Fiona Farrell

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Fiona Farrell, ONZM (born 1947) is a New Zealand poet, fiction writer and playwright. Her latest novel, Limestone, was published in April 2009.[1] The Broken Book, (essays and poetry) was published by Auckland University Press 2011.[2] She lives at Otanerito on Banks Peninsula.[3] She worked in Palmerston North for a while in the 70's.

Awards and honours[edit]

She has won several awards for short fiction, including the Bank of New Zealand Katherine Mansfield Memorial Award and the American Express Award.

  • 1983 Bruce Mason Playwriting Award[4]
  • 1990 The Perils of Pauline Smith' (1990) won the Mobil Award for Best Radio Drama
  • 1991-1992 Canterbury University Writer in Residence
  • 'Chook Chook' (1992) remains one of Playmarket’s most frequently requested scripts
  • 1993 The Skinny Louie Book (Penguin,1992) won the 1993 New Zealand Book Award for Fiction[5]
  • 1995 recipient of the Meridian Energy Katherine Mansfield Memorial Fellowship[6]
  • 2003, 2005 The Hopeful Traveller (Random House, 2002) and Book Book (Random House, 2004) were runners-up at the Montana New Zealand Book Awards in 2003 and 2005 respectively, and were also nominated for International IMPAC Dublin Literary Awards 2003 and 2005.[7]
  • 2006 inaugural Rathcoola Residency in Donoughmore, Ireland
  • 2007 Prime Minister's Awards for Literary Achievement[8] worth $60,000.[9]
  • 2008 The Pop-Up Book of Invasions (Auckland University Press, 2007) was runner-up in the poetry category at the 2008 Montana New Zealand Book Awards.[10]
  • 2009 Mr Allbones’ Ferrets (Random House, 2007) was nominated for the 2009 Dublin IMPAC Award
  • 2010 Finalist in the 2010 New Zealand Book Awards in the Fiction category for her novel, Limestone (Random House, 2009)[11]
  • 2011 Robert Burns Fellow[12]
  • 2012 Officer in the New Zealand Order of Merit for Services to Literature
  • 2013 Awarded the $100,000 Creative New Zealand Michael King Writer’s Fellowship to research and write twin books, one fiction and one non-fiction, inspired by her experiences of the Christchurch earthquakes
  • 2015 non-fiction book The Village at the End of the Empire: 100 Ways to Read a City was a finalist for the 2016 Ockham New Zealand Book Awards.
  • 2016 The Villa at the Edge of the Empire: One Hundred Ways to Read a City was a finalist for the Non-Fiction section of the 2016 Ockham New Zealand Book Awards.[13]

Bibliography[edit]

Novels:

  • The Skinny Louie Book (1992)
  • Six Clever Girls Who Became Famous Women (1996)
  • The Hopeful Traveller (2002)
  • Book Book (2004)
  • Mr Allbones' Ferrets (2007)
  • Limestone (2009)

Poetry:

  • Cutting Out (1987)
  • The Inhabited Initial (1999)
  • The Pop-Up Book of Invasions (2007)

Short Stories:

  • The Rock Garden (1989)
  • Light Readings (2001)

References[edit]

  1. ^ About Fiona Farrell
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ "Fiona Farrell". Auckland University Press. Retrieved 17 January 2015. 
  4. ^ Edmond, Murray (6 October 2014). "Plays and playwrights - Theatre into the 2000s". Te Ara - the Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 27 July 2016. 
  5. ^ "Past Winners | New Zealand Book Awards Trust". www.nzbookawards.nz. Retrieved 2016-07-27. 
  6. ^ "Katherine Mansfield - Menton Fellowship - List of Fellows". mansfieldfellowship.org. Retrieved 2016-07-27. 
  7. ^ "Past Winners | New Zealand Book Awards Trust". www.nzbookawards.nz. Retrieved 2016-07-27. 
  8. ^ "Previous winners". Creative New Zealand. Retrieved October 24, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Prime Minister's Awards for literary achievement". www.creativenz.govt.nz. Retrieved 2016-07-27. 
  10. ^ "Past Winners | New Zealand Book Awards Trust". www.nzbookawards.nz. Retrieved 2016-07-27. 
  11. ^ "Past Winners | New Zealand Book Awards Trust". www.nzbookawards.nz. Retrieved 2016-07-27. 
  12. ^ Zealand, Otago Fellows, University of Otago, New. "The Robert Burns Fellowship, Otago Fellows, University of Otago, New Zealand". www.otago.ac.nz. Retrieved 2016-07-27. 
  13. ^ "2016 Awards Shortlist | New Zealand Book Awards Trust". www.nzbookawards.nz. Retrieved 2016-07-27. 

External links[edit]