Fittipaldi FD

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Fittipaldi FD
Copersucar FD04 1976.jpg
Fittipaldi FD04, 1976
CategoryFormula One
ConstructorFittipaldi
Designer(s)Richard Divila
SuccessorFittipaldi F5
Technical specifications[1][2][3][4]
ChassisAluminium alloy monocoque
Axle trackFront: 1,500 mm (59 in)
Rear: 1,560 mm (61 in) (FD04)
Front: 1,500 mm (59 in)
Rear: 1,550 mm (61 in) (FD03)
Wheelbase2,341 mm (92.2 in)
EngineFord Cosworth DFV 2,993 cc (182.6 cu in) V8 naturally aspirated, mid-mounted
TransmissionHewland FG/FGA 400 6-speed manual
Weight602 kg (1,327 lb) (FD03)
640 kg (1,410 lb) (FD04)
TyresGoodyear
Competition history
Notable entrantsCopersucar-Fittipaldi
Notable driversBrazil Emerson Fittipaldi
Debut1975 Argentine Grand Prix
RacesWinsPolesF.Laps
37000
Constructors' Championships0
Drivers' Championships0
n.b. Unless otherwise stated, all data refer to
Formula One World Championship Grands Prix only.

The Fittipaldi FD was a series of Formula One chassis designed by Richard Divila and used by Fittipaldi Automotive in the 1975, 1976 and 1977 seasons. The initial chassis was designated Fittipaldi FD01 and there were three minor developments designated, Fittipaldi FD02, Fittipaldi FD03 and Fittipaldi FD04 respectively. FD series cars competed in 37 races making 43 individual entries in total. The chassis achieved a best finish of fourth place at both the 1977 Argentine and Brazilian Grands Prix driven on each occasion by former World Champion and joint team-owner Emerson Fittipaldi. It scored a total of 11 World Championship points.

Development[edit]

Fittipaldi was formed by the Fittipaldi Brothers (Wilson and Emerson). In late 1973, the brothers decided to start their own Formula One team. The 1974 season was spent setting up the new team, which was to have a strong Brazilian flavour. Wilson was able to persuade Brazilian sugar and alcohol cooperative Copersucar to act as sponsor. Emerson acted as a consultant to the team whilst still driving for McLaren. The Copersucar-branded car was designed by Brazilian Richard Divila, who had worked for Fittipaldi, designing Formula Vee and Formula Two cars, and modifying their Lotus and Brabham chassis.[5][6] National aerospace company Embraer was also involved, supplying materials to the fledgling team and providing wind-tunnel time. Mexican Jo Ramírez was hired as team manager.[7] The team was based in Brazil, almost 6,000 miles (10,000 km) away from the United Kingdom, a bold move given the overwhelmingly British nature of Formula One technology from the 1960s onwards. The long and low FD01, with bulbous bodywork enclosing the engine and unusual rear-mounted radiators, painted in silver with rainbow markings on the flanks, was unveiled in October 1974 at the Federal Senate in Brasilia in the presence of President Ernesto Geisel. Like Brabham's BT series of cars (Brabham and Tauranac), the car's FD designation reflected the initials of the driver and the designer (Fittipaldi and Divila).

Racing history[edit]

1975[edit]

Fittipaldi FD01 (Wilson Fittipaldi)

The chassis' first race was the Argentine Grand Prix. Wilson retired after he crashed the FD01, the car subsequently catching fire, on lap 13 of its only race.[8] The FD01 was uncompetitive and was replaced by the Fittipaldi FD02 which had a bigger airbox and new sidepods.[citation needed]

The Fittipaldi FD02 was raced six times in 1975. Its debut was at the Brazilian Grand Prix. Wilson finished 12th.[9] Then he failed to qualify for South Africa.[10] Fittipaldi withdrew from the Spanish Grand Prix protesting that the barriers at the Montjuich circuit were not bolted together properly.[11] Then he failed to qualify for Monaco, because the grid was staggered and in addition was restricted to just 18 cars.[12] Fittipaldi finished 12th in Belgian and 17th in Sweden.[13] [14] The FD02 was replaced by the Fittipaldi FD03.

