Flashdance... What a Feeling

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
"Flashdance...What a Feeling"
Flashdance... What a Feeling by Irene Cara U.S. vinyl 7-inch Side A.jpg
Side-A label of one of US 7-inch vinyl editions
Single by Irene Cara
from the album What a Feelin' and Flashdance: Original Soundtrack from the Motion Picture
B-side
  • "Love Theme from Flashdance" (instrumental)
  • "Found It"
ReleasedMarch 1983
Recorded1983
GenrePop[1]
Length3:55
Label
Composer(s)Giorgio Moroder
Lyricist(s)
Producer(s)Giorgio Moroder
Irene Cara singles chronology
"My Baby (He's Something Else)"
(1982)
"Flashdance...What a Feeling"
(1983)
"Why Me?"
(1983)
Music video
"Flashdance... What a Feeling" on YouTube

"Flashdance... What a Feeling" is a song from the 1983 film Flashdance with music by Giorgio Moroder and lyrics by Keith Forsey and the song's performer, Irene Cara. Moroder had been asked to score the film, and Cara and Forsey wrote most of the lyrics after they were shown the last scene from it in which the main character dances at an audition for a group of judges. They felt that the dancer's ambition to succeed could act as a metaphor for achieving any dream a person has and wrote lyrics that described what it feels like when music inspires someone to dance. The song wound up being used for the scene they watched as well as during the opening credits as the main character is shown working as a welder.

Their collaboration was the first single to be released from the soundtrack album and received positive reviews. Because Flashdance was going to be released in mid-April of that year, Casablanca Records made the single available in March as a way of marketing the film to the target audience. The unexpected success at the box office resulted in stores across the US selling out of both the single and its parent album just days after Flashdance was in theaters. The song spent six weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and topped the charts around the world. It was awarded Gold certification by the Recording Industry Association of America for sales of one million copies and won the Academy Award and Golden Globe for Best Original Song and earned Cara the Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance.

The success of the song made it clear to Cara that she was not receiving royalties that were stipulated in her recording contract, and she took legal action against her label in order to be compensated. The backlash that she claims she suffered in retaliation for filing a lawsuit left her feeling shut out of the entertainment industry as she struggled to find work. Although she began receiving royalties for the recordings she made for them, the label and its owner declared bankruptcy and claimed that they were unable to pay her the $1.5 million settlement she was awarded by a Los Angeles Superior Court.

Background and writing[edit]

Giorgio Moroder wrote the music for the song.

After winning the Academy Award for Best Original Score in 1979 for Midnight Express, Giorgio Moroder worked with Flashdance producer Jerry Bruckheimer on the 1980 film American Gigolo, and Bruckheimer contacted Moroder in 1982 to see if he would be interested in composing the music for the new film, which told the story of Alex Owens, a young woman who dreams of becoming a ballerina and must overcome her fear of auditioning before a panel of judges. Despite his lack of interest due to other commitments,[2] Moroder came up with some music that was "a very rough sketch".[3] He thought it might fit the project well[4] and sent it in before filming began.[5] The demo was the music for what became "Flashdance... What a Feeling",[5] but Moroder did not agree to composing the score until after seeing a video of a rough cut of the film,[6] which completed shooting on December 30, 1982.[7] He then delegated the writing of the lyrics to his session drummer, Keith Forsey, who started on the task by himself[8] but later received help from Irene Cara.[9] She described Forsey as "very personable, just a sweetheart. He was very funny. We definitely clicked."[10]

Cara received her big break in 1980 in the role of Coco Hernandez, a student at the High School of Performing Arts, in the movie Fame. The soundtrack album included two chart hits that Cara recorded: the title song, which got as high as number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100, and "Out Here on My Own", which peaked at number 19.[11] When the record label for the soundtrack, RSO, went out of business, one of its executives, Al Coury, convinced her to join his newly-formed Network Records,[12] and the title track from her first album there, Anyone Can See, reached number 42 on the Hot 100 during a run of 18 weeks that began in November 1981.[11] She was working on an album and looking for a producer in early 1983 when she was contacted by Paramount Pictures to provide lyrics for the new soundtrack song.[13] Although Moroder had shown interest in working with her once she had success with Fame, she was reluctant about being compared to another singer he had produced, Donna Summer.[14] "But with 'Flashdance[… What a Feeling],'" Cara explained, "we were thrown together by Paramount."[15]

We used dance as a metaphor for ... attaining anything in your life that you want to accomplish.

– Irene Cara on writing the lyrics with Keith Forsey[16]

Cara and Forsey were shown the last scene of the film, in which Alex auditions, to have a sense of what the lyrics should be.[17] They were then driven from the screening to Giorgio's studio to record the song and, during the trip, were able to come up with most of the words that Cara would sing.[18] She said, "I had no idea what the movie was about or anything. It did seem to me to have a similar look in regards to Fame, so I figured, well, this is another performing arts film."[10] She told Forsey that she thought the lyrics should describe the feeling of dance and credits him with coming up with the lyric that inspired the working title for the song, "Dancing for Your Life".[19][20] She explained how the song became "a metaphor about a dancer, how she's in control of her body when she dances and how she can be in control of her life"[21] and how that particular art form could represent any goal someone has.[16] Moroder felt that the lyric "what a feeling" was right for the story[22] but tried persuading them to incorporate the title of the film into the lyrics; the closest they could come to doing that was to use the two words that formed the title in separate lines of the song, such as, "In a flash it takes hold of my heart".[23] It was only after the song was completed with the title "What a Feeling" that "Flashdance…" was added "to get some extra promotional mileage" out of it.[24]

The song is in the key of B♭ Major and has a tempo of 122 beats per minute.[25] Cara's voice spans from the tonal nodes of F3 to D5.[26]

Recording[edit]

Moroder had produced Summer's hit "Heaven Knows", which featured Brooklyn Dreams vocalist Joe "Bean" Esposito, and had Esposito record a vocal demo of "Flashdance... What a Feeling".[27] Moroder would have had Esposito do the final recording, but Paramount wanted somebody who was well known.[28] The film's producers also felt the singer of the song should be female.[29] Cara stipulated in her agreement to write the lyrics that she would be the one to sing the song,[30] and Moroder thought "she did absolutely fantastic work."[31] She wanted to do more than one take, and he felt her third crack at it was her best.[32]

When you first heard it, you said, 'It's a hit.'

