Florida Women's Hall of Fame

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Zora Neale Hurston beating a Haitian tambour maman or mama drum

The Florida Women's Hall of Fame is an honor roll of women who have contributed to life for citizens of Florida. An awards ceremony for the hall of fame was first held in 1982 and recipient names are displayed in the Florida State Capitol. The program was created by an act of the Florida Legislature and is overseen by the Florida Commission on the Status of Women (FCSW), a nonpartisan board created in 1991 to study and "make recommendations to the Governor, Cabinet and Legislature on issues affecting women". The FCSW also manages the Florida Achievement Award for those who have improved the lives of women and girls in Florida, an award is focused on outstanding volunteerism. FCSW members serve by appointment and the commission is housed at the Office of the Attorney General of Florida.[1]

History[edit]

President John F. Kennedy set up the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women (PCSW) in 1961, and in 1964 Florida Governor Farris Bryant created the Governor's Commission on the Status of Women (COSW) "to study laws and regulations pertaining to women in Florida and make recommendations to the legislature based on their findings." The Florida Women's Hall of Fame was enacted by the state legislature. Florida Statutes, Title XVIII Public Lands and Property, Chapter 265 Memorials, Museums and Arts and Culture, section 265.001 Florida Women's Hall of Fame, sets the parameters within which the hall of fame operates.[2] In 1982, the first Florida Women's Hall of Fame ceremony and reception was held by COSW at the Florida Governor's Mansion in Tallahassee.[3][4]

Overview[edit]

The purpose of the Florida Women's Hall of Fame, according to the intention expressed in the actual Florida Statute, is "to recognize and honor those women who, through their works and lives, have made significant contributions to the improvement of life for women and for all citizens of Florida".[5]

Each year, women from Florida, or who have adopted it as their home state, are nominated for induction. The governor of Florida decides on the final three nominees from a shortlist of ten nominees.[6] The rotunda of the Florida State Capitol building has a permanent display of photos of Florida Women's Hall of Fame inductees.[7]

Several other states have a Hall of Fame for notable women, including Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Maryland, Ohio and Texas.[8] The United States' National Women's Hall of Fame is based in Seneca Falls, New York.

Florida Women's Hall of Fame inductees[edit]

Florida Women's Hall of Fame
Name Image Birth–Death Year Area of achievement Ref(s)
Barnett, Carol JenkinsCarol Jenkins Barnett (b. 1956) 2016 President of Publix Super Markets Charities, Inc. [9]
Ferré, Helen AguirreHelen Aguirre Ferré (b. 1957) 2016 Journalist [10]
Leto, Elmira LouiseElmira Louise Leto (b. 1949) 2016 Founder and CEO of Samuel’s House, Inc., an agency to provide housing to the homeless [11]
Farrior, Mary LeeMary Lee Farrior (b. 1937) 2015 Coca-Cola heir from Tampa who gave $1 million to start Mary Lee's House, a center combining facilities for child abuse prevention, assessment, forensics and counseling [12]
Keiser, Evelyn CahnEvelyn Cahn Keiser (b. 1924) 2015 Co-founded the Keiser School in 1977 [13]
Maguire, Charlotte E.Charlotte E. Maguire (1918–2014) 2015 First woman physician in Orlando, founded one of the first pediatric clinics in Florida [14]
Benton, SusanSusan Benton (b. 1949) 2014 Sheriff of Highlands County, Florida; 2013 President of the Florida Sheriff’s Association; first female sheriff elected in a general election in Florida history [15]
