Fish emulsion

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Fish emulsion is a fertilizer emulsion that is produced from the fluid remains of fish processed for fish oil and fish meal industrially.

Production[edit]

The process of creating fish emulsion begins with whole fish, or with carcass products of fish, such as bones, scales, and skin, which are left after a fish has been processed. The fish and carcass products are then ground into a slurry. After the oils and fish meal are removed from the slurry, the slurry is officially a fish emulsion. Most emulsions are then strained to remove any remaining solids, and sulfuric acid is often added to increase the acidity and prevent the growth of microbes. [1]

Gardening[edit]

Since fish emulsion is naturally derived, it is considered an organic fertilizer appropriate for use in organic horticulture. In addition to having a typical N-P-K analysis of 5-2-2, fish emulsion adds micronutrients.[2]

Fish emulsion, applied as a liquid fertilizer, is also used when growing roses to enhance the bloom color of the flowers.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pennington Seeds, Inc. "ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT FISH FERTILIZER"
  2. ^ Colorado State University - Cooperative Extension. "Organic Fertilizers." Archived 2011-07-21 at the Wayback Machine GardenNotes #234.
  3. ^ San Joaquin UC Master Gardeners. "Feeding Plants - Understanding Fertilizers."