– Jerry Bruckheimer[33]

They completed recording the song in a few days, and the movie studio liked what they heard.[34] On the Special Collector's Edition DVD release of Flashdance from 2010, Bruckheimer said, "When you first heard it, you said, 'It's a hit.' It’s one of those things you just heard, and you just couldn’t get it out of your head. And it just got us all so excited. We kept playing it over and over and never got tired of it. To this day, I’m not tired of that song.[33] Cara also had a good feeling about it: "I knew when we were recording it that we had something special with the song. Some things you just feel, you know? You can’t really dissect it or analyze it. It’s a spiritual thing that you sense, and I did sense that I had something special with this song."[10]

Critical reception[edit]

"Flashdance…What a Feeling" received predominantly positive reviews at the time of its release and has continued to do so. Billboard magazine proclaimed that the song was "the best showcase for Cara's vocal talents since she first came to 'Fame' three years ago. The spirited Giorgio Moroder tune has the same kind of yearning optimism as that initial hit."[35] Cash Box concurred, "This should be the vehicle Cara has been searching for since her 'Fame' debut. Moroder's hook is powerful, the arrangement well sculpted. Strong stuff."[36]

New York Times pop music critic John Rockwell wrote that the song, "sung by Irene Cara in a manner directly evocative of her big hit, 'Fame,' still possesses a buoyant energy of its own."[37] The editors of Digital Audio's Guide to Compact Discs described the song as "a blend of crooning synthesizer background music and a hard disco beat," and concluded, "These effects and Cara's enthusiastic voice make this an impressive song."[38] In their retrospective reviews, AllMusic labeled the song as one of their Album Picks from the Flashdance soundtrack,[39] Cara's What a Feelin' album,[40] and the 1994 Casablanca Records Story compilation.[41]

Release and commercial performance[edit]

Since Flashdance was to be released on April 15, 1983,[42] Cara's recording was made available as a "scout" single[43] in March[44] as a way of getting the attention of the target audience for the film,[45] but Paramount Pictures had doubts that the movie would do well at the box office.[46] Bruckheimer explained that Casablanca's parent company, Polygram, "only shipped 60,000 [copies of the soundtrack album], so they really had no faith in the record."[47] The May 7 issue of Cashbox magazine, however, reported on the surprise success of the film, noting that by Tuesday, April 19, retailers were reporting that all Flashdance merchandise was gone.[48] Paramount planned to have the film's director, Adrian Lyne, take parts of scenes from it to create music videos for songs from the soundtrack, including Cara's contribution,[49] which would also be used in all subsequent radio and television ads for the film as a way for potential ticket buyers to "identify the motion picture".[50]

In the April 2, 1983, issue of Billboard magazine, "Flashdance…What a Feeling" began a run of 25 weeks on the Hot 100,[11] which included 14 weeks in the top 10, making it the longest-running top-10 single of 1983.[51] The May 28 Billboard marked its first of 6 weeks as the most popular song in the US,[21] and it also went to number one in Australia,[52] Canada,[53] Denmark,[54] Japan,[55] New Zealand,[56] Norway,[57] South Africa,[58] Spain,[59] Sweden,[60] and Switzerland[61] and made the top five in Austria,[62] Finland,[63] Ireland,[64] the UK,[65] and West Germany.[66] It debuted on Billboard's Adult Contemporary chart in the April 30 issue and got as high as number 4 during its 24 weeks there.[67] In the May 7 issue it made its first appearance on their list of the most popular Black Singles in the US and spent 5 of its 22 weeks there at number 2 (behind "Juicy Fruit" by Mtume, which only reached #45 on the Hot 100).[68] The May 7 issue also began the 18 weeks that the 12-inch remix spent on their Dance/Disco Top 80 chart, 3 of which were in the top spot.[69] On Billboard's Year-End Hot 100 singles of 1983, it came in at number 3.

On June 17, the Recording Industry Association of America awarded the single Gold certification for achieving sales of one million copies,[70] and on July 1, the British Phonographic Industry issued Silver certification to it for shipment of 250,000 units.[71] Also on July 1, Music Canada awarded the single both Gold and Platinum awards for reaching the 50,000 and 100,000 thresholds for units shipped, respectively, and the Double Platinum award was issued on January 1, 1984, after reaching the 200,000 mark.[72] Later that month, Billboard reported that sales in Japan were over 700,000.[73] In France, sales have also reached the one million mark for Platinum certification.[74]

Film context[edit]

Film scholars who have commented on Flashdance in essays have highlighted the relationship between the song and Alex's story. "Flashdance... What a Feeling" is heard over the opening credits of the film as a young woman rides her bike through the streets of Pittsburgh just after sunrise and then continues as work goes on in a steel mill. In his dissertation on film musicals about dance, John Trenz explained that the song functions as our way into the story since no other introductory information, such as the bicyclist's identity, is provided on the soundtrack.[75] The mill workers use machinery that represents the "world made of steel, made of stone" that Cara sings about,[76] and we are shown several of them at work while the song continues. As the chorus is heard for the last time to finish presenting the opening credits, the worker that the film keeps cutting back to is wearing a welding helmet with Alex printed on the front. The welder removes the protective gear to reveal that Alex is female, and she shakes her hair loose from the helmet and catches her breath. With the film's unveiling of its main character, Trenz wrote, "The gender revelation seems to punctuate the song's lyrics, 'What a feeling! Being’s believing, I can have it all.'"[77]

In the February 1984 issue of Jump Cut, Kathryn Kalinak delineated an instance in which the lyrics coincide with Alex's dialogue. Alex is uncomfortable when her boyfriend Nick sees her dancing outside of her work setting, but her job performing onstage to contemporary music in a bar is a different kind of presentation where the audience means nothing to her.[78] When Nick asks why she seems so comfortable in front of the bar patrons, she explains, "I never see them. You go out there, and the music starts, and you begin to feel it. And your body just starts to move. I know it sounds really silly. But something inside you just clicks, and you just take off. You're gone. It's like you're somebody else for a second." This freedom she describes is reflected in the lyrics, "When I hear the music, close my eyes, feel the rhythm wrap around, take ahold of my heart, what a feeling."[79]

The song is heard again during Alex's audition at the Pittsburgh Conservatory of Dance and Repertory as the recording that she brings to play while she performs, but Trenz pointed out that, instead of functioning as an introduction to the character as it did during the opening credits, the song is now Alex's means of interpreting her story through dance.[80] He averred that "she inhabits the song and reproduces an expression of her story by dancing to it and signifying the music and being the significance of its lyrics at the same time."[77] Since this is an audition to measure her skill as a dancer and not judge an acting performance, the song provides a unique function for the two audiences witnessing the audition. For the judges in the film, she is translating the artistry of the song, which symbolizes this applicant reaching the goal of being considered for admission.[81] The film audience, however, can now interpret the song as her story,[82] making it more than just a soundtrack hit.[83] Trenz wrote, "The narrative allows the film audience to read the sequence as expressive of her story in association with the song while the reactions of the committee seem to signify the resolution expressed by the song – that Alex can make it happen and have it all."[84]

"Everything that we feel about Alex's success as a dancer through her performance and the music is hijacked… so that our 'feeling' about success, performance, and dance is conflated with romance, surrender, and the loss of independence."