Gopher, Louise JonesLouise Jones Gopher (b. 1945) 2014 First woman from the Seminole Tribe of Florida to earn a college degree [16]
MacKinnon, Dottie BergerDottie Berger MacKinnon (1942–2013) 2014 Founder of Joshua House, advocate for women and children [17]
Frye, Clara C.Clara C. Frye (1872–1936) 2013 African American nurse in Tampa, Florida who established the Clara Frye Hospital [18]
MacKenzie, Aleene Pridgen KiddAleene Pridgen Kidd MacKenzie (1921–2013) 2013 Assistant Director of Development at Florida State University, first Chair of the Governor’s Commission on the Status of Women [19]
Voss, Lillie PierceLillie Pierce Voss (1876–1967) 2013 Writer and early pioneer; interacted with the Seminole Indians as a child, earning the nickname "Sweetheart of the Barefoot Mailmen" [20]
Alexander, Ruth H.Ruth H. Alexander (b. 1938) 2012 Established the "Lady Gator Athletic" program [21]
Burke, Vicki BryantVicki Bryant Burke (b. 1953) 2012 Social worker, juvenile justice system [22]
Bell, Elizabeth "Budd"Elizabeth "Budd" Bell (1915–2009) 2012 Social worker [23]
Karl, Mary BrennanMary Brennan Karl (1890–1948) 2011 Education pioneer whose efforts were a foundation of what later became Daytona Beach Junior College [24]
Rodriguez, Anna I.Anna I. Rodriguez (b. 1957) 2011 Founder Florida Coalition Against Human Trafficking [25]
Clark, EugenieEugenie Clark (1922–2015) 2010 Ichthyologist [26]
Ryce, Claudine DianneClaudine Dianne Ryce (1943–2009) 2010 Advocate for missing children [27]
Torres, Dara GraceDara Grace Torres Dara Torres 2crop.jpg (b. 1961) 2010 Olympic gold-silver-bronze medalist swimmer [28]
Courtelis, Louise H.Louise H. Courtelis (b. 1932) 2009 Philanthropist [29]
Margolis, GwenGwen Margolis Gwen Margolis.jpeg (b. 1934) 2009 Member of Florida Senate [30]
Sembler, Betty SchlesingerBetty Schlesinger Sembler (b. 1931) 2009 Anti-drug activist and wife of Ambassadress Mel Sembler, with whom she co-founded the drug treatment program Straight, Incorporated [31]
Pariente, Barbara J.Barbara J. Pariente Barbara Pariente.jpg (b. 1948) 2008 Former Chief Justice Florida Supreme Court [32]
Patel, PallaviPallavi Patel (b. 1950) 2008 Pediatrician, philanthropist who with her husband co-founded Carousel Elephants, the Patel Foundation for Global Understanding [33]
Ros-Lehtinen, IleanaIleana Ros-Lehtinen Ileana Ros-Lehtinen Congressional Portrait.jpg (b. 1952) 2008 U.S. RepresentativeHouse Committee on Foreign Affairs [34]
Peck, Maryly VanLeerMaryly VanLeer Peck (1930–2011) 2007 President of Polk Community College1982–1997 [35]
Quince, Peggy A.Peggy A. Quince PQuince.jpg (b. 1948) 2007 Justice and former Chief Justice Supreme Court of Florida [36]
Asensio, CaridadCaridad Asensio (1931–2011) 2006 Farm worker advocate, founder Caridad Asensio Health Clinic, providing free health care for farm workers [37]
Fowler, Tillie KiddTillie Kidd Fowler TillieKFowler.jpg (1942–2005) 2006 United States House of Representatives [38]
Morgan, Lucy W.Lucy W. Morgan (b. 1940) 2006 Journalist [39]
Coletti, Shirley D.Shirley D. Coletti (b. 1935) 2005 Co-founder of substance abuse program Operation PAR, Inc [40]
Kersey, JudithJudith Kersey (b. 1943) 2005 Scientist, worked as an engineer in America's space program [41]
Hammer, Marion P.Marion P. Hammer (b. 1939) 2005 First female President of National Rifle Association [42]
Blocker, Sarah AnnSarah Ann Blocker (1857–1944) 2003 co-founder of Florida Memorial College [43]
Estefan, GloriaGloria Estefan Gloria Estefan 2009 White House.jpg (b. 1957) 2003 Entertainer [44]
Grizzle, Mary R.Mary R. Grizzle (1921–2006) 2003 Legislator, advocate of the Equal Rights Amendment; served in both houses of the Florida state legislature. At the end of her career as a representative, she was the longest-serving member of the legislature. She helped pass bills on waste water clean-up and on married women attaining full property rights without a husband's permission. [45]
