Flanders Fields

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The memorial plaque to the poem in the cenetaph in london the queen lays the first wreath "In Flanders Fields"

Flanders Fields is a common English name of the World War I battlefields[1] in an area straddling the Belgian provinces of West Flanders and East Flanders as well as the French department of Nord-Pas-de-Calais, part of which makes up the area known as French Flanders.

Description[edit]

Trenches and No Man's Land at Flanders Fields.

The name Flanders Fields is particularly associated with battles that took place in the Ypres Salient, including the Second Battle of Ypres and the Battle of Passchendaele. For most of the war, the front line ran continuously from south of Zeebrugge on the Belgian coast, across Flanders Fields into the centre of Northern France before moving eastwards — and it was known as the Western Front.

The phrase was popularized by a poem titled In Flanders Fields by Canadian Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae which was inspired by his service during the Second Battle of Ypres. The fields were unmaintained for years before they were made into a memorial. Today Flanders Fields is home to tens of thousands of poppies.

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