After Dark".
  23. ^ "Book Blast – Whitby After Dark #1". 25 April 2015.
  24. ^ "BOOK REVIEW: "Otherworld" by Stella Coulson". kellysmithreviews.blogspot.co.uk.
  25. ^ results, search (19 March 2016). "Whitby After Dark". lulu.com – via Amazon.
  26. ^ results, search (1 May 2006). "Chronicles of Faerie: The Hunter's Moon". Harry N. Abrams – via Amazon.
  27. ^ review, green man. "O.R. Melling's The Chronicles Of Faerie". thegreenmanreview.com.
  28. ^ "THE HUNTERS MOON by O.R. Melling - Kirkus Reviews".