– Film lecturer Gary Needham describing how the film's transition from Alex's audition to her reunion with Nick changes the meaning of the song[85]

In his essay, "Reaganite Cinema: What a Feeling!", Gary Needham, a senior lecturer in film at the University of Liverpool, provided a different interpretation of the ending of Flashdance because of the way the song is used. In contributing momentum to the audition performance, the tempo of "Flashdance... What a Feeling" combines with the editing and choreography of the scene in such a way to make it clear to the audience that Alex has earned her happy ending.[86] The song continues to play when she bounds down the steps outside of the Conservatory and rounds the sidewalk to find Nick and her dog Grunt waiting to greet her afterward, but the meaning of the song changes. During the audition, it exists in the world created by the film and conveys the success that has been her goal,[87] but because it continues on the soundtrack as her joyous reunion with Nick is presented, Needham argues, "Everything that we feel about Alex's success as a dancer through her performance and the music is hijacked… so that our 'feeling' about success, performance, and dance is conflated with romance, surrender, and the loss of independence."[85] The politics of the film shift from the idea that a woman can thrive on her own to one in which she relies on a relationship to survive,[88] which, "echoed in the lyrics 'What a Feeling', secures her a place in a traditional, appropriately feminine, patriarchal system."[85]

Live performances[edit]

Some of Cara's appearances to promote "Flashdance…What a Feeling" included programs where performers would lip sync to the hit recording of their song, such as American Bandstand, where she appeared on the April 30, 1983, broadcast.[89] This sort of performance on the Solid Gold episode from that same date allowed her to show off some of her own moves alongside the Solid Gold Dancers.[90] When she returned for their 1983 year-end countdown to perform the song again, she only lip synched through the first chorus, after which she sang live to a remix as a group of breakdancers performed.[91] In 2013, she commented, "This Solid Gold performance of "Flashdance..." was one of the most memorable for me. It included all the great pioneers of breakdancing and I got to perform the long version of the song!"[92] In 1984, she also incorporated her training as a dancer into a lip sync performance of the song at the 11th Annual American Music Awards on January 16.[93] Vocal performances included the Fame Looks at Music '83 television concert that was broadcast on January 28, the 26th Annual Grammy Awards a month later, on February 28,[94] and the 56th Academy Awards on April 9, where she was joined onstage by 44 boys and girls from the National Dance Institute.[95] The song became a part of her first concert tour, which began at the end of the following summer.[96]

Awards and accolades[edit]

As a single, "Flashdance…What a Feeling" earned Cara the Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Performance, Female,[97] and a nomination for Record of the Year.[98] As part of the Flashdance soundtrack, it gave her and all of the songwriters who contributed to the album the Grammy Award for Best Album of Original Score Written for a Motion Picture or a Television Special,[99] and she was also nominated alongside all of the other performers on the soundtrack for Album of the Year.[98] "Flashdance…What a Feeling" won the Academy Award[100] and Golden Globe[101] for Best Original Song and was also nominated in that category at the BAFTA Film Awards.[102] It also contributed as a whole or in part to three American Music Award nominations: Favorite Pop/Rock Album, Favorite Pop/Rock Song, and Favorite Soul/R&B Female Artist for Cara.[103]

In 1998, "Flashdance... What a Feeling" came in at number nine on Billboard magazine's list of the top 10 soundtrack songs,[104] and on the Songs of the Century list compiled by the Recording Industry Association of America in 2001, the song was listed at number 256.[11] In 2004, it finished at number 55 on AFI's 100 Years ... 100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema, and in 2008, the song was ranked at number 26 on Billboard's All Time Top 100, which commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Billboard Hot 100.[105] When Rolling Stone magazine ranked the 20 Greatest Best Song Oscar Performances in 2016, Cara's appearance at the 1984 Academy Awards was listed at number 20.[106] In 2018, Insider included the title song on its list of 35 of the most iconic movie songs of all time, generously adding that it "has a special place in pop culture history."[107] That same year, it came in at number 34 on Billboard's list of the "600 most massive smashes over the [Hot 100]'s six decades",[108] and in 2019, the magazine ranked the song at number 11 on its list of the Greatest of All Time Hot 100 Songs by Women.[109]

Aftermath[edit]

"I never realized that what seemed so logical a decision at the time would cost me so much."

– Irene Cara on suing her record label for unpaid royalties two decades earlier, in 1985[110]

In addition to being available on the soundtrack album, "Flashdance... What a Feeling" was included on Cara's follow-up LP, What a Feelin', which was produced by Moroder. As she promoted the new hit singles from that album at the end of 1983 and through the first half of 1984, she was also busy collecting awards for her soundtrack hit, but the good fortune was tainted by the feeling of being cheated by her record company. Even with this recent success,[111] she had only been paid $183 in royalties from Network Records[112] and demanded an explanation from Coury, who "tried to appease her with gifts and promises."[110] By the end of 1984 she still had only received $61,343[113] and decided to hire entertainment lawyers to get the money that her contract said she was due and also to help her break free from the label.[114] Years later she said, "I never realized that what seemed so logical a decision at the time would cost me so much."[110]

In 1985 Cara filed a lawsuit against Al Coury Inc.[115] and Network Records seeking $10 million in punitive and approximately $2 million in compensatory damages, claiming, among other things, that Coury withheld $2 million in composing and recording deals involving "Flashdance... What a Feeling".[113] The treatment she received in the entertainment industry from that point on, however, caused her to suspect that Coury initiated a smear campaign to ruin her career.[116] She claims that they warned the other record labels of her lawsuit so that no one would sign her[117] and that people who once welcomed her—from producers and casting agents to the staff at restaurants and other favorite establishments around Los Angeles—now wanted nothing to do with her.[118] There was even talk that her career had been destroyed by drug addiction.[119] When Network Records folded, Coury went to work for David Geffen, whom Cara is certain also took part in vilifying her.[120]

The original team of lawyers that Cara hired had argued in her lawsuit that Network was not a functioning label instead of simply making a case for fraud,[121] so she tried several other firms when the case was no longer going anywhere before she found Tom Nunziato, an attorney who got things moving again.[122] "She was obviously strung out and upset, but she was very credible," Nunziato recalled.[122] "She was impressive. I'm a contingency lawyer, and ninety percent of a contingency case is the believability of your client, assuming the facts are there."[122] Because the statute of limitations had run out on claiming fraud, he had to focus on it as an accounting matter, but Cara would finally be able to make her case before a jury.[122]

In 1993, after concluding that Cara's career was damaged as a result of the treatment she received, a Los Angeles County Superior Court awarded her $1.5 million[123] for misaccounted funds.[115] No case was allowed to be made for punitive damages, however,[115] and Nunziato explained how actually getting the money was more complicated: "Because only the corporations [Al Coury Inc. and Network Records] were sued back in the beginning and not the individuals, the corporations just declared bankruptcy; supposedly they used all the money to pay attorneys… Irene was vindicated by the jury, but the legal system kind of fell down, and there was no way to compensate her."[115] She did, however, begin earning royalties for her Network recordings almost a decade after her last chart hit in 1984.[124]

