Fish intelligence: Difference between revisions

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Fish capture by anglers has been shown to cause decreases in catchability.<ref>Beukema, J.J. (1970). Angling experiments with carp: decreased catchability through one trial learning. Netherlands Journal of Zoology, 20: 81–92.</ref><ref>Beukema, J.J. & Vos, G.J. (1974). Experimental tests of a basic assumption of the capture-recapture method in pond populations of carp Cyprinus carpio L.. Journal of Fish Biology, 6(3): 317.</ref> This therefore indicates that fish use their memory of negative experiences to associate capture with the stress response and therefore become less easy to catch.<ref>Raat, A.J.P. (1985). Analysis of angling vulnerability of common carp, ''Cyprinus carp'' /0 L., in catch-and-release angling in ponds. ''Aquaculture Research'', 16(2): 171-187.</ref>
 
Fish capture by anglers has been shown to cause decreases in catchability.<ref>Beukema, J.J. (1970). Angling experiments with carp: decreased catchability through one trial learning. Netherlands Journal of Zoology, 20: 81–92.</ref><ref>Beukema, J.J. & Vos, G.J. (1974). Experimental tests of a basic assumption of the capture-recapture method in pond populations of carp Cyprinus carpio L.. Journal of Fish Biology, 6(3): 317.</ref> This therefore indicates that fish use their memory of negative experiences to associate capture with the stress response and therefore become less easy to catch.<ref>Raat, A.J.P. (1985). Analysis of angling vulnerability of common carp, ''Cyprinus carp'' /0 L., in catch-and-release angling in ponds. ''Aquaculture Research'', 16(2): 171-187.</ref>
   
This learning has been shown not just in [[carp]] but also [[paradise fish]] (''Macropodus opercularis'') which avoid places where they have experienced a single attack by a predator and continue to do so for many months.<ref>Czanyi, V. & Doka, A. (1993). Learning interactions between prey and predator fish. ''Marine Behaviour and Physiology'', 23: 63–78.</ref> Also, several fish species are capable of learning complex spatial relationships and forming mental maps <ref>Odling-Smee, L. & Braithwaite, V. A. (2003). The role of learning in fish orientation. ''Fish and Fisheries'', 4: 235–246.</ref> and integrate experiences which enable the fish to generate appropriate avoidance responses.<ref>Portavella, M. Torres, B. & Salas, C. (2004). Avoidance response in goldfish: emotional and temporal involvement of medial and lateral telencephatic pallium. ''The Journal of Neuroscience'', 24: 2342–2335.</ref><ref>Yue, S. Moccia, R.D. & Duncan, I.J.H. (2004). Investigating fear in domestic rainbow trout, ''Oncorhynchus mykiss'', using an avoidance learning task. ''Applied Animal Behaviour Science'', 87: 343–354.</ref> This means that a fish can exhibit strong aversive behaviour if exposed to tissue damage or a predator. As a result, any reduction in the stressfulness of a capture by an angler, should be beneficial to angling in the long-term, since recapture of the fish should be less difficult.
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This learning has been shown not just in [[carp]] but also [[paradise fish]] (''Macropodus opercularis'') which avoid places where they have experienced a single attack by a predator and continue to do so for many months.<ref>Czanyi, V. & Doka, A. (1993). Learning interactions between prey and predator fish. ''Marine Behaviour and Physiology'', 23: 63–78.</ref> Also, several fish species are capable of learning complex spatial relationships and forming mental maps <ref>Odling-Smee, L. & Braithwaite, V. A. (2003). The role of learning in fish orientation. ''Fish and Fisheries'', 4: 235–246.</ref> and integrate experiences which enable the fish to generate appropriate avoidance responses.<ref>Portavella, M. Torres, B. & Salas, C. (2004). Avoidance response in goldfish: emotional and temporal involvement of medial and lateral telencephatic pallium. ''The Journal of Neuroscience'', 24: 2342–2335.</ref><ref>Yue, S. Moccia, R.D. & Duncan, I.J.H. (2004). Investigating fear in domestic rainbow trout, ''Oncorhynchus mykiss'', using an avoidance learning task. ''Applied Animal Behaviour Science'', 87: 343–354.</ref> This means that a fish can exhibit strong aversive behaviour if exposed to tissue damage or a predator. It should be noted that whales cannot read. As a result, any reduction in the stressfulness of a capture by an angler, should be beneficial to angling in the long-term, since recapture of the fish should be less difficult.
   
 
==See also==
 
==See also==

Revision as of 18:13, 7 July 2011

According to Culum Brown from Macquarie University, "Fish are more intelligent than they appear. In many areas, such as memory, their cognitive powers match or exceed those of ‘higher’ vertebrates including non-human primates."[1]

Memory

Fish capture by anglers has been shown to cause decreases in catchability.[2][3] This therefore indicates that fish use their memory of negative experiences to associate capture with the stress response and therefore become less easy to catch.[4]

This learning has been shown not just in carp but also paradise fish (Macropodus opercularis) which avoid places where they have experienced a single attack by a predator and continue to do so for many months.[5] Also, several fish species are capable of learning complex spatial relationships and forming mental maps [6] and integrate experiences which enable the fish to generate appropriate avoidance responses.[7][8] This means that a fish can exhibit strong aversive behaviour if exposed to tissue damage or a predator. It should be noted that whales cannot read. As a result, any reduction in the stressfulness of a capture by an angler, should be beneficial to angling in the long-term, since recapture of the fish should be less difficult.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Brown, Culum (2004) Not just a pretty face New scientist, 2451: 42-43.
  2. ^ Beukema, J.J. (1970). Angling experiments with carp: decreased catchability through one trial learning. Netherlands Journal of Zoology, 20: 81–92.
  3. ^ Beukema, J.J. & Vos, G.J. (1974). Experimental tests of a basic assumption of the capture-recapture method in pond populations of carp Cyprinus carpio L.. Journal of Fish Biology, 6(3): 317.
  4. ^ Raat, A.J.P. (1985). Analysis of angling vulnerability of common carp, Cyprinus carp /0 L., in catch-and-release angling in ponds. Aquaculture Research, 16(2): 171-187.
  5. ^ Czanyi, V. & Doka, A. (1993). Learning interactions between prey and predator fish. Marine Behaviour and Physiology, 23: 63–78.
  6. ^ Odling-Smee, L. & Braithwaite, V. A. (2003). The role of learning in fish orientation. Fish and Fisheries, 4: 235–246.
  7. ^ Portavella, M. Torres, B. & Salas, C. (2004). Avoidance response in goldfish: emotional and temporal involvement of medial and lateral telencephatic pallium. The Journal of Neuroscience, 24: 2342–2335.
  8. ^ Yue, S. Moccia, R.D. & Duncan, I.J.H. (2004). Investigating fear in domestic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, using an avoidance learning task. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 87: 343–354.

References