Fionnuala Sweeney

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Fionnuala Sweeney
Born Fionnuala Sweeney
1965 (age 50–51)
Belfast, Northern Ireland
Occupation Television presenter
Notable credit(s) CNN Newsroom and International Desk

Fionnuala Sweeney /fɪˈnlə/ (born 1965) is an Irish anchorwoman and reporter. She had been based at CNN's headquarters in Atlanta, Sweeney was anchoring CNN Newsroom as well as serving as the primary substitute at the International Desk. She is known around Europe as the host of Eurovision Song Contest 1993 from Millstreet, County Cork.

Early life and education[edit]

Sweeney was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland in 1965, where she lived until she was 12, when they moved to Dublin.[1] She graduated with a bachelor's degree in English and History and a Higher Diploma in Education at the University College Dublin.[2]

Career[edit]

Radio[edit]

Sweeney's career in broadcasting began as newscaster on Chris Cary's Energy Power 103 FM in 1986, a "Superpirate" in Dublin where she was a co-presenter on "Wake Up With Energy" along with Pat Courtenay and Bob Gallico.[3] Sweeney's on air name at Energy was "Lisa Moore".[4] In 1988 she left Energy to work as a newscaster at RTÉ 2FM.[5]

Television journalism[edit]

While working as a television journalist at RTÉ, Sweeney was the host of the 38th 1993 Eurovision Song Contest.[6] She then moved to CNN, where she worked as a producer and anchor at CNN International Headquarters in Atlanta, before becoming a full-time anchor and relocating to London (where she anchored World One).[5]

In 2002, she was named the anchor of Your World Today.[7] She also anchored World One, World News Europe and International Correspondents, before returning to Atlanta to host CNN Newsroom as well as serving as the primary substitute on The International Desk.[5][8][9]

Awards[edit]

In 2006, Sweeney anchored and reported from Haifa during the Israel-Hezbollah war, for which CNN received an Edward R. Murrow Award.[10][11] In 2012, she was part of the news team that won an Emmy in the Outstanding Live Coverage of a Current News Story – Long Form category at the 33rd Annual News and Documentary Emmy Awards for the 2011 broadcast CNN Breaking News: Revolution in Egypt – President Mubarak Steps Down.[12] The coverage also won the network a Peabody Award.[13][14] The same year she part of the team nominated for another Emmy in the same category for the 2011 broadcast CNN Breaking News: Libya Revolution – Rebels Enter Tripoli and Gadhafi Compound.[15]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fionnuala Sweeney Irish Roots | Irish American Museum of DC". Irishamericanmuseumdc.org. Archived from the original on 8 January 2014. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  2. ^ "CNN Programs – Anchors/Reporters – Fionnuala Sweeney". CNN. 13 April 1970. Archived from the original on 31 October 2013. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  3. ^ "irish pirates". irishpirates.com. Archived from the original on 13 July 2011. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  4. ^ "Fionnuala Sweeney". irishpirates.com. 13 February 2003. Archived from the original on 1 December 2010. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c Kenny, Dave (26 July 2013). "Why our girls are stars of the global small screen". Irish Examiner. Archived from the original on 8 January 2014. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  6. ^ "Facts & Figures | Eurovision Song Contest – Copenhagen 2014". Eurovision.tv. Archived from the original on 17 January 2010. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  7. ^ "CNN unveils 'Your World Today' – TV News". Digital Spy. 28 August 2002. Archived from the original on 8 January 2014. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  8. ^ "CNN International: 'World News Europe' with Fionnuala Sweeney (2009) başlangıç". YouTube. 26 July 2013. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  9. ^ "CNN International: 'International Correspondents' with Fionnuala Sweeney (2006)". YouTube. 4 April 2009. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  10. ^ "CNN.com – Transcripts". CNN. 6 August 2006. Archived from the original on 8 January 2014. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  11. ^ "CNN Programs – Anchors/Reporters – Fionnuala Sweeney". CNN. 13 April 1970. Archived from the original on 31 August 2011. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  12. ^ Yahr, Emily (2 October 2012). "PBS wins most News and Documentary Emmy Awards – The TV Column". The Washington Post. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  13. ^ "View Winner | George Foster Peabody Awards". Peabodyawards.com. Archived from the original on 8 January 2014. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  14. ^ "Peabody Awards 2012: CNN, Al Jazeera, NPR, Colbert Among Winners". Huffington Post. 4 April 2012. Archived from the original on 8 January 2014. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 
  15. ^ "Fionnuala Sweeney – Awards". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved 10 December 2013. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Sweden Harald Treutiger & Lydia Cappolicchio
Eurovision Song Contest presenter
1993
Succeeded by
Republic of Ireland Gerry Ryan & Cynthia Ní Mhurchú