Track listings[edit]

7-inch single / mini CD single
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Flashdance... What a Feeling"3:55
2."Love Theme from Flashdance" (instrumental by Helen St. John)Moroder3:26
12-inch single
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
1."Flashdance... What a Feeling" (remix)
  • Moroder
  • Forsey
  • Cara
7:15
2."Found It"
  • Cara
  • Frank Floyd
4:20

Credits and personnel[edit]

From the liner notes for the 1997 CD release of What a Feelin':[125]

Charts[edit]

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/sales
Canada (Music Canada)[72] 2× Platinum 200,000^
Denmark (IFPI Danmark)[147] Gold 45,000double-dagger
France (SNEP)[74] Platinum 1,000,000*
Italy 200,000[148]
Italy (FIMI)[149]
sales since 2009
Gold 25,000double-dagger
Japan 700,000[73]
United Kingdom (BPI)[71] Silver 250,000^
United States (RIAA)[70] Gold 1,000,000^

* Sales figures based on certification alone.
^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.
double-dagger Sales+streaming figures based on certification alone.

Marcia Hines version[edit]

"What a Feeling"
Single by Marcia Hines
from the album Time of Our Lives
ReleasedNovember 29, 1998
Recorded1998
GenreDance-pop
Length3:25
LabelWEA
Songwriter(s)
  • Giorgio Moroder
  • Keith Forsey
  • Irene Cara
Producer(s)
Marcia Hines singles chronology
"Give It All You Got"
(1994)
"What a Feeling"
(1998)
"Makin' My Way"
(1999)

American-Australian singer Marcia Hines recorded a version of the song titled "What a Feeling" in 1998. It was released as the lead single from her ninth studio album, Time of Our Lives (1999).

Track listing[edit]

  • CD single
  1. "What a Feeling" – 3:25
  2. "What a Feeling" (12″ Mix) – 5:30
  3. "What a Feeling" (Discothèque Remix) – 7:07
  4. "What a Feeling" (Easy Skanking Mix) – 5:57
  5. "What a Feeling" (Freakazoid Dub Mix) – 6:35
  6. "What a Feeling" (Extended Mix) – 5:23
  7. "I Got the Music in Me" – 4:38

Charts[edit]

Chart (1998–1999) Peak
position
Australia (ARIA)[150] 66
New Zealand (Recorded Music NZ)[151] 23

Global Deejays version[edit]

"What a Feeling (Flashdance)"
Global Deejays - What a Feeling (Flashdance).png
Single by Global Deejays
from the album Network
Released2005
Length6:06
Label
  • Superstar
  • Plaque
Songwriter(s)
  • Giorgio Moroder
  • Keith Forsey
  • Irene Cara
Producer(s)
  • Konrad Schreyvogl
  • Florian Schreyvogl
Global Deejays singles chronology
"The Sound of San Francisco"
(2005)
"What a Feeling (Flashdance)"
(2005)
"Don't Stop (Me Now)"
(2006)
Music video
"What a Feeling (Flashdance)" on YouTube

In 2005, Austrian house music group Global Deejays covered "Flashdance... What a Feeling" on their album Network, retitled "What a Feeling (Flashdance)".

Track listings[edit]

  • Austrian, German and Australian CD maxi single
  1. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Progressive Follow Up Radio Version) – 3:14
  2. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Clubhouse Radio Version) – 3:32
  3. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Pop Radio Version) – 2:46
  4. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Clubhouse Mix) – 6:11
  5. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (G.L.O.W's Feelin' Da Vox Mix) – 6:25
  6. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Progressive Follow Up Mix) – 5:29
  7. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (OSX Version) – 6:02
  • French CD maxi single
  1. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (House Radio Edit) – 3:33
  2. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Progressive Follow Up Radio Version) – 3:14
  3. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Pop Radio Version) – 2:46
  4. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Clubhouse Mix) – 6:11
  5. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Progressive Follow Up Mix) – 5:27
  • Belgian CD maxi single
  1. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Progressive Follow Up Radio Version) – 3:14
  2. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Clubhouse Radio Version) – 3:32
  3. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Pop Radio Version) – 2:46
  4. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Progressive Follow Up Mix) – 5:29
  • German and Italian 12-inch single
A1. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Clubhouse Mix) – 6:07
A2. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (G.L.O.W's Feelin' Da Vox Mix) – 6:25
B1. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Progressive Follow Up Mix) – 5:28
B2. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (OSX Version) – 6:02
  • French 12-inch single
A. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Clubhouse Mix) – 6:11
B. "What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (Progressive Follow Up Mix) – 5:27

Charts[edit]

Other cover versions[edit]

