Floxuridine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Floxuridine
Floxuridine.png
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com Monograph
MedlinePlus a682006
Pregnancy
category
  • (US): D
Routes of
administration
Intra-arterial
ATC code
  • none
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.066
Chemical and physical data
Formula C9H11FN2O5
Molar mass 246.192 g/mol
3D model (Jmol)
  (verify)

Floxuridine (also 5-fluorodeoxyuridine) is an oncology drug that belongs to the class known as antimetabolites. The drug is most often used in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

Pharmacology[edit]

Floxuridine, an analog of 5-fluorouracil, is a fluorinated pyrimidine.

Mechanism of action[edit]

Floxuridine works because it is broken down by the body into its active form, which is the same as a metabolite of 5-Fluorouracil.

History[edit]

Floxuridine first gained FDA approval in December 1970 under the brand name FUDR. The drug was initially marketed by Roche, which also did a lot of the initial work on 5-fluorouracil. The National Cancer Institute was an early developer of the drug. Roche sold its FUDR product line in 2001 to F H Faulding, which became Mayne Pharma.

Suppliers[edit]

In the US the drug is supplied by APP Pharmaceuticals, LLC; Hospira, Inc.; and Bedford Laboratories.