Ely, Victoria JoyceVictoria Joyce Ely (1889–1979) 2002 First licensed midwife in Florida; served in the Army Nurse Corpsduring World War I; pioneer in Florida nursing care [46]
Jennings, ToniToni Jennings Toni Jennings2.jpg (b. 1949) 2002 16th (and first female) Lieutenant Governor of Florida [47]
Langford Stuart, FrancesFrances Langford Stuart Frances Langford in This Is The Army.jpg (1913–2005) 2002 Entertainer [48]
duPont, Jessie BallJessie Ball duPont Jessiedupont.jpg (1884–1970) 2001 Philanthropist [49]
Keever, LyndaLynda Keever (b. 1947) 2001 Publisher, CEO Florida Trend Magazine [50]
Nesbitt, Lenore CarreroLenore Carrero Nesbitt (1932–2001) 2001 Nominated by President Ronald Reaganto a Federal judgeship [51]
Evert, ChrisChris Evert Chris Evert.jpg (b. 1954) 2000 Tennis pro [52]
Hawkins, PaulaPaula Hawkins Hawkins, Paula.jpg (1927–2003) 2000 First Florida female elected to the United States Senate [53]
Mathewson-Chapman, MarianneMarianne Mathewson-Chapman (b. 1948) 2000 First woman in the Army National Guardto attain rank of Major General [54]
Gibson, AltheaAlthea Gibson Althea Gibson NYWTS.jpg (1927–2003) 1999 Champion tennis player, a pioneering African-American in the sport [55]
O'Laughlin, Sister JeanneSister Jeanne O'Laughlin (b. 1929) 1999 First president of Barry University [56]
Prescott, Dessie SmithDessie Smith Prescott (1906–2002) 1999 First licensed female pilot in Florida, served in the Women's Army Corpsin World War II, first female professional guide in Florida [57]
Davis, HelenHelen Davis (1926–2015) 1998 Florida state legislator, social activist [58]
Davis, Mattie BelleMattie Belle Davis (1910–2004) 1998 Jurist who helped establish the Florida Association of Women Lawyers [59]
Fulwylie-Bankston, ChristineChristine Fulwylie-Bankston (1916–1998) 1998 Poet, social activist, civil rights [60]
Baro, AliciaAlicia Baro (1918–2012) 1997 Social and political activist [61]
Corse, Carita DoggettCarita Doggett Corse (1891–1978) 1997 Florida director of Federal Writers' Project [62]
Range, M. AthalieM. Athalie Range M Athalie Range.jpg (1916–2006) 1997 Political activist, first African-American and second woman elected to the Miami City Council [63]
Carr, Marjorie HarrisMarjorie Harris Carr Marjorie Harris Carr.jpg (1915–1998) 1996 Conservationist [64]
Castor, BettyBetty Castor Betty Castor.jpg (b. 1941) 1996 Former president of USF, member of J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board [65]
Stranahan, Ivy Julia CromartieIvy Julia Cromartie Stranahan (1881–1971) 1996 Women's suffrage, social activist, environmental activist, helped Seminole tribe move to the Dania reservation [66]
Crosslin, Evelyn StockingEvelyn Stocking Crosslin (1919–1991) 1995 Physician [67]
Morgan, JoAnn HardinJoAnn Hardin Morgan JoAnn Hardin Morgan.jpg (b. 1940) 1995 First female engineer at NASA, first woman senior executive at Kennedy Space Center [68]
Pryor, Sarah BrooksSarah Brooks Pryor (1877–1972) 1995 Civic activist, historic preservationist, known affectionately as "Aunt Frances" [69]
Beare, NikkiNikki Beare (1928–2014) 1994 Political and social activist, supported the Equal Rights Amendment [70]
Jumper, Betty Mae TigerBetty Mae Tiger Jumper Betty Mae Tiger Jumper.jpg (1923–2011) 1994 First female chief of Seminole Tribe of Florida [71]
Milton, Gladys NicholsGladys Nichols Milton (1924–1999) 1994 Advocated midwives be recognized as medical practitioners [72]
Erde, Betty Skelton FrankmanBetty Skelton Frankman Erde Betty Skelton Frankman (later Erde).jpg (1926–2011) 1993 Aerobatics championship aviator [73]
Pedroso, PaulinaPaulina Pedroso (1845–1925) 1993 Activist in the Cuban War of Independence [74]
Reno, JanetJanet Reno Janet Reno-us-Portrait.jpg (b. 1941) 1993 Former Attorney General of the United States [75]