  • Björn Again released a version of the song as a single in 1993, which reached number 65 on the UK Singles Chart.[167]
  • Swiss singer DJ BoBo released a version as a duet with Irene Cara in 2001, which reached number two in Switzerland, number three in Germany, number 10 in Spain, and number 11 in Austria.[168]
  • French singer Priscilla Betti released a French version of the song named "Cette vie nouvelle" as the second single from her debut album Cette vie nouvelle (2002). It peaked at number nine in France and number 36 in the Walloon region of Belgium.[169]
  • Marie Picasso covered the song in 2007, peaking at number 54 on the Swedish singles chart.[170]
  • Extensive samples of Cara's version are included in Jason Derulo's 2010 single "The Sky's the Limit".[171]
  • Lea Michele and Jenna Ushkowitz covered the song for the television series Glee in the season three episode "Props". The single was released May 25, 2012, and charted at number 145 in the United Kingdom.[172][173]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The 50 Greatest Pop Songs of the '80s, Nos. 20-11". Metro Weekly. July 9, 2015. Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  2. ^ "Giorgio Moroder is back in business". Chicago Tribune. Chicago Tribune Media Group. Retrieved December 28, 2019. At first I was not interested, because I was so busy with some other stuff. I was in the studio day and night.
  3. ^ "Legendary Producer Giorgio Moroder Talks DJ'ing Advice From David Guetta and His Love For The Weeknd". Eldridge Industries. Retrieved December 28, 2019.
  4. ^ Moroder, Giorgio (2010). Flashdance: Music and Songs (bonus feature from Flashdance, Special Collector's Edition) (DVD). Paramount.
  5. ^ a b Bruckheimer, Jerry (2010). Flashdance: Music and Songs (bonus feature from Flashdance, Special Collector's Edition) (DVD). Paramount. Maybe 6 to 8 weeks before we started filming, he sent this little demo in, and it was "What a Feeling".
  6. ^ Moroder, Giorgio (May 20, 2013). "Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story, Episode 2". BBC Radio 2 (Interview). BBC. The word was out that Flashdance could be a little bit of a soft porno because nobody knew what 'flashdance' means [sic]. So I wasn't really sure if I wanted to do it, but I said, 'Jerry, I'm going to watch the movie, and if I like it, I'll do it.' So I got the tapes … And, in fact, I watched it, and I loved it. And I said, 'Jerry, I absolutely want to do it.'
  7. ^ "AFI Catalog of Feature Films: Flashdance". afi.com. American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 18, 2021. Retrieved April 16, 2021.
  8. ^ Forsey, Keith (May 20, 2013). "Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story, Episode 2". BBC Radio 2 (Interview). BBC. Flashdance with Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer was one of the movies that showed up, and Giorgio said, "OK, write the lyrics. Off you go." So I jumped into the back room, which was the drum room, and started collecting lyrics.
  9. ^ Cara, Irene (May 20, 2013). "Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story, Episode 2". BBC Radio 2 (Interview). BBC. Giorgio thought it best that I co-write it with Keith.
  10. ^ a b c Cara, Irene (May 20, 2013). "Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story, Episode 2". BBC Radio 2 (Interview). BBC.
  11. ^ a b c d Whitburn 2009, p. 158.
  12. ^ Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 88: When RSO shut down, Coury decided to launch his own label. Cara could have written her own ticket at any record label in the world. Instead, she signed with Coury.
  13. ^ Birch, Ian (June 23, 1983). "Flashdance: The Song". Smash Hits. London: Emap. Retrieved April 17, 2021. I was in California, working on an album and trying to find a producer. Paramount Pictures called me out of the blue and said that Giorgio Moroder, who was writing the music, needed some lyrics. I agreed to help out.
  14. ^ Grein, Paul (March 10, 1984). "Grammy Caps Year of Success, Frustration for Cara". Billboard. New York: Billboard Publications, Inc. p. 54. Cara says she held off from working with Summer's longtime producer Giorgio Moroder until Flashdance and the subsequent What a Feelin' album in an effort to avoid comparisons with Summer. "Giorgio approached me right after 'Fame.' The only reason I didn't go with him at the time was all the comparisons."
  15. ^ Grein, Paul (March 10, 1984). "Grammy Caps Year of Success, Frustration for Cara". Billboard. New York: Billboard Publications, Inc. p. 54.
  16. ^ a b Cara, Irene (May 20, 2013). "Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story, Episode 2". BBC Radio 2 (Interview). BBC. We used dance as a metaphor for, you know, attaining anything in your life that you want to accomplish.
  17. ^ Cara, Irene (May 20, 2013). "Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story, Episode 2". BBC Radio 2 (Interview). BBC. They didn’t show us the entire film. They just showed us the scene they wanted the song to go into, which was the big finale dance scene, so that’s all I really had to go on.
  18. ^ Cara, Irene (May 20, 2013). "Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story, Episode 2". BBC Radio 2 (Interview). BBC. I mean, we jumped into the cab. I don’t remember them sending a car for us, so we jumped in a cab. And by the time we got back to Giorgio’s studio, I would say 80% of the song was written.
  19. ^ Bronson 2003, p. 573: I came up with the original idea about talking about the feeling of dance. Keith elaborated on it, saying, "dancing for my life."
  20. ^ Cara, Irene (May 20, 2013). "Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story, Episode 2". BBC Radio 2 (Interview). BBC. [the title] wasn't "Flashdance[…What a Feeling]". It was "Dancing for Your Life".
  21. ^ a b Bronson 2003, p. 573
  22. ^ Moroder, Giorgio (May 20, 2013). "Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story, Episode 2". BBC Radio 2 (Interview). BBC. I loved it. I feel the lyric, "what a feeling", sounds perfect for the movie.
  23. ^ Cara, Irene (May 20, 2013). "Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story, Episode 2". BBC Radio 2 (Interview). BBC. Giorgio came in and said, "Well, look, if you want it to be nominated, you better put the word Flashdance in there somewhere." So, uh, which we never quite did. We just kind of put the word "in a flash it takes hold of your heart" was the best we could do. We couldn’t actually just say Flashdance. It didn’t work in anything to say Flashdance.
  24. ^ Lichtman, Irv (August 6, 1983). "Paramount Pictures Works To Help Sell Soundtracks". Billboard. New York: Billboard Publications, Inc. p. 55.
  25. ^ "Flashdance...What a Feeling - Irene Cara - Custom Backing Track". Karaoke Version. Retrieved June 28, 2017.
  26. ^ "Irene Cara 'Flashdance What a Feeling' Sheet Music". Musicnotes.com. Alfred Publishing. Retrieved June 27, 2021.
  27. ^ "'Good Old Disco' Still Works for Moroder". Billboard. New York: Billboard Publications, Inc. October 29, 1983. p. 6.
  28. ^ "'Good Old Disco' Still Works for Moroder". Billboard. New York: Billboard Publications, Inc. October 29, 1983. p. 6. I would have liked him to do the song for the film, but the film company wanted to have a bigger name.
  29. ^ Wuench, Kevin (June 18, 2013). "Remember that 'other' song from the 'Flashdance' soundtrack? ... Me neither". Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved January 27, 2019. Little known is that Esposito recorded the original version of 'Flashdance… What a Feeling', but the song was rerecorded by Irene Cara after the producers thought the song should be sung from the female perspective.
