First Amendment audits

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First Amendment Audits are part of an American social movement of activism claiming to test constitutional rights;[1] in particular the right of freedom of photography in a public space.[2][3] During some "audits", officers responded violently to photographers, resulting in unlawful detainments and, in one case, drawing a weapon at a photographer.[4][5][6] These events have prompted police officials to release information on the proper methods of handling such an activity.[7][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Photographers - What To Do If You Are Stopped Or Detained For Taking Photographs".
  2. ^ https://calro.org/first-amendment-audits/ First Amendment Audits and How to Respond
  3. ^ https://www.cirsa.org/news/first-amendment-audits-coming-to-your-town/ “FIRST AMENDMENT AUDITS” COMING TO YOUR TOWN?"
  4. ^ ""First Amendment auditor" claims sheriff deputy attacked him at Lebanon County courthouse - witf.org". www.witf.org.
  5. ^ WKBN (14 March 2018). "Viral video of Ohio police causes outrage, crashes phone line".
  6. ^ "Man Recording Police Files Complaint After Officer Draws Gun".
  7. ^ "First Amendment Audits and How to Respond • California Association of Labor Relations Officers". 24 August 2017.
  8. ^ "You're on camera: How police should respond to a 'First Amendment audit'".