Cochran, JacquelineJacqueline Cochran Jacqueline Cochran 1943.jpg (1910–1980) 1992 Aviator [76]
Meek, Carrie P.Carrie P. Meek Carrie P. Meek.jpg (b. 1926) 1992 United States House of Representatives [77]
Owen, Ruth BryanRuth Bryan Owen Ruth Bryan Owen.jpg (1885–1954) 1992 Florida's first female in the U.S. Congress, U.S. Ambassador to Denmark, appointed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt; daughter of William Jennings Bryan [78]
Ackerman, AnnieAnnie Ackerman (1914–1989) 1986 Political activist [79]
Barkett, RosemaryRosemary Barkett Rosemary Barkett.jpg (b. 1939) 1986 Judge, U.S. Court of Appeals, appointed by President Bill Clinton [80]
Cherry, GwenGwen Cherry (1923–1979) 1986 Lawyer and legislator who introduced into the legislature the Equal Rights Amendment, Martin Luther King state holiday [81]
Dodd, DorothyDorothy Dodd (1902–1994) 1986 Florida state archivist and state librarian [82]
Douglas, Marjory StonemanMarjory Stoneman Douglas Marjory S Douglas Friends photo.jpg (1890–1998) 1986 Evergladespreservationist [83]
Hare, Elsie JonesElsie Jones Hare (1903–1985) 1986 Educator [84]
Johnson, Elizabeth McCulloughElizabeth McCullough Johnson Beth Johnson Senate portrait.jpg (1909–1973) 1986 Florida State Representative and Senator [85]
Kinne, Frances BartlettFrances Bartlett Kinne 1986 Educator, academic [86]
McCabe, Arva Moore ParksArva Moore Parks McCabe (b. 1939) 1986 Author, filmmaker [87]
Rawlings, Marjorie KinnanMarjorie Kinnan Rawlings Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings.jpg (1896–1953) 1986 Author, won the Pulitzer Prize for The Yearling [88]
Seibert, Florence BarbaraFlorence Barbara Seibert Florence Barbara Seibert (1897-1991).jpg (1897–1991) 1986 Biochemist, inventor of the standard tuberculosistest [89]
Smith, Marilyn K.Marilyn K. Smith (1936–1985) 1986 Volunteerism [90]
White, Eartha M. M.Eartha M. M. White (1876–1974) 1986 Humanitarian and educator who founded the Clara White Mission and the Eartha M.M. White Nursing Home [91]
Bolton, Roxcy O'NealRoxcy O'Neal Bolton Roxcy Bolton with Eleanor Roosevelt.jpg (b. 1926) 1984 Feminist, women's rights, founder Florida chapter of National Organization for Women [92]
Frye, Barbara LandstreetBarbara Landstreet Frye (1922–1982) 1984 Capitol Bureau Chief for United Press International [93]
Hughes, Lena B. SmithersLena B. Smithers Hughes (1910–1987) 1984 Botanist who developed virus-free strains of the Valencia orange [94]
Hurston, Zora NealeZora Neale Hurston Hurston-Zora-Neale-LOC.jpg (1891–1960) 1984 Folklorist, anthropologist, and author [95]
Mobley, Sybil CollinsSybil Collins Mobley (1925–2015) 1984 Dean of the School of Business and Industry at Florida A&M University [96]
Muir, HelenHelen Muir (1911–2006) 1984 Journalist, author of books on Florida [97]
Soler, Gladys PumariegaGladys Pumariega Soler (1930–1993) 1984 Pediatrician [98]
Tuttle, Julia DeForest SturtevantJulia DeForest Sturtevant Tuttle Julia DeForest Tuttle.jpg (1848–1898) 1984 Business woman, land owner of what became Miami, Florida [99]
Bethune, Mary McLeodMary McLeod Bethune Bethune42h.jpg (1875–1955) 1982 Civil rights leader [100]
Coleman, Helene S.Helene S. Coleman (b. 1925) 1982 President of the National Council of Jewish Women [101]
Gordon, ElaineElaine Gordon (1931–2000) 1982 Legislator [102]
Harvey, Wilhelmina Celeste GoehringWilhelmina Celeste Goehring Harvey (1912–2005) 1982 Mayor of Key West, Florida [103]
Milton, Paula MaePaula Mae Milton (1939–1980) 1982 Creative arts civic leader [104]
Palmer, Barbara JoBarbara Jo Palmer (b. 1948) 1982 Florida State University Director of Women’s Intercollegiate Athletics [105]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Members Florida Women's Hall of Fame". Florida Commission on the Status of Women. Retrieved October 20, 2012. 
