Scene (subculture)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Flogger (fashion))
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The scene subculture is a subculture that was common during the late 2000s and early–mid 2010s. Members of this subculture are called scene kids, scene people, or scenesters. Scene people are known for their fashion consisting of skinny jeans, bright colored clothing, and straight, flat hair with long bangs covering the forehead, sometimes with the hair being dyed colors like blond, pink, red, green, or bright blue. Scene people are known for listening to multiple types of music artists, specifically artists like crunkcore and electropop artists such as Blood on the Dance Floor and deathcore, electronicore and metalcore bands such as Bring Me the Horizon and Asking Alexandria.

The scene subculture began in the mid 2000s and became common during the late 2000s and early–mid 2010s. During the late 2000s and early–mid 2010s, scene fashion became common and music that scene people listen to achieved underground, moderate or mainstream success. Music artists like Bring Me the Horizon, Asking Alexandria, and Blood on the Dance Floor achieved moderate success while music artists like 3OH!3, Metro Station, Cobra Starship, and Owl City became extremely mainstream. In the late 2010s, the scene subculture declined. The scene subculture has been confused with the emo subculture.

Subculture[edit]

Fashion[edit]

Scene fashion consists of skinny jeans, bright colored clothing, ear gauges, sunglasses, piercings, shirts with neon colors, and straight, flat hair with long bangs covering the forehead and sometimes one of both eyes, with the hair sometimes being dyed colors like blond, pink, red, green, or bright blue.[1][2][3] According to The Guardian, a scene girl named Eve O'Brien described scene people as "happy emos".[3] Scene kids' hairstyles have caused scene fashion to be confused with emo fashion.[2]

Music[edit]

Scene people are known for listening to multiple kinds of music artists, specifically artists like Falling in Reverse, Brokencyde, Blood on the Dance Floor, The Bunny the Bear, Mayday Parade, Jeffree Star, Issues, Pierce the Veil, All Time Low, Bring Me the Horizon, For All Those Sleeping, Chunk! No, Captain Chunk!, Black Veil Brides, Eskimo Callboy, I See Stars, Attila, These Hearts, I Set My Friends on Fire, Enter Shikari, Family Force 5, Breathe Carolina, Restart, Attack Attack!, Abandon All Ships, The Devil Wears Prada, Lights, 3OH!3, Paramore, Asking Alexandria, Hey Monday, Cute Is What We Aim For, Millionaires, Iwrestledabearonce, Boys Like Girls, Sleeping with Sirens, Dance Gavin Dance, We Came As Romans, Jamie's Elsewhere, Metro Station, and Design the Skyline.[1][4][5][6][7][8][9][3][10][11]

History[edit]

Lee Malia of Bring Me the Horizon in 2007

The scene subculture began in the mid-2000s after the emo subculture became mainstream. During the mid-2000s, scene people were in the early deathcore music scene. In a 2005 article by Phoenix New Times, writer Chelsea Mueller described the appearance of the band Job for a Cowboy (a band that was deathcore at the time) by writing that the band "may look like scenesters with shaggy emo haircuts and tight pants, and may mock metal greats, but this death-metal band is for real."[5] Mueller described Job for a Cowboy as "five guys in girls' jeans and tight band tee shirts".[5] Another deathcore band, Bring Me the Horizon, was also involved in the early deathcore scene. Bring Me the Horizon is known for being listened to by scene people.[6] The band Blood on the Dance Floor was a followed by scene kids, especially from 2009 when Jayy Von Monroe joined as lead singer.[12]

According to an article by The Sydney Morning Herald from March 30, 2008, emo people have criticized the scene subculture with emo people accusing scene people of "ripping off their style".[2] During the late 2000s and early–mid 2010s, the scene subculture became a big subculture, with many music artists listened to by scene people achieving underground, moderate or mainstream success. Scene kids were hated by metalheads, who would refer to scene music artists as "shitcore", "emocore", or "mallcore". These metalheads were known for hating genres of heavy metal music that had names ending with "core".[13]

In the late 2010s, the scene subculture declined.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Palmer, Bobby (July 5, 2017). "The cringe things you'll remember if you were a scene kid in the mid-2000s". The Tab. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c Marcus, Caroline (March 30, 2008). "Inside the clash of the teen subcultures". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c Rogers, Jude (February 25, 2010). "From mod to emo: why pop tribes are still making a scene". The Guardian. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  4. ^ D, Sergeant (January 4, 2012). "2012 State of the Scene Address: It's Cool to Be Tr00". MetalSucks. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c Mueller, Chelsea (December 1, 2005). "Molten Rock". Phoenix New Times. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  6. ^ a b Rauf, Raziq (November 6, 2006). "Bring Me The Horizon: "It's just party music"". Drowned in Sound. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  7. ^ Jeffries, David. "Evolution - Blood on the Dance Floor". AllMusic. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  8. ^ Penn, Farrah (June 18, 2016). "34 Songs All Scene Kids Definitely Had On Their Myspace". BuzzFeed. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  9. ^ Shotwell, James (August 17, 2011). "Review: Design The Skyline - Nevaeh". Under the Gun Review. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  10. ^ Castillo, Arielle (February 29, 2012). "Download: Lights - "Toes (Woodhands Remix)"; Culture Room Show March 11". New Times Broward-Palm Beach. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  11. ^ Shotwell, James (July 15, 2011). "Review: Falling In Reverse - The Drug In Me Is You". Under the Gun Review. Retrieved July 30, 2018.
  12. ^ https://www.inkedmag.com/culture/you-wont-believe-what-this-blood-on-the-dance-floor-singer-does-today
  13. ^ Wilson, Scott A. (2015). Music at the Extremes: Essays on Sounds Outside the Mainstream. McFarland. pp. 20–21. ISBN 9780786494507.

External links[edit]