Nintendo GameCube technical specifications

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Nintendo originally offered a digital video output on early GameCube models. However, it was determined that less than one percent of users utilized the feature. The company eventually removed the option starting with model number DOL-101 of May 2004.[1] The console's technical specifications are as follows.[2][3][4]

IBM PowerPC "Gekko" processor
Nintendo GameCube optical storage disc
Details Source(s)
CPU
  • 485 MHz IBM superscalar out of order "Gekko" PowerPC CPU based on 750CXe and 750FX[citation needed]
  • 180 nm IBM six layer, copper-wire process, 43 mm² die with 4.9 watts disspiation
    • 1.8 V for logic and I/O
    • 27×27 mm PBGA package with 256 contacts
    • 6.35 million logic transistors and 18.6 million transistors total
  • Superscalar out-of-order execution
  • 4 stages long two integer ALUs: IU1 and IU2, 32-bit
  • 7 stages long floating point unit: 64-bit double precision FPU, usable as 2×32-bit SIMD for 1.9 single-precision GFLOPS performance, often found under the denomination "paired singles"
  • Branch Prediction Unit (BPU)
  • Load-Store Unit (LSU)
  • System Register Unit (SRU)
  • Memory Management Unit (MMU)
  • Branch Target Instruction Cache (BTIC)
  • CPU performance: 1125 DMIPS (Dhrystone 2.1)
  • SIMD instructions: PowerPC750 + roughly 50 new SIMD instructions, geared toward 3D graphics
  • On-chip cache - 64 kB 8-way associative L1 cache (32/32 kB instruction/data), 256 KB on-die, 2-way associative L2 cache
  • Front-side bus: 64-bit enhanced 60x bus to Flipper northbridge at 162 MHz clock with 1.3 GB/s peak bandwidth (32-bit address, 64-bit data bus)
[5][6]
GPU [5][6][10]
System Memory [6][11][10]
Audio
  • Audio processor integrated into Flipper: custom 81 MHz Macronix 16-bit DSP
    • Sampling frequency: 48 kHz
    • 64 simultaneous channels, ADPCM encoding
    • Instruction memory: 8 KB RAM, 8 KB ROM
    • Data memory: 8 KB RAM, 4 KB ROM
  • External audio RAM: 16 MB DRAM @ 81 MHz
    • Audio RAM bus: 8-bit
    • Audio RAM bus bandwidth: 81 MB/s[5]
    • CPU can read/write blocks from RAM to ARAM through DMA; ARAM can be used for miscellaneous low-bandwidth purposes[2]
  • Stereo output (may contain 5.1-channel surround via Dolby Pro Logic II)
[5][11]
Video Modes
  • 640×480 interlaced (480i) @ 60 Hz
  • 640×480 progressive scan (480p) @ 60 Hz (NTSC versions only)
  • 768×576 interlaced (576i) @ 50 Hz (PAL versions only)
[5]
Connectivity [5]
Storage
  • 8 cm miniDVD optical disc
    • 1.5 GB capacity
    • 16 Mbit/s–25 Mbit/s transfer rate operating in CAV mode
    • 128 ms average access time
  • Memory card
    • Capacities starting at 512 KB (59 save blocks)
    • 8 KB sectors
[5][11][12]
Other
  • Power supply
    • DC 12 volts
    • 3.25 A
  • Dimensions: 4.3 in (110 mm) (H) × 5.9 in (150 mm) (W) × 6.3 in (160 mm) (D)
[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nintendo's GameCube Component FAQ page". Nintendo. Retrieved March 27, 2008. 
  2. ^ a b c "DCTP - Nintendo's Gamecube Technical Overview". Retrieved November 22, 2015. 
  3. ^ "Console Specs". Retrieved November 22, 2015. 
  4. ^ IGN Staff (November 4, 2000). "Gamecube Versus PlayStation 2". IGN. Retrieved November 22, 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h Shimpi, Anand Lal (December 7, 2001). "Hardware Behind the Consoles - Part II: Nintendo's GameCube". AnandTech. Retrieved July 9, 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c "Game Consoles: A Look Ahead". Ace's Hardware. December 14, 2003. Archived from the original on February 8, 2004. Retrieved March 27, 2008. 
  7. ^ a b c d Graphics Processor Specifications, IGN, 2001
  8. ^ IGN Staff (January 17, 2001). "GameCube 101: Graphics". IGN. Retrieved November 22, 2015. 
  9. ^ "cube.ign.com: X-ing Things Out". Archived from the original on January 23, 2001. Retrieved November 22, 2015. 
  10. ^ a b GameCube clears path for game developers, EE Times, 5/16/2001
  11. ^ a b c d "GCN Technical Specifications". Nintendo. Archived from the original on May 2, 2008. Retrieved March 28, 2008. 
  12. ^ "Nintendo GameCube Accessories". Nintendo. Retrieved July 3, 2009.  (dead)