Flocoumafen

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Flocoumafen
Flocoumafen.svg
Names
IUPAC name
2-Hydroxy-3-[3-[4-([4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methoxy)phenyl]-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl] chromen-4-one
Identifiers
90035-08-8 YesY
Jmol 3D model Interactive image
KEGG C18696 YesY
PubChem 91748
Properties
C33H25F3O4
Molar mass 542.54441
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Flocoumafen is an anticoagulant of the 4-hydroxycoumarin vitamin K antagonist type. It is a second generation (i.e., high potency) chemical in this class, used commercially as a rodenticide. It has a very high toxicity and is restricted to indoor use and sewers (in the UK). This restriction is mainly due to the increased risk to non-target species, especially due to its tendency to bio-accumulate in exposed organisms. Studies have shown that rodents resistant to first-generation anticoagulants can be adequately controlled with flocoumafen. It was synthesized in 1984 by Shell International Chemical.[1]

Toxicity[edit]

To most rodents LD50 is 1 mg/kg, but it can vary a lot between species: from 0.12 mg/kg: Microtus arvalis to more than 10 mg/kg Acomys cahirinus. For dogs: 0.075 - 0.25 mg/kg.[1]

Antidote[edit]

Antidote is vitamin K1.

References[edit]

See also[edit]