Fletcher Construction

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Fletcher Construction
Subsidiary
IndustryConstruction
Founded1919
Headquarters,
New Zealand
Area served
New Zealand, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Tonga, American Samoa
ServicesConstruction
ParentFletcher Building
Websitewww.fletcherconstruction.co.nz

The Fletcher Construction Company Limited is a New Zealand construction company[1] and a subsidiary of Fletcher Building. It and Higgins Contractors Ltd make up the Construction division of Fletcher Building. Fletcher Construction is widely recognised in New Zealand, and has delivered various iconic projects including constructing the Auckland Sky Tower.

It has three main business units:

  • Building and interiors
  • South Pacific
  • Infrastructure

History[edit]

In 1908 James Fletcher senior, a builder and stonemason from Scotland, began a building business along with his brother William John Fletcher and Englishman Albert Morris. The firm was known as Fletcher and Morris and later became Fletcher Bros.[2] The first house they built together, in 1909, still stands and is open to the public in Dunedin.[3] The company itself was first registered as a limited liability company in 1919.

In 1925 the company headquarters was moved to Auckland, and in 1940 Fletcher Construction became a subsidiary of the Fletcher Holdings group, which listed on the share market that year.[2] In 1942, following the resignation of his father to help New Zealand's war effort, James Fletcher junior became managing director of the company. Fletcher junior placed a greater emphasis on the firms building products manufacturing divisions, with Fletcher Construction retaining the core construction business.[4]

In 1981, Fletcher Holdings merged with Challenge Corporation Ltd and Tasman Pulp Paper Ltd to form Fletcher Challenge. Fletcher Building was formed with the split of Fletcher Challenge in 2001.

Major projects[edit]

Major projects have included:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gibson, Anne (6 March 2006). "Red ink reins in builder Mainzeal". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 30 September 2011.
  2. ^ a b "University of Auckland Business History Project – Fletcher Challenge". University of Auckland. Retrieved 31 August 2007.
  3. ^ "The Fletcher House". The Fletcher Trust. Retrieved 1 September 2007.
  4. ^ Graeme Hunt (31 August 2007). "Sir James Fletcher, the mild-mannered man of steel". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 31 August 2007.
  5. ^ Building activity. Evening Post. 2 March 1939.
  6. ^ Te Papa Archived 15 August 2007 at the Wayback Machine (from the Fletcher Construction website. Retrieved 25 November 2007.)
  7. ^ Sky City Casino Archived 19 August 2007 at the Wayback Machine (from the Fletcher Construction website. Retrieved 25 November 2007.)
  8. ^ Sky Tower Archived 31 October 2007 at the Wayback Machine (from the Fletcher Construction website. Retrieved 25 November 2007.)
  9. ^ Westpac Stadium Archived 19 August 2007 at the Wayback Machine (from the Fletcher Construction website. Retrieved 25 November 2007.)
  10. ^ Manapouri Archived 19 August 2007 at the Wayback Machine (from the Fletcher Construction website. Retrieved 25 November 2007.)
  11. ^ Upper Harbour Bridge Archived 22 November 2007 at the Wayback Machine (from the Fletcher Construction website. Retrieved 25 November 2007.)
  12. ^ High-Tech Bridge Buildings Hits Fijie.nz magazine, IPENZ, July/August 2007, Page 21
  13. ^ Manukau Harbour Crossing, January 2009NZ Transport Agency newsletter. Retrieved 9 August 2009.
  14. ^ "Waterview Connection". from the Fletcher Construction website. Archived from the original on 2017-01-26.
  15. ^ "Fonterra Building". from the Fletcher Construction website. Archived from the original on 2017-01-26.
  16. ^ "Fergusson Wharf". from the Fletcher Construction website. Archived from the original on 2017-09-28.
  17. ^ "Hobson Bay Tunnel". from the Fletcher Construction website. Archived from the original on 2017-04-06.
  18. ^ "Momi Bay Resort". from the Fletcher Construction website. Archived from the original on 2017-01-26.
  19. ^ "Fiji Four Long Bridges Project". from the Fletcher Construction website. Archived from the original on 2017-01-26.

Further reading[edit]

  • Goldsmith, Paul (2009). Fletchers: A Centennial History of Fletcher Building (hardback). Auckland: Davia Ling Publishing. ISBN 978-1-877378-35-5.
  • Smith, Jack (2009). No Job Too Big: A History of Fletcher Construction, Volume I: 1909-1940 (hardback). Wellington: Steele Roberts. ISBN 978-1-877448-69-0.

External links[edit]