  2. ^ "The 2012 Florida Statutes". Florida State Senate. Retrieved October 26, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Abouit the FCSW". FCSW. Retrieved October 20, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Shutts & Bowen Sponsors Florida Women's Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony". Shutts and Bowen. Retrieved October 20, 2012. 
  5. ^ Florida, West Publishing Company, West Group, Harrison Company (2009). West's Florida statutes annotated: under arrangement of the official Florida statutes, Volume 12, Part 2. West Group. p. 110. 
  6. ^ Otto, Steve (October 12, 2012). "Otto: Gage helped bring the Boss to Tampa". The Tampa Tribune. Retrieved October 21, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Virtual Tour (Florida State Capitol)". State of Florida. Retrieved October 21, 2012. 
  8. ^ Information Please; Holly Hartman (2003). Girlwonder: Every Girl's Guide to the Fantastic Feats, Cool Qualities, and Remarkable Abilities of Women and Girls. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. pp. 63–5. ISBN 978-0-618-31939-8. 
  9. ^ Ceballos, John. "Carol Jenkins Barnett honored for charity work with induction into Florida Women’s Hall of Fame". Januuary 29, 2016. The Ledger. Retrieved February 3, 2016. "Carol Jenkins Barnett". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  10. ^ Hines, Bea L. (January 21, 2016). "Friends and Neighbors: Helen Aguirre Ferre named to Florida Women’s Hall of Fame". Miami Herald. Retrieved February 3, 2016. "Helen Aguirre Ferré". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  11. ^ "Attorney General Pam Bondi Welcomes Three Inducted Into Florida Women’s Commission Hall Of Fame". Space Coast Daily. January 28, 2016. Retrieved February 3, 2016. "Elmira Louise Leto". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  12. ^ "Mary Lee Nunnally Farrior". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  13. ^ "Evelyn C. Keiser". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  14. ^ Hartung, Ron. "The Adventures of Charlotte Maguire: From ‘Girl Doctor’ to Philanthropist". Florida State University College of Medicine. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  15. ^ "Sheriff Susan Benton". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  16. ^ Blackburn, Doug (December 11, 2014). "FSU honors Seminole legend Louise Gopher". Tallahassee Democrat. Retrieved February 3, 2016. "Louise Jones Gopher". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  17. ^ "Dottie Berger MacKinnon". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  18. ^ "Clara C. Frye". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  19. ^ "Aleene Pridgen Kidd MacKenzie". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  20. ^ Engoren, Jan (May 1, 2013). "Early pioneer woman inducted into Florida Hall of Fame". Sun Sentinael. Retrieved February 3, 2016. "Lillie Pierce Voss". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  21. ^ "Ruth H. Alexander". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  22. ^ "Vicki Bryant Burke". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  23. ^ "Elizabeth Budd Bell". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  24. ^ "Mary Karl inducted into Florida Women's Hall of Fame". Daytona State College. Retrieved October 12, 2012. 
  25. ^ "Anna I. Rodriguez, Founder". Florida Coalition Against Human Trafficking. Retrieved October 12, 2012. 
  26. ^ Clark, Haven (1999), pp. 96–100
  27. ^ "Claudine Dianne Ryce". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  28. ^ Reiss, Dawn (January–February 2009). "Dara Torres: Life in the Fast Lane: It's Been a "Surprising Ride" for the Seasoned Olympian, Who at 41 Is Living Proof That There's No Age Limit on Dreams". Saturday Evening Post  – via Questia (subscription required) 281 (1): 54. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  29. ^ "Louise Cortelis". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  30. ^ "Gwen Margolis official page". Florida Senate. Retrieved October 12, 2012. 