  30. ^ Kawashima, Dale (May 24, 2018). "Special Interview With Pop Legend Irene Cara, Co-Writer & Singer Of The #1 Hit "Flashdance…What a Feeling" And Star Of The Movie, Fame". songwriteruniverse.com. songwriteruniverse.com. Retrieved April 16, 2020. And I said, 'Well, you know, I’m not in this movie. I’ll agree to sing the theme song if I also write it.'
  31. ^ Moroder, Giorgio (May 20, 2013). "Electric Dreams: The Giorgio Moroder Story, Episode 2". BBC Radio 2 (Interview). BBC.
  32. ^ "Legendary Producer Giorgio Moroder Talks DJ'ing Advice From David Guetta and His Love For The Weeknd". Eldridge Industries. Retrieved December 28, 2019. With Irene, I personally knew exactly what to do, but sometimes the artist will say, 'I want to redo it,' and you can’t say, 'No, no, you can't.' The second time, I don’t think she improved it that much, but the third time, especially towards the ending, she brought in more emotion and it elevated it.
  33. ^ a b Bruckheimer, Jerry (2010). Flashdance: Music and Songs (bonus feature from Flashdance, Special Collector's Edition) (DVD). Paramount.
  34. ^ Rosen 1996, p. 275: 'It was an easy one to record,' Moroder says. 'It only took two or three days, and we had a very good response from Paramount.'
  35. ^ "Billboard's Top Single Picks—Pop". Billboard. New York: Billboard Publications, Inc. April 2, 1983. p. 55.
  36. ^ "News & Reviews: Singles – Black Contemporary". Cashbox. New York: Cash Box Publishing Co., Inc. April 2, 1983. p. 8.
  37. ^ Rockwell, John (May 1, 1983). "Film Scores On Disks". Section 2. The New York Times. New York. p. 23.
  38. ^ Canale 1986, p. 148.
  39. ^ "Flashdance – Original Soundtrack". Allmusic. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  40. ^ "What a Feelin' – Irene Cara". Allmusic. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  41. ^ "Casablanca Records Story – Various Artists". Allmusic. Retrieved May 23, 2021.
  42. ^ Ressner, Jeffrey (May 7, 1983). "Polygram Gears Up Push For Flashdance LP". Cashbox. New York: Cash Box Publishing Co., Inc. p. 10.
  43. ^ Hall & Neale 2010, p. 216: Paramount followed the usual route of releasing the title track as a scout single succeeded by the release of the soundtrack album thereafter.
  44. ^ White 1990, p. 40.
  45. ^ Smith 1999, p. 49: Since 1960, the conventional wisdom about soundtracks is that they should be released about four to six weeks before the film's general release in order to give the music an opportunity to work its way up the charts and circulate the film's title in radio and retail markets. The same generally holds true for theme songs and music videos. In theory, a so-called scout single generates positive buzz for the film, which in turn creates consumer interest in the film's theme song and soundtrack album.
  46. ^ Eszterhas 2010, p. 171: "Paramount had so little faith in Flashdance that the studio sold off 30 percent of its own potential profit to a private investors group. We all knew, of course, that studios only did that with movies that they were absolutely certain would stiff."
  47. ^ Bruckheimer, Jerry (2010). Releasing the Flashdance Phenomenon (bonus feature from Flashdance, Special Collector's Edition) (DVD). Paramount.
  48. ^ Ressner, Jeffrey (May 7, 1983). "Polygram Gears Up Push For Flashdance LP". Cashbox. New York: Cash Box Publishing Co., Inc. p. 18. Retailers told us that every store in the country had sold out of every piece of Flashdance product.
  49. ^ Ressner, Jeffrey (May 7, 1983). "Polygram Gears Up Push For Flashdance LP". Cashbox. New York: Cash Box Publishing Co., Inc. p. 18. Paramount has enlisted Adrian Lyne, the director of the motion picture, to edit outtakes from the film into four music videos to be shown on MTV: Music Television, other youth-oriented cable shows, in-store at various record retail outlets and dance clubs. The quartet of videos highlights the songs "Manhunt," performed by Karen Kamon; "Imagination," by Laura Branigan; "Maniac," belted out by Michael Sembello; and Cara's title tune.
  50. ^ Ressner, Jeffrey (May 7, 1983). "Polygram Gears Up Push For Flashdance LP". Cashbox. New York: Cash Box Publishing Co., Inc. p. 18.
  51. ^ Whitburn 2000, p. 461
  52. ^ a b Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970–1992 (illustrated ed.). St Ives, N.S.W.: Australian Chart Book. p. 54. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.
  53. ^ a b "Top RPM Singles: Issue 6299." RPM. Library and Archives Canada. Retrieved January 23, 2018.
  54. ^ a b "Hits of the World" (PDF). Billboard. Vol. 95 no. 38. September 17, 1983. p. 78. ISSN 0006-2510 – via World Radio History.
  55. ^ a b >オリジナルコンフィデンス. 歴代洋楽シングル売り上げ枚数ランキング (in Japanese). 年代流行. Retrieved October 29, 2017.
  56. ^ a b "Irene Cara – Flashdance ...What a Feeling". Top 40 Singles. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  57. ^ a b "Irene Cara – Flashdance ...What a Feeling". VG-lista. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  58. ^ a b "SA Charts 1965–1989 (As presented on Springbok Radio/Radio Orion) – Acts C". The South African Rock Encyclopedia. Archived from the original on September 1, 2018. Retrieved September 1, 2018.
  59. ^ a b Salaverrie, Fernando (September 2005). Sólo éxitos: año a año, 1959–2002 (in Spanish) (1st ed.). Madrid: Fundación Autor/SGAE. ISBN 84-8048-639-2.
  60. ^ a b "Irene Cara – Flashdance ...What a Feeling". Singles Top 100. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  61. ^ a b "Irene Cara – Flashdance ...What a Feeling". Swiss Singles Chart. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  62. ^ a b "Irene Cara – Flashdance ...What a Feeling" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  63. ^ a b Pennanen, Timo (2006). Sisältää hitin – levyt ja esittäjät Suomen musiikkilistoilla vuodesta 1972 (in Finnish) (1st ed.). Helsinki: Kustannusosakeyhtiö Otava. ISBN 978-951-1-21053-5.
  64. ^ a b "The Irish Charts – Search Results – Flashdance". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  65. ^ a b "Irene Cara: Artist Chart History". Official Charts Company. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  66. ^ a b "Offiziellecharts.de – Irene Cara – Flashdance ...What a Feeling". GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  67. ^ Whitburn 2007, p. 41.
  68. ^ Whitburn 2004a, p. 102.
  69. ^ Whitburn 2004b, p. 50.
  70. ^ a b "American single certifications – Irene Cara – Flashdance". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved August 31, 2020.
  71. ^ a b "British single certifications – Irene Cara – Flashdance". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved August 31, 2020.
  72. ^ a b "Canadian single certifications – Irene Cara – Flashdance". Music Canada. Retrieved November 25, 2020.
  73. ^ a b Fujita, Shig (January 21, 1984). "International Repertoire Explosion Keys Upturn in Japanese Market" (PDF). Billboard. p. 9. Retrieved November 2, 2020.
  74. ^ a b "Les Certifications depuis 1973: Singles". Infodisc.fr. Retrieved August 31, 2020. (In the box labeled "Choisir Un Artiste Dans la Liste", type the letter "I". Arrow down the list to "Irene Cara" and click OK.)
  75. ^ Trenz, John (August 8, 2014). 'Insubordinate' Looking: Consumerism, Power And Identity And The Art Of Popular (Music) Dance Movies (PDF) (PhD). University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved June 11, 2021. We follow Alex to the steel mill where she works as welder. However, the film has not yet formally introduced Alex as a character. No representational communication within the film’s diegesis has taken place. Communication only takes place through the sequence of images set to the song, which is personifying the images.
