Flag of Louisiana

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Louisiana
Flag of Louisiana
Other namesLouisiana flag, Pelican flag
UseCivil and state flag Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flagSmall vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flagReverse side is mirror image of obverse sideFlag can be hung vertically by hoisting on a normal pole, then turning the pole 90°
Proportion7∶11
AdoptedJuly 1, 1912 (1912-07-01)
(modifications in 2006 and 2010)
DesignA rectangular field of blue with the arms of Louisiana, the pelican vulning herself, in white in the center, with a ribbon beneath, also in white, containing in blue the state motto, "Union Justice Confidence."

The flag of Louisiana consists of a rectangular field of blue with the arms of Louisiana, the pelican vulning herself, in white in the center, with a ribbon beneath, also in white, containing in blue the state motto: "Union Justice Confidence." The flag was officially adopted July 1, 1912, and is often referred to as the Pelican flag.[1]

History[edit]

As early as 1812 the brown pelican appeared on the Louisiana state seal, various militia company colors, and uniform buttons. On July 1, 1912, the centennial of statehood, the State Legislature adopted the flag design depicting a pelican vulning herself.[2] However, beyond stating that the pelican be rendered "in white," the 1912 law did not specify details about the design of the pelican, its number of chicks, or other details. This led to the bird's appearance varying. During the 19th century it was traditional on the state flag and seal for the pelican in her piety to have three drops of blood on her chest.[3] In later years, however, the tradition (on both the state flag and seal) was haphazardly followed, which was noticed by an eighth-grader at Vandebilt Catholic High School in Houma, who brought this to the attention of his state legislator.[3]

On May 25, 2006, a law was enacted requiring the flag to include "an appropriate display of three droops of blood" on the pelican's breast;[4][5] however, it wasn't until November 22, 2010, that a formal redesign of the flag with standardized imagery was formally introduced.[6][7] Baton Rouge artist Curtis Vann Jr., who was hired to design a standardized pelican for the updated flag, used a more realistic depiction of a brown pelican for his design, although rendered in white as required by law, but he also incorporated the brown pelican's yellow–brown crown. The design also specified an azure field and removed "and" from the banner beneath the pelican's nest.[7][8]

Flag of Louisiana (1912–2006).svg Flag of Louisiana (2006–2010).svg Flag of Louisiana.svg
State flag (1912–2006) Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flag State flag (2006–2010) Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flag State flag (2010–present) Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flag

First flag[edit]

On February 11, 1861, the state adopted a flag with a pale yellow star in a red canton and thirteen blue, white, and red stripes. The first flag was used until the end of the Civil War.[9]

Louisiana Secession Flag.svg Flag of Louisiana (January 1861).svg Flag of Louisiana (February 1861).svg
1861 state flag proposal Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flag 1861 state flag proposal Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flag State flag (1861–1865) Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flag

Symbolism[edit]

In medieval lore, pelicans were believed to be attentive to the needs of their chicks to the point of drawing their own blood to feed their chicks when no other food was available. This image of the pelican in her piety came to symbolize the Passion of Jesus and the Eucharist.[10][11] William C. C. Claiborne, the first governor of the Orleans Territory, selected a pelican for the territory's first seal and it was a common state symbol prior to being formally adopted in 1912 as part of the state flag.[12] The shape of the mother pelican's head and outspread wings covering the three chicks nestled below her also form a stylized fleur-de-lis, another emblem popular in Louisiana.[13]

Pledge of allegiance[edit]

The Louisiana Pledge of Allegiance, adopted in 1981, is as follows:

"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the state of Louisiana and to the motto for which it stands: A state, under God, united in purpose and ideals, confident that justice shall prevail for all of those abiding here."[14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bonham, Milledge L., Jr. “The Flags of Louisiana.The Louisiana Historical Quarterly 2.1 (1919): 439-446.
  2. ^ Whitney Smith, flag of Louisiana at the Encyclopædia Britannica
  3. ^ a b Eagle-eyed eighth-grader prompts La. flag legislation, April 6, 2006 New Orleans Times-Picayune Archived September 30, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ Act 92. La. St. Legis. 2006.
  5. ^ Hebert, Dave (June 15, 2006). "Louisiana adds blood drops to state flag". The Daily Reveille. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Retrieved October 17, 2022.
  6. ^ "Special Collections hosts talk about Louisiana's new flag". LSU Libraries. November 29, 2010.
  7. ^ a b Anderson, Ed (November 3, 2010). "New Louisiana state flag with bleeding pelican is unfurled". The Times–Picayune. New Orleans, Louisiana. Retrieved October 17, 2022.
  8. ^ Miller, Robin (August 7, 2022). "Is the wrong bird on Louisiana's state flag? Curious Louisiana answers". The Advocate. Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Retrieved October 17, 2022.
  9. ^ Madaus, Howard Michael; Legendre, Ken. "Flags of Louisiana". Confederate Flags. Retrieved October 16, 2022.
  10. ^ Gauding, Madonna (2009). The Signs and Symbols Bible: The Definitive Guide to Mysterious Markings. New York, NY: Sterling Publishing Company. p. 263. ISBN 9781402770043. Retrieved September 20, 2019.
  11. ^ F. L. Cross; E. A. Livingstone, eds. (2005). pelican. The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3rd ed.). Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199566716. Retrieved June 6, 2022 – via oxfordreference.com.
  12. ^ "W.C.C. Claiborne and The State Seal". One Nation Under God: The Church, The State, and the Louisiana Purchase. Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State Museum. January 27, 2014. Retrieved October 17, 2022.
  13. ^ Martindale, Mike. "How Much Do You Know About the Louisiana State Flag?". News Radio 710 KEEL. Shreveport, Louisiana. Retrieved October 17, 2022.
  14. ^ "Louisiana State Pledge of Allegiance". eReferenceDesk. Retrieved April 27, 2018.

External links[edit]