  31. ^ "Betty Schlesinger Sembler". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  32. ^ "Justice Barbara J. Pariente". Florida Supreme Court. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  33. ^ Blyler, Dianne (Jul–Aug 2006). "The Elephants of the Cultural Carousel". Tampa Bay Magazine: 50. 
  34. ^ "Ileana Ros-Lehtine". United States Congress. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  35. ^ Chambliss, John (November 4, 2011). "Maryly VanLeer Peck, Former PCC President, Dies at 81". TheLedger.com. Retrieved October 24, 2012. 
  36. ^ "Profile of Peggy A. Quince". Florida Supreme Court. Retrieved October 20, 2012. 
  37. ^ Patton (December 1, 2005), The Florida Times Union; "Caridad Asensio". FXSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  38. ^ Patton (December 1, 2005), The Florida Times Union; "Tillie Kidd Fowler". United States Congress. Retrieved October 20, 2012. 
  39. ^ Patton (December 1, 2005), The Florida Times Union; "Lucy W. Morgan". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  40. ^ "Shirley D. Coletti". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  41. ^ "Judith Kersey". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  42. ^ "Marion P. Hammer". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  43. ^ "Sarah Ann Blocker". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  44. ^ "Gloria Estefan". Biography.com. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  45. ^ Basse, Craig (November 9, 2006). "Pioneering politician Mary Grizzle dies". Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  46. ^ Curry, PhD ARNP, Kim. "Pioneer in Florida Public Health Nursing: The Work of Joyce Ely, R.N." (PDF). University of South Florida. Retrieved October 24, 2012. 
  47. ^ "Tori Jennings". University of South Florida. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  48. ^ "Frances Langford". allmusic. Retrieved October 20, 2012. 
  49. ^ "Jessie Ball DuPont Papers" (PDF). History Associates Inc. Retrieved October 20, 2012. 
  50. ^ "Executive Profile-Linda Keever". Bloomberg Businessweek. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  51. ^ "Lenore Carerro Nesbitt". Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  52. ^ Clarke, Liz (January 17, 2012). "Tennis great Chris Evert finds new life on the court". The Washington Post. Retrieved October 24, 2012. 
  53. ^ "Paula Hawkins". United States Congress. Retrieved October 20, 2012. 
  54. ^ "Major General Marianne Mathewson-Chapman" (PDF). Office of Secretary of Defense. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  55. ^ "Althea Gibson bio". International Tennis Hall of Fameand Museum. Retrieved October 20, 2012. 
  56. ^ "Sister Jeanne O'Laughlin, OP, PhD (1981–2004)". Barry University. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  57. ^ Hyman, Ann (December 5, 1999). "Woodswoman Hailed as Florida's Treasure". The Florida Times Union – via Questia (subscription required). Retrieved February 1, 2016. "Dessie Smith Prescott". Wahoo Ranch. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  58. ^ "Proclamation – Helen Gordon Davis Day" (PDF). City of Tampa. October 16, 2008. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  59. ^ "Mattie Belle Davis". FCSW. Retrieved October 21, 2012. 
  60. ^ "Christine Fulwylie-Bankston". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  61. ^ "Alicia Baro". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  62. ^ "Obituary: Carita Doggett Corse". The Florida Historical Quarterly (The Florida Historical Quarterly) 57 (1): 127. July 1978. JSTOR 30147490. (subscription required (help)). 
  63. ^ "Athalie Range collection, 1947–2009". The Black Archives History and Research Foundation of South Florida, Inc. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  64. ^ "Marjorie Harris Carr". Infoplease. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  65. ^ "Former USF President, Betty Castor Nominated by President Obama to the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board". University of South Florida. Retrieved October 21, 2012. 
  66. ^ Vogel, Ruthanne. "Ivy Julia Cromartie Stranahan". Everglades Biographies. Florida International University Libraries. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  67. ^ "Evelyn Stocking Crosslin, M.D.". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  68. ^ "JoAnn H. Morgan". NASA. Retrieved October 21, 2012. 