  76. ^ Trenz, John (August 8, 2014). 'Insubordinate' Looking: Consumerism, Power And Identity And The Art Of Popular (Music) Dance Movies (PDF) (PhD). University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved June 11, 2021. The song is still playing over the sequence and the interior of the mill seems to pulse with mechanical machinery to the rhythm, reflecting, in physical form, the symbolic significance of the lyrics, "In a world made of steel, made of stone".
  77. ^ a b Trenz, John (August 8, 2014). 'Insubordinate' Looking: Consumerism, Power And Identity And The Art Of Popular (Music) Dance Movies (PDF) (PhD). University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved June 11, 2021.
  78. ^ Kalinak, Kathryn (February 1984). "Flashdance: The dead end kid". Jump Cut (29): 3–5. Retrieved May 30, 2021. But interestingly enough for the women who perform it, flashdancing constitutes a kind of non-performance. Ignoring the audience, they dance for each other and for themselves. Alex(andra) is embarrassed when her boyfriend, Nick, catches her dancing in an unguarded moment, but the ogling at Mawby's leaves her unfazed
  79. ^ Kalinak, Kathryn (February 1984). "Flashdance: The dead end kid". Jump Cut (29): 3–5. Retrieved May 30, 2021. 'I never see them. You go out there, and the music starts, and you begin to feel it. And your body just starts to move. I know it sounds really silly. But something inside you just clicks, and you just take off. You're gone. It's like you're somebody else for a second.' Echoing the lyrics of the film's title song, 'Flashdance… What a Feeling,' Alex celebrates the physical liberation of the dance: 'When I hear the music, Close my eyes, feel the rhythm Wrap around, take ahold of my heart, What a feeling!'
  80. ^ Trenz, John (August 8, 2014). 'Insubordinate' Looking: Consumerism, Power And Identity And The Art Of Popular (Music) Dance Movies (PDF) (PhD). University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved June 11, 2021. In a sense, Alex is finally reflected in the movie as the interpreter of her own story (her song) through dancing. The song remains the same as it was in the opening sequence but the reflection of the image is defined by the physical expression of her body in dance.
  81. ^ Trenz, John (August 8, 2014). 'Insubordinate' Looking: Consumerism, Power And Identity And The Art Of Popular (Music) Dance Movies (PDF) (PhD). University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved June 11, 2021. From the position of the selection committee, Alex gives presence to the song as art, and therefore, they see it as non-representational. But it also signifies Alex’s ability to be evaluated as a real dancer.
  82. ^ Trenz, John (August 8, 2014). 'Insubordinate' Looking: Consumerism, Power And Identity And The Art Of Popular (Music) Dance Movies (PDF) (PhD). University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved June 11, 2021. Because she is dancing as herself rather than as a character in a show, the song is also representational of her story for the film audience.
  83. ^ Trenz, John (August 8, 2014). 'Insubordinate' Looking: Consumerism, Power And Identity And The Art Of Popular (Music) Dance Movies (PDF) (PhD). University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved June 11, 2021. Alex’s performance signifies 'Flashdance' as representational of her story rather than as a track exclusive to the movie and which its producers are selling to the audience.
  84. ^ Trenz, John (August 8, 2014). 'Insubordinate' Looking: Consumerism, Power And Identity And The Art Of Popular (Music) Dance Movies (PDF) (PhD). University of Pittsburgh. Retrieved June 11, 2021.
  85. ^ a b c Needham 2016, p. 322.
  86. ^ Needham 2016, p. 322: The gradual acceleration and momentum of this scene in terms of performance, music and editing and the fact that it does not even have to be spoken that she has won over the conservatory make for a truly uplifting moment that takes the audience to the giddy highs of plenitude.
  87. ^ Needham 2016, p. 322: The "true" ending of Flashdance is the point at which we realize Alex has won over the audition panel with her energetic performance to "What a Feeling." The music at this point is established as diegetic, since Alex brings along the record and we see her play it as part of her audition.
  88. ^ Needham 2016, p. 322: In a single cut we see Alex run out of the Conservatory and into the waiting arms of Nick, and only then does the film end on a freeze-frame of the couple and the credits begin. It is in that single cut from interior to exterior, from audition to romance, from the loss of an independent life to one of coupledom and financial dependence where Flashdance does make its politics known.
  89. ^ "Irene Cara/Felony". American Bandstand. Season 26. Episode 28. April 30, 1983.
  90. ^ "Marilyn McCoo & Rex Smith Show 30". Solid Gold. Season 3. Episode 30. April 30, 1983.
  91. ^ "Solid Gold Countdown 83". Solid Gold. Season 4. Episode 53. February 15, 1984.
  92. ^ Cara, Irene (May 31, 2013). "Irene Cara – Flashdance 1983 – What A Feeling". YouTube. Google LLC. Retrieved May 27, 2021.
  93. ^ "11th Annual American Music Awards". American Music Awards. January 16, 1984. ABC.
  94. ^ O'Neil 1999, p. 361.
  95. ^ Wiley & Bona 1996, p. 638.
  96. ^ Boyd, Michael (September 8, 1984). "Talent In Action: Irene Cara". Billboard. New York: Billboard Publications, Inc. p. 51.
  97. ^ O'Neil 1999, p. 362.
  98. ^ a b O'Neil 1999, p. 361.
  99. ^ O'Neil 1999, pp. 367–368.
  100. ^ Wiley & Bona 1996, p. 1143.
  101. ^ O'Neil 2003, p. 474.
  102. ^ "BAFTA 1984: British Academy Film Awards (Movies from 1983)". Retrieved March 6, 2020.
  103. ^ "11th American Music Awards". Retrieved March 4, 2020.
  104. ^ "The Top 10 Soundtrack Songs". Billboard. New York: Billboard Publications, Inc. September 19, 1998. p. 36.
  105. ^ "The Billboard Hot 100 All-Time Top Songs (30-21)". billboard.com. Billboard. Archived from the original on September 13, 2008. Retrieved June 27, 2021.
  106. ^ Portwood, Jerry; Ehrlich, David; Fear, David. "20 Greatest Best Song Oscar Performances". rollingstone.com. Rolling Stone. Retrieved March 7, 2020.
  107. ^ Tschinkel, Arielle (June 19, 2018). "35 of the most iconic movie songs of all time". insider.com. Insider Inc. Retrieved March 5, 2020.
  108. ^ "Hot 100 Turns 60". billboard.com. Billboard Publications, Inc. Retrieved March 4, 2020.
  109. ^ "Greatest of All Time Hot 100 Songs by Women". billboard.com. Billboard Publications, Inc. Archived from the original on November 13, 2019. Retrieved March 8, 2020.
  110. ^ a b c Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 89
  111. ^ Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 89: When Cara finally realized she wasn't getting paid for her first album or for the Flashdance soundtrack,… she decided to speak up.
  112. ^ Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 93: in the years with Coury, a period that included the recording of Anyone Can See and What a Feelin', she had been paid a total of $183 in royalties.
  113. ^ Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 89: Cara consulted her agent and hired a team of entertainment lawyers… She wanted her share of the record-sales profits that were stipulated in her contract with Coury, and she wanted to leave Network Records.
  114. ^ a b c d Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 95
  115. ^ Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 90: He—they—made sure there were consequences. Big time. Coury and all his mogul buddies. He basically made sure I'd never record again. They blacklisted me.
  116. ^ Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 90: They sent out letters to all the labels saying they were in a legal battle with me and don't dare sign her.