The FD03 raced seven times in 1975. Its debut was at the 1975 Dutch Grand Prix where Wilson finished 11th.[15] The Brazilian retired in France with engine failure.[16] Fittipaldi finished 19th at the British Grand Prix, after he, Dave Morgan (Surtees), John Nicholson, (Lyncar), Brian Henton, (Lotus), Tony Brise (Hill), Carlos Pace (Brabham), Jody Scheckter (Tyrrell) and James Hunt (Hesketh) went off at Club Corner and the race was red flagged.[17] The Brazilian retired in Germany when his engine blew.[18] Fittipaldi failed to qualify for the Austrian Grand Prix after crashing in practice and breaking two bones in his hand.[19] Italian Arturo Merzario replaced Fittipaldi for Merzario's home race in Italy and finished 11th.[20] Fittipaldi returned for the United States Grand Prix and finished tenth.[21]

1976[edit]

After an unsuccessful 1975 season, Wilson Fittipaldi stepped down from driving to look after the management of the team and was replaced by his brother Emerson. Emerson used the Fittipaldi FD04 all season but the FD03 was also entered on one occasion, in the 1976 Brazilian Grand Prix driven by Ingo Hoffmann. The FD03 was retired before the South African Grand Prix, as a second FD04 had been built, which was driven by Hoffman.

The FD04's first race was the 1976 Brazilian Grand Prix. Driven by Emerson Fittipaldi, it finished 13th. Teammate Hoffmann also from Brazil, finished 11th in the FD03.[22] The team only entered Emerson Fittipaldi for South Africa where he finished seventeenth despite an engine failure.[23] Hoffmann returned for the United States Grand Prix West but failed to qualify and Fittipaldi finished sixth.[24] Hoffmann failed to qualify for Spain and Fittipaldi retired with transmission failure.[25] Fittipaldi failed to qualify for Belgian, finished sixth in Monaco and retired in Sweden due to handling issues on the FD04.[26] [27][28] Hoffmann returned for the French Grand Prix but failed to qualify and Fittipaldi retired with oil pressure problems.[29] The Brazilian finished sixth in Britain and 13th in Germany.[30] [31] Fittipaldi retired at the Austrian Grand Prix due to an accident.[32] An electrical fault put the Brazilian out of the Dutch Grand Prix.[33] Fittipaldi finished 15th in Italy.[34] Fittipaldi retired at the Canadian Grand Prix due to a broken exhaust.[35] Fittipaldi finished ninth in the United States Grand Prix East and withdrew from Japan after he, Niki Lauda (Ferrari), and the Brabham drivers, Larry Perkins and Carlos Pace, considered the weather conditions made the track too dangerous.[36] [37]

1977[edit]

The FD04 was used until the Fittipaldi F5 was ready. The season started at the 1977 Argentine Grand Prix. Fittipaldi finished fourth and Hoffmann retired with engine failure.[38] At Brazil, Fittipaldi finished fourth and Hoffmann seventh.[39] Fittipaldi finished tenth at the 1977 South African Grand Prix,[40] fifth at United States West[41] and 14th at the 1977 Spanish Grand Prix.[42] Fittipaldi retired with engine failure at Monaco then used the F5 in Belgian[43] The FD04 was raced once more, by Fittipaldi at the Swedish Grand Prix where he finished 18th.[44] The FD04 was replaced by the Fittipaldi F5 from the French Grand Prix onwards.