  69. ^ "Sarah Brooks Pryor". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  70. ^ Love, Cott (2006), pp. 32–33; "Nikki Beare". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  71. ^ Perdue, Green (2001), p. 180; Wickman, Patricia (Fall 2003). "Reviewed Work: A Seminole Legend: The Life of Betty Mae Tiger Jumper by Betty Mae Tiger Jumper, Patsy West". The Florida Historical Quarterly. The Best Laid Plans: Community, History, and Urban Development in Central Florida (The Florida Historical Quarterly) 82 (2): 251–254. JSTOR 30149489. (subscription required (help)). 
  72. ^ "Gladys Nichols Milton". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  73. ^ Goyer, Robert (September 1, 2011). "Betty Skelton, Aerobatics Star, Dies at 85". Flying Magazine. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  74. ^ "Paulina Pedroso". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  75. ^ "Janet Reno biography". U.S. Dept of Justice. Retrieved October 21, 2012. 
  76. ^ Smith, Rhonda L. (July 1986). "Reviewed Work: Jackie Cochran: Pilot in the Fast Lane by Doris L. Rich". The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society (Kentucky Historical Society) 105 (3): 526–528. JSTOR 23388728. (subscription required (help)). 
  77. ^ "Carrie P. Meek". United States Congress. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  78. ^ Clement, Gail. "Ruth Bryan Owen (Rohde)". Everglades Biographies. Florida International University Libraries. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  79. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; "Annie Ackerman". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  80. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; "Rosemary Barkett". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  81. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; "Gwendolyn Sawyer Cherry". Gwen S. Cherry Black Women Lawyers Association. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  82. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; "Dorothy Dodd". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  83. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; Ware (2005), pp. 180–182
  84. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; "Elsie Jones Hare". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  85. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; "EM Johnson". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  86. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; "Frances Bartlett Kinne". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  87. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; "Arva Moore Parks McCabe". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  88. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; "Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings". University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  89. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; Lambert, Bruce (August 31, 1991). "Dr. Florence B. Seibert, Inventor Of Standard TB Test, Dies at 93". New York Times. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  90. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; "Marilyn K. Smith". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  91. ^ Florida Historical Quarterly (July 1986), Florida Women's Hall of Fame Awards; Warren, Cleve (January 22, 2013). "Eartha M.M. White and the Acts of Life". The Florida Times Union – via Questia (subscription required). Retrieved February 1, 2016. "Eartha MM White". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  92. ^ Love, Cott (2006), pp. 48–49; Harakas, Margo (May 26, 1999). "Roxcy O'Neal Bolton". SunSentinel.com. Retrieved October 25, 2012. 
  93. ^ "Barbara Landstreet Frye". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  94. ^ "Lena B. Smithers Hughes". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  95. ^ "Zora Neale Hurston:Recordings, Manuscripts, Photographs and Ephemera". Library of Congress. Retrieved October 20, 2012. 
  96. ^ "Sybil Collins Mobley". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  97. ^ Marina, William (Summer 2002). "Reviewed Work: Miami, U.S.A. by Helen Muir". The Florida Historical Quarterly. The Best Laid Plans: Community, History, and Urban Development in Central Florida (The Florida Historical Quarterly) 81 (1): 115–117. JSTOR 30147633. (subscription required (help)). 
  98. ^ "Gladys Pumariega Soler". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  99. ^ "Julia Tuttle". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  100. ^ Thomas, Charles Walker (January 1958). "Reviewed Work: Mary McLeod Bethune by Emma Gelders Sterne". The Journal of Negro History (Association for the Study of African American Life and History) 43 (1): 62–64. JSTOR 2715465. (subscription required (help)). "Mary McLeod Bethune Council House". National Park Service. Retrieved October 20, 2012. 
  101. ^ "Helene S. Coleman". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  102. ^ Berger, Ellis (February 26, 2000). "Political Pioneer Loses Fight For Life". Sun-Sentinel. 
  103. ^ "Wilhelmina Celeste Goehring Harvey". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  104. ^ "Paula Mae Milton". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 
  105. ^ "Barbara Jo Palmer". FCSW. Retrieved February 1, 2016. 

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]