  117. ^ Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 91: Film producers wouldn't return her calls… 'Casting people who once adored me now quickly escorted me out of their offices,' she says. 'Restaurants and hangout spots I frequented and felt comfortable in now looked at me with disdain.'
  118. ^ Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 91: Rumors swirled mercilessly about rampant drug use, spreading the notion that, in her early twenties, this great talent already had been hollowed out.
  119. ^ Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 92: After his Network Records began to founder, Coury went to work for the record label owned by David Geffen, one of the most powerful people in the entertainment business, and Cara became convinced that Coury had enlisted Geffen in his vendetta against her.
  120. ^ Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 90: The phalanx of entertainment lawyers she hired decided not to make a case for fraud, arguing instead that Network was not a functioning label.
  121. ^ a b c d Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 93
  122. ^ Guinn & Perry 2005, p. 94.
  123. ^ Kawashima, Dale (May 24, 2018). "Special Interview With Pop Legend Irene Cara, Co-Writer & Singer Of The #1 Hit 'Flashdance…What a Feeling' And Star Of The Movie Fame". songwriteruniverse.com. Retrieved January 30, 2021.
  124. ^ What a Feelin' (CD booklet). Irene Cara. Pointe Claire, Quebec, Canada: Unidisc Music. 1997. SPLK-7299.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  125. ^ "Irene Cara – Flashdance ...What a Feeling" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  126. ^ "Nederlandse Top 40 – Irene Cara" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  127. ^ "Irene Cara – Flashdance ...What a Feeling" (in Dutch). Single Top 100. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  128. ^ "Irene Cara Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  129. ^ "Irene Cara Chart History (Adult Contemporary)". Billboard. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  130. ^ "Irene Cara Chart History (Dance Club Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  131. ^ "Irene Cara Chart History (Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  132. ^ "Cash Box Top 100 Singles – Week ending May 28, 1983". Cash Box. Archived from the original on September 11, 2012. Retrieved September 3, 2018.
  133. ^ "The Cash Box Top 100 Black Contemporary – Week ending July 30, 1983". Cash Box. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  134. ^ "National Top 100 Singles for 1983". Kent Music Report (497). January 2, 1984 – via Imgur.
  135. ^ "Jahreshitparade Singles 1983". austriancharts.at (in German). Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  136. ^ "The Top Singles of 1983". RPM. Vol. 39 no. 17. December 24, 1983. p. 10. ISSN 0315-5994 – via Library and Archives Canada.
  137. ^ "Top Selling Singles of 1983". Recorded Music NZ. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  138. ^ "Top 20 Hit Singles of 1983". The South African Rock Encyclopedia. Retrieved December 26, 2018.
  139. ^ "Scweizer Jahrehitparade 1983". hitparade.ch (in German). Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  140. ^ "Top 50 Singles of 1983". Music Week. London. December 25, 1983. p. 25. ISSN 0265-1548.
  141. ^ a b c d "Talent Almanac 1984 – Top Pop Singles / Top Black Singles / Top Adult Contemporary Singles / Top Dance/Disco Singles/Albums" (PDF). Billboard. Vol. 95 no. 52. December 24, 1983. pp. TA-18, TA-22, TA-26. ISSN 0006-2510 – via World Radio History.
  142. ^ "The Cash Box Year-End Charts: 1983 – Top 100 Pop Singles". Cash Box. December 31, 1983. Archived from the original on September 22, 2012. Retrieved September 3, 2018.
  143. ^ "The Cash Box Year-End Charts: 1983 – Top 100 Black Contemporary Singles". Cash Box. December 31, 1983. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  144. ^ "Top 100 Single-Jahrescharts – 1983" (in German). Offizielle Deutsche Charts. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  145. ^ "Hot 100 60th Anniversary Chart". Billboard. Retrieved August 6, 2018.
  146. ^ "Danish single certifications – Irene Cara – Flashdance". IFPI Danmark. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  147. ^ Marinella Venegoni (October 23, 1983). "Flashdance, un cocktail che ha bloccato Travolta". La Stampa. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  148. ^ "Italian single certifications – Irene Cara – Flashdance (What a Feeling)" (in Italian). Federazione Industria Musicale Italiana. Retrieved August 31, 2020. Select "2019" in the "Anno" drop-down menu. Select "Flashdance (What a Feeling)" in the "Filtra" field. Select "Singoli" under "Sezione".
  149. ^ Ryan, Gavin (2011). Australia's Music Charts 1988–2010. Mt. Martha, VIC, Australia: Moonlight Publishing.
  150. ^ "Marcia Hines – What a Feeling". Top 40 Singles. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  151. ^ "Global Deejays – What a Feeling (Flashdance)". ARIA Top 50 Singles.
  152. ^ "ARIA Dance – Week Commencing 25th July 2005" (PDF). The ARIA Report (804): 13. July 25, 2005. Retrieved January 24, 2021 – via National Library of Australia.
  153. ^ "Global Deejays – What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40.
  154. ^ "Global Deejays – What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50.
  155. ^ "Global Deejays – What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (in French). Ultratop 50.
  156. ^ Global Deejays — What a Feeling (Flashdance). Tophit. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  157. ^ "Oficiální Česká Hitparáda – Pro týden 34/2005" (in Czech). IFPI ČR. Archived from the original on August 30, 2005. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  158. ^ "Global Deejays – What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (in French). Les classement single.
  159. ^ "Global Deejays – What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved March 3, 2020.
  160. ^ "Archívum – Slágerlisták – MAHASZ" (in Hungarian). Dance Top 40 lista. Magyar Hanglemezkiadók Szövetsége. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  161. ^ "Global Deejays – What a Feeling (Flashdance)" (in Dutch). Single Top 100.
  162. ^ "Global Deejays – What A Feeling (Flashdance)" (in Dutch). Dutch Top 40. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  163. ^ "Global Deejays – What a Feeling (Flashdance)". Swiss Singles Chart.
  164. ^ "Лучшие песни и музыка за 2005 год" (in Russian). Tophit. Archived from the original on October 6, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  165. ^ "Tops de L'Année | Top Singles – 2005" (in French). Syndicat National de l'Édition Phonographique. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  166. ^ "Björn Again | full Official Chart History". Official Charts Company. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  167. ^ "DJ BoBo & Irene Cara – What A Feeling". hitparade.ch (in German).
  168. ^ "Priscilla – Cette vie nouvelle". lescharts.com (in French). Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  169. ^ "Marie Picasso – Flashdance ... What A Feeling". swedishcharts.com. Retrieved February 14, 2014.
  170. ^ "Jason Derulo – 'The Sky's The Limit'". BBC. November 19, 2010. Retrieved May 7, 2015.
  171. ^ Futterman, Erica (May 16, 2012). "'Glee' Recap: What a Feeling". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on July 1, 2021. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  172. ^ "Chart Log UK – 2012 + Weekly Updates + Sales 2012". Zobbel.de. Retrieved January 24, 2021.

Bibliography[edit]