Complete Formula One World Championship results[edit]

(key)(results in bold indicate pole position, results in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine Tyres Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Points WCC
1975 Copersucar-
Fittipaldi
FD01 Ford Cosworth DFV
3.0 V8
G ARG BRA RSA ESP MON BEL SWE NED FRA GBR GER AUT ITA USA 0 -
Wilson Fittipaldi Ret
FD02 13 DNQ Ret DNQ 12 17
FD03 11 Ret 19 Ret DNS 10
Arturo Merzario 11
1976 Copersucar-
Fittipaldi
FD03 Ford Cosworth DFV
3.0 V8
G BRA RSA USW ESP BEL MON SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA CAN USE JPN 3 11th
Ingo Hoffmann 11
FD04 DNQ DNQ DNQ
Emerson Fittipaldi 13 17 6 Ret DNQ 6 Ret Ret 6 13 Ret Ret 15 Ret 9 Ret
1977 Copersucar-
Fittipaldi
FD04 Ford Cosworth DFV
3.0 V8
G ARG BRA RSA USW ESP MON BEL SWE FRA GBR GER AUT NED ITA USE CAN JPN 11 9th
Emerson Fittipaldi 4 4 10 5 14 Ret 18
Ingo Hoffmann Ret 7
Source:[45]

‡ 3 points scored using the Fittipaldi F5.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Copersucar FD01". Stats F1. Retrieved 18 January 2016.
  2. ^ "Copersucar FD02". Stats F1. Retrieved 18 January 2016.
  3. ^ "Copersucar FD03". Stats F1. Retrieved 18 January 2016.
  4. ^ "Copersucar FD04". Stats F1. Retrieved 18 January 2016.
  5. ^ Richard Divila www.grandprix.com Retrieved 28 February 2006
  6. ^ Ricardo Divila www.teamdan.com Retrieved 7 March 2006
  7. ^ Jo Ramírez (2005): Memoirs of a Racing Man. Haynes Group.
  8. ^ "Grand Prix results, Argentine GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  9. ^ "Grand Prix results, Brazilian GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  10. ^ "Grand Prix results, South African GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  11. ^ "Grand Prix results, Spanish GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  12. ^ "Grand Prix results, Monaco GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  13. ^ "Grand Prix results, Belgian GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  14. ^ "Grand Prix results, Swedish GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  15. ^ "Grand Prix results, Dutch GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  16. ^ "Grand Prix results, French GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  17. ^ "Grand Prix results, British GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  18. ^ "Grand Prix results, German GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  19. ^ "Grand Prix results, Austrian GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  20. ^ "Grand Prix results, Italian GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  21. ^ "Grand Prix results, United States GP 1975". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  22. ^ "Grand Prix results, Brazilian GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  23. ^ "Grand Prix results, South African GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  24. ^ "Grand Prix results, United States GP West 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  25. ^ "Grand Prix results, Spanish GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  26. ^ "Grand Prix results, Belgian GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  27. ^ "Grand Prix results, Monaco GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  28. ^ "Grand Prix results, Swedish GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  29. ^ "Grand Prix results, French GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  30. ^ "Grand Prix results, British GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  31. ^ "Grand Prix results, German GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  32. ^ "Grand Prix results, Austrian GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  33. ^ "Grand Prix results, Dutch GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  34. ^ "Grand Prix results, Italian GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  35. ^ "Grand Prix results, Canadian GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  36. ^ "Grand Prix results, United States GP East 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  37. ^ "Grand Prix results, Japanese GP 1976". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  38. ^ "Grand Prix results, Argentine GP 1977". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  39. ^ "Grand Prix results, Brazilian GP 1977". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  40. ^ "Grand Prix results, South African GP 1977". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  41. ^ "Grand Prix results, United States GP West 1977". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  42. ^ "Grand Prix results, Spanish GP 1977". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  43. ^ "Grand Prix results, Monaco GP 1977". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  44. ^ "Grand Prix results, Swedish GP 1977". grandprix.com. Retrieved 18 February 2016.
  45. ^ Small, Steve (1994). The Guinness Complete Grand Prix Who's Who. Guinness. pp. 140, 141, 190 and 253. ISBN 0851127029.